San Fernando High School

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San Fernando High School
Location
11133 O'Melveny Avenue.
Pacoima, Los Angeles, California
Information
Type Public
Established 1896
School district Los Angeles Unified School District
Dean Mr. D. Cloutier, Mr. T. Hernandez
Principal Florentina Werner Mendoza
Staff Mr. Fries Assistant Principal, Mr. Lawrence Assistant Principal
Faculty Ms. Byme School Nurse
Grades 9-12
Enrollment 3,610
Color(s) Black and Gold         
Mascot Tigers
Information (818) 898-7920
Website

San Fernando High School is a high school of the Los Angeles Unified School District. It is located in the Pacoima neighborhood of Los Angeles, in the northeastern San Fernando Valley, California. It is near and also serves the City of San Fernando.[1]

History[edit]

San Fernando High School—SFHS was established in 1896. It is one of the oldest high schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District. SFHS was originally located on Fifth and Hager Streets in the City of San Fernando.

In 1906, the school moved to a new campus on North Brand Boulevard, the present day location of San Fernando Middle School. San Fernando High School moved again in 1952, to its present Mission Hills campus location.

The auditorium was renamed after César Chávez in 2000, with the dedication ceremony on June 11, 2000.[1]

Description[edit]

The San Fernando High School colors are black and gold.

School attendance boundaries[edit]

Students in the City of San Fernando are assigned to the school. Originally more of the Pacoima neighborhood was zoned to the school, but much of it was reassigned to Arleta High School upon that school's opening in 2006. Students in the San Fernando Gardens public housing complex in Pacoima are still assigned to San Fernando High School.[citation needed]

San Fernando High School's attendance boundary changed numerous times as well as new high schools opening in the area. In the fall of 2006, 9th and 10th grade students in a portion of San Fernando High School's 2005-2006 school year zone will attend Arleta High School instead of San Fernando [1]; Arleta will phase in grades 11 through 12 [2].

The school was further relieved of overcrowding when César Chávez Learning Academies (Valley Region High School 5) opened in 2011.[2] [3]

Demographics[edit]

As of 2000 the school had 4,500 students.[3]

As of 2000 the school had 220 faculty members. 10% of them had attended San Fernando High School as students. At the time the school was actively seeking alumni to be teachers. Many of the teachers who were alumni of San Fernando High were bilingual and could offer assistance to Spanish-speaking students.[3]

School programs[edit]

In 2008 it was announced that San Fernando High School would start on a traditional academic calendar, rather than the "year-round" staggered calendar to accommodate overcrowding, in fall of that year. The traditional calendar allows all three tracks (A, B, and C-track; roughly 3300 students in total) to join as one academic class. It also made it impossible for the city's planned charter middle school to take campus facilities from San Fernando High School.

It is the only high school in California with Project G.R.A.D. (Graduation Really Achieves Dreams).

Athletics[edit]

Football[edit]

Operating the wishbone offense (a rarity in California) with future USC stars Charles White and Kevin Williams, San Fernando High won the L.A. City Football title in 1974 and 1975, repeating the 1934, 1937, 1953 and 1967 season championships. Prior to the 1975 season, they were ranked #1 in the country. In 1976 they lost their first game of the season to Gardena High by a score of 41-0. The team rebounded, losing only one more game (and defeating John Elway's Granada Hills Charter High School team along the way) to earn a spot in the city playoffs. They went on to defeat Banning High School to win the city title. In 2012 the team lost to Van Nuys and Sylmar High School out of their ten games making them 8-2, leading them to the Division 2 Championship against Canoga Park. They repeated in 2013, becoming back to back champions. It is for Charles White that San Fernando High's football stadium is presently named.

Wrestling[edit]

The San Fernando High School wrestling team currently holds the largest number of city championships in Los Angeles. They have been the City Wrestling Champions in 1977, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1983, 1987, 1991, 2001—2003, 2006—2009, 2012, and in 2013.

During the 2006 Season, the Tiger wrestling team had an undefeated season, stating a record of 21-0. The 2006 wrestling team took first place at the C.I.F. championship, with five of their wrestlers qualifying for the State championship.

In 2013, Johnny Parada became the first ever CIF wrestling state champion from the Los Angeles City Section when he defeated Wyatt Wyckoff of Paradise High School 13-6 for the 126lbs. title.

Baseball[edit]

1991, 2011 & 2013 City Baseball Team Champions. 1988 City Championship Runners-up. Lost to Monroe H.S. The Tigers beat El Camino Real for a final score of 2-0 at USC in the semifinals and beating Chatsworth 8-6 at Dodger Stadium in the final.

Soccer[edit]

1973 City Soccer Team Champions. The LAUSD offered soccer as an official LAUSD sport. winning their first ever championship against Franklin High, 2 to 1.

2010, City Soccer Team Champions and played in the Southern California Regional Playoffs up to semi-finals.

Basketball[edit]

1981 Basketball League Champions 1988 Varsity Basketball League Champions; Varsity Baseball City Finalists, JV Baseball League Champions

Notable alumni[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Auditorium to Be Named for Chavez." Los Angeles Times. June 10, 2000. Retrieved on April 27, 2014.
  2. ^ "11. Proposed Changes to Valley Region High School Zone #5 Zone of Choice Area Schools" (Archive). Los Angeles Unified School District. Retrieved on April 27, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Sandoval, Eric. "For San Fernando High Students, Future May Be in Front of Class." Los Angeles Times. July 23, 2000. Retrieved on April 27, 2014.
  4. ^ Stuart, Tessa (11 October 2012). "San Fernando: America's Sexiest, Most Scandal-Ridden City Government". LA Weekly. Retrieved 13 December 2015. 
  5. ^ Hopper, Hedda (March 7, 1965). "In Hollywood". Texas, Harlingen. Valley Morning Star. p. 7. Retrieved November 26, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  6. ^ Roberts, Sam (September 10, 2016). "Bobby Chacon, Boxing Champion Hounded by Misfortune, Dies at 64". The New York Times. 
  7. ^ Interview Transcript (November 13, 2008). "Rep. Barbara Lee". The Tavis Smiley Show. Retrieved February 28, 2011. 
  8. ^ "Broadcasters". phillies.com. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  9. ^ "Malcolm Moore". Pro Football Reference. Retrieved June 19, 2015. 
  10. ^ 20th State Senate district: Alex Padilla
  11. ^ "Richie Valens". Retrieved June 19, 2010. 
  12. ^ L. Jon Wertheim (November 3, 1997). "Usc Running Back Charles White". CNN. Retrieved June 19, 2010. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 34°16′19″N 118°26′35″W / 34.272°N 118.443°W / 34.272; -118.443