San Francisco Marriott Marquis

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San Francisco Marriott Marquis
Marriott logo gray.png
2017 San Francisco Marriott Marquis Hotel from Yerba Buena Gardens.jpg
(2017)
San Francisco Marriott Marquis is located in San Francisco
San Francisco Marriott Marquis
Location within San Francisco
Hotel chainMarriott Corporation
General information
LocationUnited States
Address55 Fourth Street
San Francisco, California
Coordinates37°47′06″N 122°24′15″W / 37.7849°N 122.4043°W / 37.7849; -122.4043Coordinates: 37°47′06″N 122°24′15″W / 37.7849°N 122.4043°W / 37.7849; -122.4043
Opening1989
CostUS$150 million
OwnerHost Hotels & Resorts
ManagementMarriott International
Height132.89 m (436.0 ft)
Technical details
Floor count39
Design and construction
ArchitectZeidler Partnership Architects
Daniel Mann Johnson & Mendenhall
Anthony J. Lumsden
Martin Middlebrook Louie
Other information
Number of rooms1,362
Number of suites137
Number of restaurantsBin 55
Mission Grille (closed)
Fourth Street Bar & Grille(closed)
The View
"Mission Street Pantry" ( opened 2015 )
ParkingUS$13 hourly / US$58.14 daily
Website
http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/sfodt-san-francisco-marriott-marquis/
[1][2][3]

The San Francisco Marriott Marquis is a 133 m (436 ft) 39-story skyscraper in the South of Market neighborhood of San Francisco, California. Situated at the intersection of Fourth and Mission Streets, across from the Metreon and Moscone Convention Center, the building is recognizable by the distinctive postmodern appearance of its high-rise tower. The building was completed in 1989, and contains 1,500 hotel rooms.[4] The original architectural firm Zeidler Partnership Architects was replaced by DMJM architect Anthony J Lumsden, who gave the building its overall architectural style.[5] The San Francisco Marriott is the second tallest hotel in San Francisco, after Hilton San Francisco Tower I.

The hotel was at the heart of the city of San Francisco's development of the central blocks in the South of Market area during the late 1970s and early 1980s.[6] The city had put out an invitation to property developers to come up with ideas for the area. Ten developers originally responded and the eventual proposal chosen - in October 1980 - was a joint effort by Marriott together with the Canadian property developers Olympia and York.[citation needed]

The Marriott Marquis opened on October 17, 1989, the day of the Loma Prieta earthquake.[7] With better earthquake proofing than several nearby hotels, the building only lost a single window.[7]

The San Francisco Marriott Marquis is one of eight Marriott International hotels in the city along with Courtyard San Francisco Downtown, Courtyard San Francisco Fisherman's Wharf, San Francisco Marriott Fisherman's Wharf, San Francisco Marriott Union Square, JW Marriott San Francisco Union Square, Hotel Adagio, and the Ritz-Carlton, San Francisco.

In popular culture[edit]

Local newspaper columnist Herb Caen complained that reflections from the hotel's windows blinded him in his office at the nearby Chronicle building, and compared its shape to that of a jukebox.[7] Jimmy Fallon, on the July 25, 2011 episode of his show, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon, obliquely referred to the Marriott Marquis and its renowned shape in his monologue, joking, "[Jeopardy! game show host] Alex Trebek actually hurt his leg while chasing [a] robber [out of his hotel room]. When 911 asked for his location, he was like, 'Erected in 1989, this San Francisco hotel became famous for its distinctive "jukebox" appearance.'"[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes

  1. ^ San Francisco Marriott Marquis at Emporis
  2. ^ "San Francisco Marriott Marquis". SkyscraperPage.
  3. ^ San Francisco Marriott Marquis at Structurae
  4. ^ Sarah Duxbury (February 8, 2008). "$200M Hotel Joins Inn Crowd". San Francisco Business Times. Retrieved 2010-04-06.
  5. ^ Christopher Hawthorne (October 10, 2011). "Anthony J. Lumsden dies at 83; Southern California architect". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 7 April 2012.
  6. ^ Chester Hartman, City for Sale. The Transformation of San Francisco. Berkeley, University of California Press, 2002, chapter 8.
  7. ^ a b c Rosato, Joe (Oct 17, 2014). "25 Years Since Loma Prieta: San Francisco Marriott Marquis Shares Unfortunate Date with Disaster". NBC Bay Area. Retrieved Oct 17, 2014.
  8. ^ "The Best of Late Nite Jokes". Newsmax. Jul 28, 2011. Retrieved 7 April 2012.

Further reading

External links[edit]