San Luis Valley Regional Airport

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San Luis Valley Regional Airport

Bergman Field
San Luis Valley Regional Airport.JPG
Terminal building
Summary
Airport typePublic
OwnerCity and County of Alamosa
ServesSan Luis Valley, Southern Colorado, Northern New Mexico
Location2490 State Avenue, Alamosa, Colorado 81101
Elevation AMSL7,539 ft / 2,298 m
Coordinates37°26′06″N 105°51′59″W / 37.43500°N 105.86639°W / 37.43500; -105.86639Coordinates: 37°26′06″N 105°51′59″W / 37.43500°N 105.86639°W / 37.43500; -105.86639
WebsiteALS Logo
Map
ALS is located in Colorado
ALS
ALS
ALS is located in the United States
ALS
ALS
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
2/20 8,519 2,597 Asphalt
Statistics
Aircraft operations5,670
Based aircraft41

San Luis Valley Regional Airport (IATA: ALS, ICAO: KALS, FAA LID: ALS) (Bergman Field) is two miles south of Alamosa, in Alamosa County, Colorado, United States.[1] It sees one airline, subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. The airport reached 10,000 enplanements for the first time in its EAS participation with Boutique Air and can now be classified as a non-hub primary airport.[2]

History[edit]

The airport was conceived in 1939 and construction began later that year. It was opened in early 1941. It is now owned by the City and County of Alamosa and is named for Carl A. Bergman (1908–1988), a local businessman and initial supporter of the airport. The first airline flights were Monarch DC-3s in 1946-47; successor Frontier pulled out its Convair 580s in 1982.

Facilities[edit]

The airport covers 1,700 acres (688 ha) at an elevation of 7,539 feet (2,298 m). It has one runway: 2/20 is 8,519 by 100 feet (2,597 x 30 m) asphalt .[1]

In the year ending January 1, 2011 the airport had 30,772 aircraft operations, average 84 per day: 73% general aviation, 23% air taxi, and 3% military. 44 aircraft were then based at the airport: 84% single-engine, 14% multi-engine, and 2% helicopter.[1] The airport is an uncontrolled airport that has no control tower.[3]

Airline and destination[edit]

Scheduled passenger service:

AirlinesDestinations
United Express Denver[4]

Statistics[edit]

Top destinations[edit]

Busiest domestic routes out of ALS
(August 2019 – July 2020) [5]
Rank City Passengers
1 Denver, CO 5,760
Passenger boardings (enplanements) by year, as per the FAA[6]
Year 2009 [7] 2010 [8] 2011 [9] 2012 [10] 2013[11] 2014[12] 2015[13] 2016[14] 2017[15] 2018[16] 2019[17]
Enplanements 6,279 6,737 7,104 6,959 6,983 3,920 3,105 3,863 6,494 7,125 10,044
Change Decrease012.32% Increase07.29% Increase05.45% Decrease02.04% Increase00.34% Decrease043.86% Decrease020.79% Increase024.41% Increase068.11% Increase09.72% Increase040.97%
Airline Great Lakes Airlines Great Lakes Airlines Great Lakes Airlines Great Lakes Airlines Great Lakes Airlines Great Lakes Airlines Great Lakes Airlines Great Lakes Airlines Boutique Air Boutique Air Boutique Air
Destination(s) Denver Denver Denver Denver Denver Denver
Farmington
Denver
Farmington
Denver Albuquerque
Denver
Denver Denver

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Form 5010 for ALS PDF. Federal Aviation Administration. Effective April 5, 2012.
  2. ^ "Alamosa airport flies to new heights". Alamosa News. Retrieved 2020-07-13.
  3. ^ https://www.airnav.com/airport/KALS
  4. ^ "United adds 5 regional routes from Denver / Houston in Oct 2020". Routes Online. August 2020. Retrieved August 25, 2020.
  5. ^ "RITA | BTS | Transtats". Transtats.bts.gov. Retrieved February 22, 2017.
  6. ^ "Passenger Boarding (Enplanement) and All-Cargo Data for U.S. Airports – Airports". www.faa.gov. Retrieved 2020-05-26.
  7. ^ "2009 Primary, Non-primary Commercial Service, and General Aviation Airports (by State)" (PDF, 891 KB). CY 2009 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data]. Federal Aviation Administration. November 23, 2010.
  8. ^ "2010 Primary, Non-primary Commercial Service, and General Aviation Airports (by State)" (PDF, 189 KB). CY 2010 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data]. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2011.
  9. ^ "2011 Enplanements at Primary, Non-primary Commercial Service, and General Aviation Airports (by State)" (PDF). CY 2011 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data]. Federal Aviation Administration. October 9, 2012.
  10. ^ "2012 Enplanements at All Airports (Primary, Non-primary Commercial Service, and General Aviation) by State and Airport" (PDF). CY 2012 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data]. Federal Aviation Administration. October 31, 2013.
  11. ^ "All Airports with CY 2013 Enplanements" (PDF). Retrieved May 25, 2020.
  12. ^ "Calendar Year 2014 Enplanements by State" (PDF).
  13. ^ "Calendar Year 2015 Enplanements by State" (PDF).
  14. ^ "Calendar Year 2016 Final Revenue Enplanements at All Airports" (PDF).
  15. ^ "Calendar Year 2017 Final Revenue Enplanements at All Airports" (PDF).
  16. ^ "Calendar Year 2016 Final Revenue Enplanements at All Airports" (PDF).
  17. ^ "Preliminary Calendar Year 2019 Enplanements at All Airports" (PDF).

Other sources[edit]

  • Essential Air Service documents (Docket OST-1997-2960) from the U.S. Department of Transportation:
    • Order 2006-7-19: selecting Great Lakes Aviation, Ltd. to provide subsidized essential air service (EAS) at Alamosa and Cortez, Colorado for two years, beginning August 1, 2006. Alamosa will receive three nonstop round trips to Denver each weekday and weekend (18 total round trips per week) at an annual subsidy rate of $1,150,268. Cortez will receive three nonstop round trips to Denver each weekday and weekend at an annual subsidy rate of $796,577. Each community will be served with 19-passenger Beech 1900-D aircraft.
    • Order 2008-5-34: reselecting Great Lakes Aviation, Ltd., d/b/a United Express, to provide essential air service (EAS) at annual subsidy rates of $1,853,475 at Alamosa, Colorado, and $1,295,562 at Cortez, through July 31, 2010.
    • Order 2010-7-5: selecting Great Lakes Aviation, Ltd., to continue providing subsidized essential air service (EAS) at Alamosa and Cortez, Colorado, for the two-year period beginning August 1, 2010, at the annual subsidy rates of $1,987,155 and $1,847,657, respectively.

External links[edit]