San Francisco Theological Seminary

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San Francisco Theological Seminary
RedlandsGST-SFTS Style1 1815 WEB.png
Established1871
Religious affiliation
Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
Location, ,
United States

37°58′11″N 122°33′56″W / 37.96972°N 122.56556°W / 37.96972; -122.56556[1]Coordinates: 37°58′11″N 122°33′56″W / 37.96972°N 122.56556°W / 37.96972; -122.56556[1]
CampusSuburban, 14 acres
AffiliationsUniversity of Redlands; Graduate Theological Union; University of California, Berkeley
Websitewww.redlands.edu/study/schools-and-centers/gst/sfts/

The San Francisco Theological Seminary (SFTS) is a seminary in San Anselmo, California with historic ties to the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.);[2] SFTS became embedded in the private, nonprofit University of Redlands in 2019.[3]

SFTS is a founding member of the Graduate Theological Union (GTU) in Berkeley, a large consortium of graduate schools and seminaries in the Bay Area.[4] Through this membership, students have access to the Flora Lamson Hewlett Library and enjoy many opportunities to learn from and engage with religious traditions outside of the Reformed tradition. Additionally, students are privy to the academic resources at the University of California, Berkeley[5] and, most recently, University of Redlands.[6]

History[edit]

San Francisco Theological Seminary

San Francisco pastor William Anderson Scott opened two Presbyterian schools in his churches in the mid-19th century, the second of which became the San Francisco Theological Seminary. In 1871, SFTS began with four professors and four students meeting for instruction at the Presbyterian City College located in what now is Union Square. Six years later, the seminary moved to its own building next to the City College building on Haight Street.[7]

The seminary moved in 1890 to a 14-acre (57,000 m2) hilltop site in Marin County about 15 miles (24 km) north of the Golden Gate Bridge. A new charter issued in 1900 gave the seminary power to grant degrees, and jurisdiction over the seminary was transferred from the synod to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in 1913.[8]

In the post World War II era under its president, Jesse Hays Baird, SFTS enjoyed unprecedented expansion, with enrollment increasing to more than 300 and new buildings rising all over the San Anselmo campus. SFTS joined in 1962 with neighboring graduate schools and academic centers in founding the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. The GTU developed joint M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in cooperation with the graduate school at the University of California Berkeley.[9]

In 1990, SFTS opened its second campus in Pasadena, which was housed in the Pasadena Presbyterian Church. Due to seminary budget cuts, the board of trustees voted to close the Pasadena campus in February 2011.[10] However, despite the announced closure, the seminary continued to consider alternative opportunities to expand their programs in Southern California.

In February 2019, SFTS announced its intention to become part of the University of Redlands, based in Southern California's Inland Empire region.[11] The merger was complete on July 1, 2019, creating a new Graduate School of Theology that carried SFTS programs forward and expanded opportunities for its students.[12]

Academics[edit]

San Francisco Theological Seminary degree programs include the Master of Divinity, Master of Arts, and Doctor of Ministry. The seminary also offers graduate-level diplomas and certificate programs. In conjunction with the Graduate Theological Union and the University of California Berkeley, students can also earn a Master of Arts or Doctor of Philosophy.

Academic affiliations[edit]

  • Graduate Theological Union Berkeley: Through GTU schools and centers, SFTS students can relate to wider communities within Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy and Protestantism. SFTS students enjoy free and open cross-registration with all GTU member institutions.
  • University of California Berkeley: Through Graduate Theological Union agreements, SFTS students enjoy free cross-registration for UC Berkeley courses and the use of the university's research and performing arts centers, its nearly 100 library collections and approximately 80 museum collections.
  • University of Redlands: As part of the University of Redlands, SFTS students have access to a wide range of programming, including joint degrees through the University's School of Business and School of Education.[13]

Notable alumni[edit]

Notable faculty members[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: San Francisco Theological Seminary
  2. ^ "History". San Francisco Theological Seminary. University of Redlands. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  3. ^ "Two become one, and stronger together". Bulldog Blog. University of Redlands. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  4. ^ "History of the Graduate Theological Union". Graduate Theological Union. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  5. ^ "Schools and Centers". Graduate Theological Union. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  6. ^ "Pathways to Possibility". SFTS. SFTS at the University of Redlands. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  7. ^ "History". San Francisco Theological Seminary. University of Redlands. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  8. ^ "History". San Francisco Theological Seminary. University of Redlands. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  9. ^ "History". San Francisco Theological Seminary. University of Redlands. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  10. ^ "San Francisco seminary to close Pasadena campus". The Christian Century. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  11. ^ Rodriguez, Adrian. "San Francisco Theological Seminary in San Anselmo merges with Southern California-based University of Redlands". www.marinij.com. Marin Independent Journal. Retrieved 27 February 2019.
  12. ^ "Two become one, and stronger together". Bulldog Blog. University of Redlands. Retrieved 1 July 2019.
  13. ^ "Marin campus". University of Redlands. Retrieved 1 July 2019.

External links[edit]