San Jose, Batangas

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
San Jose
Municipality
SanJose,Batangasjf1578 15.JPG
Official seal of San Jose
Seal
Nickname(s): Egg Basket of the Philippines[1]
Map of Batangas showing the location of San Jose
Location within Batangas province
San Jose is located in Philippines
San Jose
San Jose
Location within the Philippines
Coordinates: 13°52′38″N 121°06′18″E / 13.8772°N 121.105°E / 13.8772; 121.105Coordinates: 13°52′38″N 121°06′18″E / 13.8772°N 121.105°E / 13.8772; 121.105
Country Philippines
Region Calabarzon (Region IV-A)
Province Batangas
District 4th District
Founded April 26, 1765
Barangays 33 (see Barangays)
Government[2]
 • Type Sangguniang Bayan
 • Mayor Valentino Patron
Area[3]
 • Total 53.29 km2 (20.58 sq mi)
Population (2015 census)[4]
 • Total 76,971
 • Density 1,400/km2 (3,700/sq mi)
 • Voter(2016)[5] 44,157
Time zone PST (UTC+8)
ZIP code 4227
IDD:area code +63 (0)43
Income class 1st class
PSGC 041022000

San Jose, officially the Municipality of San Jose (Filipino: Bayan ng San Jose), is a municipality in the province of Batangas in the Calabarzon (Region IV-A) of the Philippines. The population was 76,971 at the 2015 census.[4] In the 2016 electoral roll, it had 44,157 registered voters.[5]

The municipality is bounded in the north and north-east by Lipa City, east by Ibaan, south by Batangas City and San Pascual, and west by Cuenca and Alitagtag.

History[edit]

The Aetas were the first inhabitants of the place. They started clearing some portions of the wilderness especially in areas near the riverbanks. Several groups of settlers then drove this Aetas to the hinterlands and permanently occupied the place. They named it “Malaquing Tubig”, referring to the big river that cuts through the central portion of their early settlement.

The Spaniards then colonized the Philippines. Bauan was established in 1596 as an ecclesiastical unit administered by the order of Saint Agustin with Malaquing Tubig as one of the barrios under its jurisdiction.

Human population of Malaquing Tubig started to grow and in 1754, Taal Volcano erupted destroying the original Bauan. And before its actual site could have been selected, Malaking Tubig was separated from Bauan. The recognized leaders of Malaquing Tubig then petitioned to the Spanish authorities for the creation of that place as a pueblo which was granted to them on April 26, 1765.

Established on April 26, 1765 as the town of San José de Malaquing Tubig, it once formed part of Bauan, and in the new town's establishment, it originally included the land that now makes up the Municipality of Cuenca.

Geography[edit]

San Jose is located at 13°52′38″N 121°06′18″E / 13.8772°N 121.105°E / 13.8772; 121.105.

According to the Philippine Statistics Authority, the municipality has a land area of 53.29 square kilometres (20.58 sq mi)[3] constituting 1.71% of the 3,119.75-square-kilometre- (1,204.54 sq mi) total area of Batangas.

Barangays[edit]

San Jose is politically subdivided into 33 barangays.[6]


