Sandbagging (grappling)

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Sandbagging is a term used in martial arts to denote a practitioner who competes at a skill-bracket deemed less rigorous than their actual level of competitive ability.[1][2] The term is adopted similarly in golf and various forms of racing. In contrast to these sports however, it remains unclear whether the grappling "sandbagger" necessarily does so intentionally.[3] For example, in Judo or Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, where competition is generally divided by belt rank, a practitioner is conventionally not allowed to choose his or her own ranking and thus must compete at a level predetermined by his or her instructor.[4]

Sandbagging prohibitions[edit]

Some officiating organizations attempt to proactively curb the occurrence of sandbagging. These actions range from simple rule restrictions, such as the International Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Federation prohibiting those with a Judo black belt from competing in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu white belt divisions, to organizations such as the North American Grappling Association employing a special tracking system designed to record competitors nationally and potentially re-assign them to a higher skill-level in NAGA events.[5][6]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Greenhill, Paul (2008). "Should You Have Sympathy For the Sandbagger?". Retrieved May 31, 2012.
  2. ^ "NO POINTS - NO POLITICS - NO SANDBAGGING Submit or Pin to Win!". A catch-as-catch-can wrestling promo mentioning sandbagging. Retrieved May 31, 2012.
  3. ^ "MASSIVE SHOUT-OUT TO 'ATOS VPF': BROWN, PURPLE & BLUES!". A blog post suggesting one might be an unintentional 'sandbagger'. July 4, 2010. Retrieved May 31, 2012.
  4. ^ "IBJJF Graduation System". Official IBJJF graduation system. Retrieved June 4, 2012.
  5. ^ "RULE BOOK GENERAL COMPETITION GUIDELINES COMPETITION FORMAT MANUAL" (PDF). Official IBJJF rulebook. Retrieved May 31, 2012.
  6. ^ "2009 Arnold World Grappling Championship". NAGA website discussing sandbagging in a promo. Retrieved May 31, 2012.