Sana Amanat

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Sana Amanat
Sana Amanat introduces Barack Obama.jpg
Amanat presenting President Barack Obama a copy of Ms. Marvel Vol. 1 at a reception for Women's History Month.
Born New Jersey, United States
Nationality American
Area(s) Editor
Notable works
Ms. Marvel, Captain Marvel

Sana Amanat is an American comic book creator and editor.[1][2] She is a director and editor at Marvel Comics, developing and managing creative content for the company's various publishing lines.[3] Her notable credits include Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man, and Captain Marvel. She co-created Marvel's first solo series to feature a Muslim female superhero, Ms. Marvel, which gained worldwide media attention.[4]

Early life[edit]

Amanat was born into a Pakistani family. She lived with her parents, who were Pakistani immigrants, in a predominantly white New Jersey suburb.[5] Throughout her childhood, Amanat had trouble fitting in and struggled with self-identity as she often wished to be white herself. She also idealized the beauty of women who were blonde and white.[5]

Career[edit]

Amanat studied political science with a focus on the Middle East at Barnard College at Columbia University in 2004.[6][7] After college, Amanat worked in magazine publishing until she landed a position with an indie comic book company. Two years later, the company went out of business, but Amanat felt confident with a fresh voice in a male-dominated field.[6]

Amanat joined Marvel Comics in 2009. Currently, she is the director of content and character development at Marvel Comics.[6] In 2014, she co-created Marvel's first solo series to feature a female Muslim superhero called Ms. Marvel.[8] While creating the comic, she drew on her own experience as the child of Pakistani immigrants in the New Jersey suburbs in hopes that the next generation will not experience identity rejection as she did through a relatable superhero. The comic spent several weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and also won the Hugo Award for Best Graphic Story in 2015.[6] Ms.Marvel sells much more digitally than in stores, has at times been Marvel's top digital seller overall.[9]

In her Ted Talk, Amanat states that "the big idea behind Ms.Marvel [was] very much about minority representation, the bigger idea was about finding your authentic self". Numerous young and ethnic letter writers were excited to see Kamala Khan who looked like them and came from a similar background.[6]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Ms. Marvel vol. 3 #1–19 (with G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, February 2014 – October 2015)
    • Volume 1: No Normal (tpb, 120 pages, 2014, ISBN 0-7851-9021-X) collects:
      • "Garden State of Mind" (with G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, in All-New Marvel NOW! Point One #1.NOW, 2014)
      • "Meta Morphosis" (with G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, in #1, 2014)
      • "All Mankind" (with G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, in #2, 2014)
      • "Side Entrance" (with G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, in #3, 2014)
      • "Past Curfew" (with G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, in #4, 2014)
      • "Urban Legend" (with G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, in #5, 2014)
    • Volume 2: Generation Why (tpb, 136 pages, 2015, ISBN 0-7851-9022-8) collects:
      • "Healing Factor" (with Jake Wyatt, in #6–7, 2014)
      • "Generation Why" (with G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, in #8–11, 2014–2015)
    • Volume 3: Crushed (tpb, 112 pages, 2015, ISBN 0-7851-9227-1) collects:
      • "Loki in Love" (with G.Willow Wilson and Elmo Bondoc, in #12, 2015)
      • "Crushed" (with G.Willow Wilson and Takeshi Miyazawa, in #13–15, 2015)
    • Volume 4: Last Days (tpb, 120 pages, 2015, ISBN 0-7851-9736-2) collects:
      • "Last Days" (with G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, in #16–19, 2015)
  • Ms. Marvel vol. 4 #1–... (November 2015 – present)
    • Volume 5: Super Famous (tpb, 136 pages, 2016, ISBN 0-7851-9611-0)
      • "Super Famous" (with G.Willow Wilson, Adrian Alphona and Takeshi Miyazawa, in #1–3, 2015–2016)
      • "Army of One" (with G.Willow Wilson and Nico Leon, in #4–6, 2016)
      • "The Road to War" (with G.Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, in #7, 2016)
      • "Civil War II" (with G.Willow Wilson, Adrian Alphona and Takeshi Miyazawa, in #8-11, 2016)
      • "The Road to War" (with G.Willow Wilson and Mirka Andolfo, in #12, 2016)
      • "Election Day" (with G.Willow Wilson and Mirka Andolfo, in #13, 2016)
      • "Damage Per Second" (with G.Willow Wilson, Takeshi Miyazawa, and Nelson Blake II, in #14-17, 2017)
      • "Meanwhile in Wakanda" (with G.Willow Wilson and Francesco Gaston, in #18, 2017)
      • "Mecca" (with G.Willow Wilson, Marco Failla, Nelson Blake II, and Valerio Schiti, in #19-22, 2017)
      • "Northeast Corridor" (with G.Willow Wilson, Diego Olortegui, and Valerio Schiti, in #23-24, 2017)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tahir, Sabaa (2014-02-04). "ESSAY: Why Muslim Ms. Marvel succeeds in her debut". Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-11-24. 
  2. ^ "Be The Hero: Get to Know Sana Amanat's Story". Makers. September 18, 2015. Retrieved 2017-11-24. 
  3. ^ "Sana Amanat | Comics | Marvel.com". marvel.com. Retrieved 2017-11-24. 
  4. ^ Robinson, Wills (November 6, 2013). "Marvel Comics brings back Ms Marvel as a 16-year-old Muslim". Mail Online. Retrieved 2017-11-24. 
  5. ^ a b Cavna, Michael (June 17, 2016). "The Pakistani American Marvel editor who is trying to make comic books more diverse". Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-11-24. 
  6. ^ a b c d e Thomson-DeVeaux, Amelia. "A New Kind of Superhero | Barnard College". barnard.edu. Retrieved 2017-11-24. 
  7. ^ Vera, Ruel S. De. "The marvel behind the new Ms. Marvel". Retrieved 2018-01-03. 
  8. ^ Robinson, Wills (November 6, 2013). "Marvel Comics brings back Ms Marvel as a 16-year-old Muslim". Mail Online. Retrieved 2017-11-24. 
  9. ^ Cocca, Carolyn (2016). Superwomen: Gender, Power, and Representation. Bloomsbury Academic. p. 183. ISBN 978-1501316579. 

External links[edit]