PSGC Barangay Population ±% p.a.
2015[4] 2010[7]
041022001 Aguila 3.5% 2,664 2,364 2.30%
041022002 Anus 1.5% 1,150 959 3.52%
041022003 Aya 4.6% 3,548 3,181 2.10%
041022004 Bagong Pook 1.4% 1,079 926 2.95%
041022005 Balagtasin 4.6% 3,553 3,257 1.67%
041022006 Balagtasin I 1.8% 1,399 1,297 1.45%
041022007 Banaybanay I 8.3% 6,418 5,742 2.14%
041022008 Banaybanay II 5.4% 4,135 3,679 2.25%
041022009 Bigain I 3.0% 2,327 2,129 1.71%
041022010 Bigain II 1.5% 1,180 1,094 1.45%
041022011 Calansayan 5.5% 4,214 3,795 2.01%
041022012 Dagatan 3.7% 2,822 2,385 3.26%
041022013 Don Luis 2.5% 1,951 1,748 2.11%
041022014 Galamay‑Amo 7.4% 5,702 4,986 2.59%
041022015 Lalayat 3.2% 2,462 2,226 1.94%
041022016 Lapolapo I 2.5% 1,892 1,689 2.18%
041022017 Lapolapo II 3.0% 2,345 2,130 1.85%
041022018 Lepute 1.0% 807 755 1.28%
041022019 Lumil 4.1% 3,119 2,800 2.08%
041022020 Natunuan 2.3% 1,787 1,620 1.89%
041022021 Palanca 2.4% 1,878 1,741 1.45%
041022022 Pinagtung‑Ulan 5.7% 4,398 3,989 1.88%
041022023 Poblacion Barangay I 0.3% 228 278 −3.70%
041022024 Poblacion Barangay II 0.6% 491 502 −0.42%
041022025 Poblacion Barangay III 0.4% 279 318 −2.46%
041022026 Poblacion Barangay IV 0.4% 339 385 −2.39%
041022027 Sabang 2.1% 1,592 1,237 4.92%
041022028 Salaban 2.1% 1,583 1,322 3.49%
041022029 Santo Cristo 3.6% 2,762 2,477 2.10%
041022030 Mojon‑Tampoy 3.1% 2,355 1,860 4.60%
041022031 Taysan 4.7% 3,654 3,090 3.24%
041022032 Tugtug 2.3% 1,765 1,554 2.45%
041022033 Bigain South 1.4% 1,093 1,002 1.67%
Total 76,971 68,517 2.24%

Demographics[edit]

Population census of San Jose
Year Pop. ±% p.a.
1903 8,996 —    
1918 11,074 +1.40%
1939 12,197 +0.46%
1948 14,645 +2.05%
1960 18,675 +2.05%
1970 24,450 +2.73%
1975 25,757 +1.05%
1980 28,743 +2.22%
1990 38,680 +3.01%
1995 43,886 +2.39%
2000 51,965 +3.69%
2007 61,307 +2.31%
2010 68,517 +4.13%
2015 76,971 +2.24%
Source: Philippine Statistics Authority[4][7][8][9]

In the 2015 census, San Jose had a population of 76,971.[4] The population density was 1,400 inhabitants per square kilometre (3,600/sq mi).

In the 2016 electoral roll, it had 44,157 registered voters.[5]

Government[edit]

List of former Municipal Executives[edit]

Municipal hall

Although currently called "Mayor", the Municipal Executive of San Jose has held other names including Gobernadorcillo which means "Governor" during the Spanish Period.

