Sanjak of Inebahti

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Sanjak of Inebahti
Ottoman Turkish: Liva-i Inebahti
Sanjak of the Ottoman Empire

 

1499–1821/1829
Location of Sanjak of Inebahti
Central Greece in the early 19th century, showing the sanjak of Inebahti ("Lepanto") in the lower image
Capital Naupaktos (Inebahti/Aynabahti, Lepanto)
History
 -  Established 1499
 -  Greek War of Independence 1821/1829
Today part of  Greece

The Sanjak of Inebahti or Aynabahti (Ottoman Turkish: Sancak-i/Liva-i İnebahtı/Aynabahtı; Greek: λιβάς/σαντζάκι Ναυπάκτου) was a second-level Ottoman province (sanjak or liva) encompassing the central parts of Continental Greece. Its name derives from its capital, Inebahti/Aynabahti, the Turkish name for Naupaktos, better known in English with its Italian name, Lepanto.[1]

History[edit]

The province was formed in 1499, when the Ottomans conquered Lepanto, which had been a possession of the Republic of Venice since 1407.[1] Much of the territory allocated to the new province, however, had already been under Ottoman control, under the Sanjak of Tirhala.

On 7 October 1571, the famous Battle of Lepanto between the fleets of the Ottoman Empire and the Holy League was fought off the coast of the town of Lepanto.[1] The Venetians retook the town in 1687, during the Morean War, but surrendered it to Turkish control in 1699, after the Treaty of Karlowitz.[1] Although most of the province rose in revolt upon the outbreak of the Greek War of Independence in 1821,[citation needed] the capital Lepanto remained in Ottoman hands until 12 March 1829, when it came under Greek control.[1]

Administrative division[edit]

Originally, the sanjak formed part of the Rumeli Eyalet, but after 1533 it was subordinated to the new Eyalet of the Archipelago.[2]

According to the 17th-century geographer Hajji Khalifa, the province encompassed six kazas ("districts"): Inebahti itself, Karavari (Kravara), Abukor (Apokouros), Olendirek/Olunduruk (Lidoriki), Gölhissar and Kerbenesh (Karpenisi).[3][4]

Early 19th-century sources report that the sanjak at the time formed part of the Morea Eyalet, and comprised again six kazas: Inebahti, Abukor, Olendirek/Olunduruk, Gölhissar, Kerbenesh and Patracik (Ypati).[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Babinger, Franz (1986). "Aynabakhti̊". The Encyclopedia of Islam, New Edition, Volume I: A–B. Leiden and New York: BRILL. p. 790. ISBN 90-04-08114-3. 
  2. ^ Birken, Andreas (1976). Die Provinzen des Osmanischen Reiches. Beihefte zum Tübinger Atlas des Vorderen Orients (in German) 13. Reichert. pp. 53, 103. ISBN 9783920153568. 
  3. ^ de Vaudoncourt, Guillaume (1816). Memoirs on the Ionian Islands, Considered in a Commercial, Political, and Military Point of View. London: Baldwin, Cradock and Joy. p. 161. 
  4. ^ Rumeli und Bosna, geographisch beschrieben, von Mustafa ben Abdalla Hadschi Chalfa. Aus dem Türkischen übersetzt von J. v. Hammer (in German). Vienna: Verlag des Kunst- und Industrie-Comptors. 1812. pp. 125–127. 
  5. ^ "Reisen ins Osmanische Reich". Jahrbücher der Literatur (in German) (Vienna: C. Gerold). 49–50: 22. 1830.