Sanger-Harris

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Sanger-Harris
Department store
Industry Retail
Fate merged with Foley's
Successor Foley's (1987-2005)
Macy's (2006-present)
Founded 1961
Defunct 1987
Headquarters Dallas, Texas
Products Clothing, footwear, bedding, furniture, jewelry, beauty products, and housewares.
Parent Federated Department Stores, Inc.

Sanger-Harris (or, Sanger Harris as it later appeared) was a department store chain from 1961 to 1987. It was formed by Federated Department Stores in 1961 from two Dallas, Texas chains, Sanger Brothers and A. Harris and Co., that dated from the 19th century. The firm was absorbed into Federated's Houston-based chain Foley's in 1987.

History[edit]

Sanger-Harris of Dallas, Texas, was the result of the 1961 merger of then four-unit Sanger Brothers Dry Goods Company of Dallas, founded in 1868 by the five Sanger brothers[1] and acquired by Federated Department Stores in 1951; and the two-unit A. Harris and Company of Dallas, founded in 1887 and acquired by Federated in 1961.

In 1965 the company built a new downtown Dallas store to replace the flagship stores of the two companies and, so the business legend goes, turned down the opportunity to move into a new shopping center called NorthPark Center. During the late 1970s, the chain dropped the hyphen between 'Sanger' and 'Harris' (rumored as a way to differentiate from hometown rival Neiman-Marcus), and continued as an upper-moderate shopping destination. In January 1987 it was merged into the Foley's division.

Architecture[edit]

Sanger-Harris stores are known for their iconic column and mosaic architecture. The first building to feature the iconic white columns and mosaic is the Downtown Dallas store. The Sanger-Harris branch stores that were built after 1965 all feature this iconic design. The mosaic is now hidden on Sanger-Harris Building in Downtown Dallas but the iconic white columns are still visible and the building is still a Downtown Dallas landmark. Most of the former Sanger-Harris branch stores still feature this iconic design today.

Locations[edit]

Downtown (flagship store)
Pacific and Akard St.
Dallas
1965-1987
(Foley's until 1990)
Foley's retained the Downtown Dallas flagship store until it closed in 1990; it is now the headquarters for Dallas Area Rapid Transit
Etching on pillar outside the former Sanger Harris downtown Dallas store location. This logo was used initially after the Sanger Brothers-A. Harris & Co. merger, prior to the eventual introduction of the one at the top right of this page. This etching was retained by DART.
Highland Park Village
Highland Park
1961-1987
(Sanger Bros. until 1961)
This location was retained by Foley's, the building was later a Sakowitz location, now it is a different store
Big Town
Mesquite
1961-1987
(Sanger Bros. until 1961)
This location closed after the Foley's merger; it was torn down when the mall was razed
Preston Center
Dallas
1961-1987
(Sanger Bros. until 1961) (Foley's until ?)
Foley's retained this location until they moved to NorthPark Center; now subdivided with multiple tenants
Plymouth Park
Irving
1961-1987
(Sanger Bros. until 1961)
This location was closed (Foley's moved to a former Joske's store at Irving Mall); the property was sold to a neighboring church and the building was later razed
Town East
Mesquite
1971-1987
(Foley's until 2006; Macy's to present)
Foley's retained this store, which is now a Macy's
Six Flags Mall
Arlington
Foley's ended up closing this location, which was torn down in late 2016 along with much of the mall property
Valley View Center
Dallas
1973-1987
(Foley's until 2006; Macy's until ?)
Foley's, and later Macy's retained this location initially, it has since closed and is being demolished as of 2017
A former Sanger Harris (later a Macy's) at Valley View Center in June 2012
Southwest Center
Dallas
1975-1987
(Foley's until 2006; Macy's until 2017)
This location was retained by Foley's and Macy's until 2017 when the store is due to close.

This store replaced a prior location near Kiest and I-35E which was sold to the Dallas Independent School District and currently operates as the Nolan Estes Educational Plaza

Hulen Mall
Fort Worth
1977-1987
(Foley's until 2006; Macy's to present)
This location was retained by Foley's and Macy's
North Hills Mall
North Richland Hills
1979-1987
(Foley's until ?)
Foley's closed this location when it moved to nearby North East Mall, building was torn down when mall property was razed
Collin Creek Mall
Plano
1980-1987
(Foley's until 2006; Macy's until 2017)
This location was retained by Foley's and Macy's until 2017 when the store is due to close
Sanger Harris Plaza
Tyler
1982-1987
(Foley's until 2006; Macy's until 2017)
This location was retained by Foley's and Macy's until 2017 when the store is due to close
Southroads
Tulsa
This location was retained by Foley's initially, but the store and mall were torn down and the property redeveloped; Foley's relocated to Promenade Mall across the street
Woodland Hills
Tulsa
 ?-1987
(Foley's until 2006; Macy's to present)
This location was retained by Foley's and Macy's
Crossroads
Oklahoma City
Foley's, and later Macy's retained this location, but it has since closed, now is vacant
Quail Springs
Oklahoma City
 ?-1987
(Foley's until 2006; Macy's until 2016)
Foley's, and later Macy's retained this location until 2016, now is closed
Foothills
Tucson
Retained by Foley's initially, later a Robinsons-May; mall now repurposed with outlets
El Con
Tucson
Retained by Foley's initially, later a Robinsons-May, then a Macy's, now demolished
Tucson Mall
Tucson
Retained by Foley's initially, later a Robinsons-May, now a Macy's
Coronado Center
Albuquerque
Foley's initially retained this store, later departed then returned to another space in the mall; now location is a JCPenney

In popular culture[edit]

  • In early episodes of Dallas, the downtown Dallas store was used for filming in two different storylines:
• When a lowly young woman agrees to give up her baby to Sue Ellen (played by Linda Gray), Sue Ellen visits a department store to shop for baby clothes and related items. Pam (Victoria Principal) sees Sue Ellen and wonders why she is there. Sue Ellen tries to pass it off as getting baby items to give to charity. Later Sue Ellen can be seen walking in front of the downtown Dallas store, with bags in her hand clearly displaying the Sanger Harris logo and design. Then, she goes to drop off the bags with the mother and finds J.R. (Larry Hagman) there instead.
• Pam decides she wants to work outside the home, visits "the store" for a job interview with friend Liz Craig (Barbara Babcock); the downtown Dallas store facade can clearly be seen as Pam approaches the front door of the store. After Pam snags the job, later views of the downtown Dallas store's side entrance on Akard St. can be seen used to introduce scenes of Pam at work.
  • In the 1986 movie True Stories, a fashion show takes place at the mall in Virgil, Texas. As the scene is about to begin, the camera pans by a mall's exterior. A Sanger-Harris store building can be seen, among others. This exterior actually belonged to Big Town Mall in Mesquite.
  • During Dallas showings of The Rocky Horror Picture Show, audience members would sing the Sanger-Harris jingle "You can always tell a Sanger Harris man". This was done when Dr. Frank-N-Furter came down the elevator in heels and fish net stockings.
  • Prank call comedian Lucius Tate often pretended to be a collection agent from Sanger-Harris when calling his victims.

See also[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Rosenberg, Leon Joseph (1978). Sangers': Pioneer Texas Merchants. Texas State Historical Association. ISBN 0-87611-037-5. 
  • Meyer, Lasker M. (2011). Foley's (Images of America). Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 0-7385-7928-9. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goldman, Kay. "Isaac Sanger." In Immigrant Entrepreneurship: German-American Business Biographies, 1720 to the Present, vol. 2, edited by William J. Hausman. German Historical Institute. Last modified July 25, 2012.

External links[edit]