  • Ignacio de los Santos (1767)
  • Juan Bautista (1768)
  • Juan Enrico (1769)
  • Juan Masilang (1770)
  • Jose Antonio (1771)
  • Luis Isidro (1772 )
  • Jose de la Cruz (1773)
  • Ignacio de Mercado (1774)
  • Domingo de los Santos (1775)
  • Juan Magonza (1776)
  • Miguel de los Santos (1777)
  • Francisco Domingo (1778)
  • Laureano Marquez (1779)
  • Policarpio Kaponpon (1780)
  • Francisco Aguila (1781)
  • Antonio Robles (1782)
  • Felipe Aguila (1783)
  • Nicolas de los Santos (1784)
  • Lorenzo Quizon (1785)
  • Agustin Aguila (1786)
  • Gabriel de Mercado (1787)
  • Pedro Umali (1788)
  • Domingo Dimaculangan (1789)
  • Lucio Hernandez (1790)
  • Bernardo Umali (1791)
  • Ignacio de la Cruz (1792)
  • Agustin de la Cruz (1793)
  • Laureano Bautista (1794)
  • Pascual Madlangbayan (1795)
  • Martin Marquez (1796)
  • Gregorio Morales (1797)
  • Andres de Leon (1798)
  • Diego Robles (1799)
  • Hilario Mandigma (1800)
  • Gregorio Leionardo (1801)
  • Victoriano Isidro (1802)
  • Pablo de los Santos (1803)
  • Fulgencio Quizon (1804)
  • Cristobal de los Santos (1805)
  • Juan Tecson (1806)
  • Nicolas Lopez (1807)
  • Jose de la Cruz (1808)
  • Mariano Tiburcio (1809)
  • Jose Bautista (1810)
  • Valentin Mercado (1811)
  • Remigio Dimaculangan (1812)
  • Tomas Quizon (1813)
  • Cosme Bautista (1814)
  • Santiago Castillo (1815)
  • Apolinario Aguila (1816)
  • Juan de la Cruz (1817)
  • Patricio Virtucio (1818)
  • Joaquin Enrico (1819)
  • Francisco Quizon (1820)
  • Juan Mercado (1821)
  • Jose Marquez (1822)
  • Martin de los Santos (1822)
  • Manuel Mercado (1823)
  • Bernabe Virtucio (1823)
  • Timoteo Tiburcio (1824)
  • Florentino Mendoza (1824)
  • Juan Mendoza (1825)
  • Hilario Aguila (1826)
  • Lucas Hernandez (1827)
  • Vicente Isidro (1828)
  • Juan Quizon (1829)
  • Carlos Mercado (1830)
  • Esteban de la Cruz (1831)
  • Bernardino Hernandez (1832)
  • Geronimo Marquez (1833)
  • Juan Marquez (1834)
  • Hilario Aguila (1835)
  • Felipe Aguila (1836)
  • Agustin Quizon (1837)
  • Vicente Bautista (1838)
  • Romualdo de Ocampo (1839)
  • Fernando de los Santos (1840)
  • Jose de Villa (1841)
  • Hilario Aguila (1842)
  • Hilario Aguila (1843)
  • Vicente Umali (1844)
  • Segundo Leonardo (1845)
  • Agaton Hernandez (1846)
  • Pedro Quizon (1847)
  • Juan Macalinga (1848)
  • Julian Mitra (1849)
  • Braulio de Luna (1850)
  • Juan Javier (1851)
  • Manuel Aguila (1852)
  • Pascual Aguila (1853)
  • Laureano Hernandez (1854)
  • Ubaldo Hernandez (1855)
  • Jose Ona y Gana (1856)
  • Antonio Magpantay (1857)
  • Manuel de Luna (1858)
  • Francisco de Luna (1859)
  • Bonifacio Robles (1860)
  • Roman Ona y Ramos (1861)
  • Pascual Aguila (1862)
  • Nicolas de Villa (1863–64)
  • Briccio Makalintal (1865–68)
  • Camilio Aguila (1869–70)
  • Baltazar Mercado (1871–72)
  • Basilio Gozos (1873–74)
  • Telesforo Hernandez (1875–76)
  • Jorge Umali (1877–78)
  • Simon Lopez (1879–80)
  • Baltazar Mercado (1881–82)
  • Andres Umali (1883–84)
  • Isidro Marquez (1885–86)
  • Remigio Aguila (1887–88)
  • Rafael de Luna (1889)
  • Ventura Aguila (1890–91)
  • Salvador Aguila (1892–94)
  • Juan Oblea (1895–1896)
  • Ambrosio Makalintal (1897–98)
  • Rafael de Luna (1899)
  • Fernando Aguila (1900)
  • Ambrosio Makalintal 1901-2
  • Agaton Marquez (1903)
  • Fernando Aguila (1904–5)
  • Roman Kalalo (1906–7)
  • Fernando Aguila (1908–9)
  • Mariano de Villa (1910–11)
  • Fernando Aguila (1912–14)
  • Manuel Makalintal (1915)
  • Fernando Aguila (1916)
  • Paterno Aguila (1917–18)
  • Vitaliano Luna (1919–21)
  • Manuel Makalintal (1922–24)
  • Daniel Luna (1925–27)
  • Jose de Villa (1928–30)
  • Fernando Aguila (1931–37)
  • Vitaliano Luna (1938–40)
  • Fernando Aguila (1941)
  • Roman Kalalo (1942)
  • Venancio Q. Remo (1943-45)
  • Timoteo Alday (1946–47)
  • Bonifacio Masilungan (1948–58)
  • Primo Vergara (1959)
  • Miguel Ambal Sr. (1960–63)
  • Leonardo Ona Sr. (1964–67)
  • Miguel Ambal Sr. (1968–72)
  • Vicente Briones Kalalo (1972–1986)
  • Edgardo Umali (1986–1987)
  • Antonio Alday (1988–1992)
  • Edgardo Umali (1993–2001)
  • Ruben Guce (2001–2010)
  • Entiquio Briones (2010–2016)
  • Valentino Patron (2016–present)

