San Joaquin College of Law

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San Joaquin College of Law
San Joaquin College of Law logo.jpg
SJCL's main building
MottoLex Justitia (Law Justice)
Established1969
School typePrivate
DeanJanice L. Pearson
LocationClovis, California, United States
Enrollment204
Faculty10 full-time; 41 adjunct
Bar pass rate18% (July 2019 first-time takers)[1]
WebsiteSan Joaquin College of Law
SJCLBuildingforWIKI.jpg

San Joaquin College of Law (SJCL) is a private law school in Clovis, California.

History[edit]

SJCL was founded in Fresno in 1969 by Fresno County Municipal Court Judge Dan Eymann, U.S. District Court Judge Oliver Wanger, and attorney John Loomis.[2][3] The school began instruction in 1970.

In 1996, SJCL relocated to the original Clovis High School building. The structure was built in 1920.[4] The renovation, including a new courtroom, lecture hall, and enlarged library, allowed the Law School to expand, while still maintaining the historic character of the building.[5]

Accreditation[edit]

SJCL is approved by the Committee of Bar Examiners of the State Bar of California.[6] It is not approved by the American Bar Association. As a result, SJCL graduates may not qualify to take the bar or practice outside of California.[7]

Bar pass rate[edit]

For the July 2019 bar exam, the school's pass rate for first-time takers was 18%.[8] In order to evaluate the "qualitative soundness of a law school's program of legal education," the State Bar of California requires all California-Accredited Law schools to provide cumulative bar passage rates for the previous five years. In 2019, SJCL's cumulative five-year bar pass rate was 72.4%, vs. 77.4% in 2018.[9]

San Joaquin Agricultural Law Review[edit]

The San Joaquin Agricultural Law Review has been published by SJCL students since 1990, making it the oldest of the three law reviews in the United States focusing on agriculture law.[10][11][12][13]

New American Legal Clinic[edit]

The New American Legal Clinic (NALC) is a non-profit immigration law clinic that operates out of San Joaquin College of Law.[14] There is both a classroom and practical component to the clinical course which is offered every fall, spring and summer session. There is a director and legal director as well as clinical staff that instruct and assist the students in completing and filing cases with the Department of Homeland Security/USCIS as well as the immigration courts.[15] Cases are handled by students and supervised by professors. The NALC Clinic is also recognized as a source of information for media, practitioners, immigrants’ rights groups and collaboratives and agricultural and other industry employers in the Central San Joaquin Valley of California.[16]

Family Law Mediation Clinic[edit]

Students and faculty of San Joaquin College of Law provide alternative dispute resolution services in a free family law mediation clinic.[17] They meet with husband and wife in the mediation setting to help them negotiate a legal agreement while avoiding the time and expense of going to court. In their role as mediators, they do not represent either party, nor do they represent the parties jointly.

Notable faculty[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.calbar.ca.gov/Portals/0/documents/July2019-CBX-Statistics.pdf
  2. ^ "Judge Oliver Wanger, Founder, SJCL, on KYNO". 2016-03-04. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  3. ^ "Co-founder John Loomis on KMJ Now". 2016-03-04. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  4. ^ Historical Sites in Fresno County-Fresno County Public Library
  5. ^ Brown, Todd R., "Central Valley's Only Law School Turns 40," The Business Journal, August 9, 2010 Accessed March 28, 2011
  6. ^ "The State Bar of California". www.calbar.ca.gov. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  7. ^ "Accreditation". www.sjcl.edu. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  8. ^ "General Statistics Report July 2019 California Bar Examination" (PDF). Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  9. ^ "2019 Cumulative Minimum Bar Examination Pass Rates (MPR) for California Accredited Law Schools" (PDF). Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  10. ^ National Ag Law Center, References Archived 2004-02-02 at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ Washington and Lee University School of Law Law Library – Law Journals: Submissions and Ranking "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-11-21. Retrieved 2018-05-01.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  12. ^ "San Joaquin Agricultural Review". www.sjcl.edu. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  13. ^ "First Ever Agricultural Law Review Hits the Streets Today in its Debut". Fresno Bee. 14 June 1991. Archived from the original on 25 October 2012. Retrieved 17 December 2019.
  14. ^ "New American Legal Clinic". www.sjcl.edu. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  15. ^ "New Citizens through NALC". Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  16. ^ "Professors Purvis and Atkinson on KFCF". 2016-03-04. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2019-12-17.
  17. ^ "Family Law Mediation Clinic". Archived from the original on 2010-07-27. Retrieved 2019-12-17.

External links[edit]

36°49′28″N 119°41′51″W / 36.82444°N 119.69750°W / 36.82444; -119.69750Coordinates: 36°49′28″N 119°41′51″W / 36.82444°N 119.69750°W / 36.82444; -119.69750