San Diego City Council election, 2004

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San Diego City Council election, 2004
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← 2002 November 2, 2004 (2004-11-02) 2006 →

4 of 8 seats on the San Diego City Council
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Seats before 6 2
Seats after 6 2
Seat change Steady Steady

The 2004 San Diego City Council election occurred on November 2, 2004. The primary election was held on March 2, 2004. Four of the eight seats of the San Diego City Council were contested. This election used the boundaries created by the 2000 Redistricting Committee for the odd-numbered districts. All four incumbent council members ran for reelection in their respective districts.

Municipal elections in California are officially non-partisan, although most candidates do identify a party preference. A two-round system was used for the election, starting with a primary in March followed by a runoff in November between the top-two candidates if no candidate received a majority of the votes in the first round.

Campaign[edit]

Council Districts used for the 2004 election

The 2004 election used the eight district boundaries created by the 2000 Redistricting Commission for the odd numbered districts. Seats in districts 1, 3, 5, and 7 were up for election.

Results[edit]

District 1[edit]

District 1 consisted of the communities of Black Mountain Ranch, Carmel Valley, Del Mar Mesa, La Jolla, Pacific Highlands Ranch, Rancho Peñasquitos, Torrey Highlands, Torrey Hills, Torrey Pines, and University City. Incumbent council member Scott Peters stood for reelection. Peters advanced out of the March primary with a plurality of the vote and was reelected with a majority of the vote in the November general election.

San Diego City Council District 1 primary election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Scott Peters 19,983 48.43
Republican Phil Thalheimer 12,816 31.06
Democratic Kathryn Burton 8,433 20.44
Total votes 41,260 100
San Diego City Council District 1 general election, 2004[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Scott Peters 38,087 54.71
Republican Phil Thalheimer 31,535 45.29
Total votes 69,622 100

District 3[edit]

District 3 consisted of the communities of Balboa Park, City Heights, Golden Hill, Hillcrest, Kensington, Normal Heights, North Park, South Park, Talmadge, and University Heights. Incumbent council member Toni Atkins stood for reelection. Atkins was reelected with a majority of the vote in the March primary.

San Diego City Council District 3 primary election, 2004[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Toni Atkins 16,273 60.37
Democratic John Hartley 8,746 32.45
Republican Gonzalo Garcia 1,898 7.04
Total votes 26,954 100

District 5[edit]

District 5 consisted of the communities of Carmel Mountain Ranch, Mira Mesa, Rancho Bernardo, Sabre Springs, Scripps Ranch, and San Pasqual. Incumbent council member Brian Maienschein ran for reelection uncontested and was therefore elected with 100 percent of the vote in the March primary.

San Diego City Council District 5 primary election, 2004[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Brian Maienschein 33,024 100.00
Total votes 33,024 100

District 7[edit]

District 7 consisted of the communities of Allied Gardens, City Heights, College Area, Del Cerro, El Cerrito, Grantville, MCAS Miramar, Mission Trails Regional Park, Redwood VillageOak Park, Rolando, San Carlos, Stonebridge Estates, and Tierrasanta. Incumbent council member Jim Madaffer stood for reelection. Madaffer was reelected with a majority of the vote in the March primary.

San Diego City Council District 7 primary election, 2004[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jim Madaffer 20,977 68.35
Democratic Irene Stallard-Rodriguez 9,659 31.47
Total votes 30,689 100

Aftermath[edit]

The new city council was sworn in December 2004. Council member Michael Zucchet of district 2 was initially tapped to serve as deputy mayor.[5] Zucchet briefly served as acting mayor of San Diego after the resignation of Dick Murphy. Atkins took over as acting mayor when Zucchet was forced to resign shortly thereafter due to a corruption conviction.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Election History - Council District 1" (PDF). City of San Diego. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "Election History - Council District 3" (PDF). City of San Diego. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  3. ^ "Election History - Council District 5" (PDF). City of San Diego. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  4. ^ "Election History - Council District 7" (PDF). City of San Diego. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  5. ^ "Taxpayers To Pay Legal Bills For Subpoenaed City Employees". ABC 10 News. 21 December 2004. Retrieved 20 January 2013. 
  6. ^ Pollack, Andrew (19 July 2005). "2 San Diego Officials Are Found Guilty of Corruption". New York Times. Retrieved 20 January 2013.