Economy[edit]

San Jose is well known for growing good varieties of coffee, lanzones, and black pepper. It is where a great number of poultry and piggery animals are grown and sold, especially to Metro Manila, where it supplies a significant percentage of poultry products.[1] Most of the San Jose workforce is either directly or indirectly involved in farming. There are also numerous feedmill corporations within its jurisdiction which include WhiteGold, Everlast, Busilac, Wincom, New Golden Mix.

Attractions[edit]

Archdiocesan Shrine of Saint Joseph the Patriarch

The Shrine of Saint Joseph the Patriarch located in the town proper is a popular Catholic pilgrimage site. It was once built with cogon and bamboo by Augustinian friars around 1788. The present structure was built on 1812 under the supervision of a botanist Fr. Manuel Blanco. It has single-aisled interior which offers an unobstructed view of the large main altar. The altar is massive, with six rounded columns encircling the image of Saint Joseph. Outside a multi-tiered belfry stands which was built in the latter part of the 19th century; a bridge offers passage to the church over the Malaquing Tubig River.

San Jose is also home to the Oblates of Saint Joseph Mission and its Minor Seminary, founded by the Saint Joseph Marello. The Oblates were the first Italian congregation to send missionaries to the Philippines. San Jose became their first foreign mission, and is the center of the Vicariate IV of the Archdiocese of Lipa.

San Jose celebrates Sinuam Festival every 25th day of April to commemorate its founding anniversary and to thank its patron for the good performance of the main business in the town which is Poultry.

Notable people[edit]

  • Querube C. Makalintal – Chief Justice of The Supreme Court (1973–1976), Speaker of the Batasang Pambansa (1978–1984) and Solicitor General (1954).
  • Jose C. Aguila – Division Superintendent of Schools (Abra, Nueva Vizcaya, La Union, Laguna, Pampanga, Batangas and Iloilo), first Filipino principal of Ilocos Norte National High School, Military Governor of Nueva Vizcaya in 1942 (Lt. Col. in the Fil-Am Guerilla Unit, USAFFE), served as a municipal treasurer in retirement. Assigned many San Jose residents to teaching posts in the various provinces he administered as superintendent for over twenty years.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Baconguis, Rowena T. (July 2007). "Extension Delivery System in a Layer and Swine-Based Farming Community: The Case of San Jose, Batangas" (PDF). Philippine Institute for Development Studies. Retrieved 10 December 2016. 
  2. ^ "Municipality". Quezon City, Philippines: Department of the Interior and Local Government. Retrieved 31 May 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Province: Batangas". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 12 November 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Census of Population (2015). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. PSA. Retrieved 20 June 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c "2016 National and Local Elections Statistics". Commission on Elections. 2016. 
  6. ^ "Municipal: San Jose, Batangas". PSGC Interactive. Quezon City, Philippines: Philippine Statistics Authority. Retrieved 8 January 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Census of Population and Housing (2010). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City, Municipality and Barangay. NSO. Retrieved 29 June 2016. 
  8. ^ Census of Population (1995, 2000 and 2007). "Region IV-A (Calabarzon)". Total Population by Province, City and Municipality. NSO. Archived from the original on 24 June 2011. 
  9. ^ "Province of Batangas". Municipality Population Data. Local Water Utilities Administration Research Division. Retrieved 17 December 2016. 
  10. ^ Yann Picand; Dominique Dutoit. "San Jose, Batangas : définition de San Jose, Batangas et synonymes de San Jose, Batangas (anglais)". Dictionnaire.sensagent.leparisien.fr. Retrieved 2016-12-10. 

External links[edit]