Sanski Most

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Sanski Most

Сански Мост
Masinski most - panoramio.jpg
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Hamzibegova Dzamija - panoramio.jpg
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Coat of arms of Sanski Most
Coat of arms
Sanski Most is located in Bosnia and Herzegovina
Sanski Most
Sanski Most
Location of Sanski Most
Coordinates: 44°46′N 16°40′E / 44.767°N 16.667°E / 44.767; 16.667Coordinates: 44°46′N 16°40′E / 44.767°N 16.667°E / 44.767; 16.667
Country Bosnia and Herzegovina
Entity Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina
CantonUna-Sana Canton
Subdivisions75
Government
 • MayorFaris Hasanbegović (SDA)
Area
 • Total781 km2 (302 sq mi)
Population
 (2013 Census)
 • Total41,475
 • Density53.10/km2 (137.5/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Area code(s)+387 37
Websitewww.sanskimost.gov.ba

Sanski Most (pronounced [sâːnskiː mɔ̂ːst]) is a town and municipality located in Una-Sana Canton of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, an entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is situated on the banks of Sana River in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina, in region of Bosanska krajina, between Prijedor and Ključ. As of 2013, it has a population of 41,475 inhabitants.

Geography[edit]

It is located on the Sana River in Bosanska Krajina, between Prijedor and Ključ. Administratively it is part of the Una-Sana Canton of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.

History[edit]

In 1878 the little town (varošica) of Sanski Most was described as Muslim by Croatian historian Vjekoslav Klaić.[1] From 1929 to 1941, Sanski Most was part of the Vrbas Banovina of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia.

During World War II it was part of the Axis Independent State of Croatia (NDH), where the fascist Ustaše regime committed the Genocide of the Serbs and the Holocaust. At the beginning of May 1941 in several villages south-east of Sanski Most (Kijevo, Tramošnja, Kozica, etc.) the first armed conflict between the Ustaše and insurgent Serbs occurred. The event is known as the Đurđevdan uprising. In August 1941 on the Eastern Orthodox Elijah's holy day, who is the patron saint of Bosnia and Herzegovina, between 2,800 and 5,500 Serbs from Sanski Most and the surrounding area were killed and thrown into pits which have been dug by victims themselves.[2] The State Anti-fascist Council for the National Liberation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (ZAVNOBiH) held its second meeting from 30 June to 2 July 1944 in the town; it declared the equality of Muslims (Bosniaks), Serbs and Croats.

During the Bosnian War, the town was controlled by the Army of Republika Srpska (Bosnian Serbs) and remained under its control until October 1995 when the Army of Bosnia and Herzegovina took over it during Operation Sana shortly before the end of the war.

In 1996, Serb-inhabited Oštra Luka was split from Sanski Most and ceded to the Republika Srpska entity.

Demographics[edit]

Population[edit]

Population of settlements – Sanski Most municipality
Settlement 1961. 1971. 1981. 1991. 2013.
Total 39,483 62,102 62,467 60,307 50,421
1 Brdari 539 443
2 Čaplje 1,420 1,264
3 Demiševci 498 440
4 Donji Kamengrad 2,344 2,336
5 Dževar 685 681
6 Fajtovci 369 362
7 Gorice 644 615
8 Gornji Kamengrad 1,387 1,311
9 Hrustovo 1,694 1,697
10 Husimovci 1,802 1,310
11 Kijevo 1,118 682
12 Krkojevci 304 361
13 Lukavice 606 486
14 Lušci Palanka 1,079 226
15 Modra 578 595
16 Naprelje 822 605
17 Okreč 1,104 1,021
18 Podbriježje 570 529
19 Podlug 650 550
20 Podvidača 679 275
21 Poljak 522 483
22 Sanski Most 8,682 14,027 17,144 19,745
23 Sasina 1,054 294
24 Šehovci 960 880
25 Skucani Vakuf 1,321 1,434
26 Stari Majdan 1,212 762
27 Tomina 1,513 1,107
28 Trnova 978 783
29 Vrhpolje 1,840 2,035

Ethnic composition[edit]

Ethnic composition – Sanski Most town
2013. 1991. 1981. 1971.
Total 19,745 (100,0%) 17,144 (100,0%) 14,027 (100,0%) 8,682 (100,0%)
Serbs 401 (2,37%) 7,831 (45,68%) 5,691 (40,57%) 3,410 (39,27%)
Bosniaks 15,930 (94,19%) 7,245 (42,26%) 6,067 (43,25%) 4,545 (52,34%)
Jugoslaveni 901 (5,255%) 1,504 (10,72%) 96 (1,10%)
Croats 177 (1,05%) 646 (3,768%) 523 (3,729%) 558 (6,42%)
Others 405 (2,39%) 521 (3,039%) 242 (1,725%) 73 (0,84%)
Ethnic composition – Sanski Most municipality
2013. 1991. 1981. 1971. 1961.
Total 50,421 (100,0%) 60,307 (100,0%) 62,467 (100,0%) 62,102 (100,0%) 39,483 (100,0%)
Bosniaks 38,344 (92,45%) 28,136 (46,65%) 27,083 (43,36%) 24,839 (40,00%) 12,350 (31.28%)
Serbs 1,837 (4,429%) 25,363 (42,06%) 26,619 (42,61%) 30,422 (48,99%) 19,156 (48.52%)
Croats 722 (1,741%) 4,322 (7,167%) 5,314 (8,507%) 6,307 (10,16%) 4,844 (12.27%)
Others 572 (1,379%) 1,239 (2,054%) 336 (0,538%) 213 (0,343%)
Yugoslavs 1,247 (2,068%) 2,936 (4,700%) 195 (0,314%) 3,014 (7.63%)
Roma 75 (0,120%) 12 (0,019%)
Montenegrins 50 (0,080%) 59 (0,095%)
Albanians 26 (0,042%) 22 (0,035%)
Slovenes 16 (0,026%) 23 (0,037%)
Macedonians 10 (0,016%) 8 (0,013%)
Hungarians 2 (0,003%) 2 (0,003%)

Economy[edit]

Employment Male Female Total Total Population Unemployment %
2014 3,384 1,363 4,747 50,421 53.91%[3]

There are several non-governmental organisations in Sanski Most. Center for Peacebuilding, in the local language "Centar za Izgradnju Mira (CIM)" has been active in the city since 2004. The "Fenix Center", Centar Fenix provides humanitarian aid to the persons in need in the local community. The organisation "Krajiška Suza" is providing care in medical, social, psychological, cultural and existential needs of people living in and around Sanski Most. Austrian manufacturer of exhaust pipes Remus has a manufacturing facility in Sanski Most that employs around 300 people.[4][5] Sanski Most was selected as one of the most successful local communities within the UNDP project that was financed by Swiss embassy.[6]

Sport[edit]

The football club of the town is NK Podgrmeč.

Gallery[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vjekoslav Klaić (1878). Bosna: podatci o zemljopisu i poviesti Bosne i Hercegovine. Naklad. "Matice Hrvatske". p. 192.
  2. ^ Mojzes, Paul (2011). Balkan Genocides: Holocaust and Ethnic Cleansing in the 20th Century. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield. p. 75-76. ISBN 9781442206632.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ "Remus to build a new production facility in Sanski Most". www.see-industry.com. Retrieved 2020-07-18.
  5. ^ "Remus Innovation will hire 300 workers in Sanski Most". Sarajevo Times. 2012-12-27. Retrieved 2020-07-18.
  6. ^ Fena. "Sanski Most privlači sve više investicija i ostvaruje veliki ekonomski napredak". Radio Sarajevo. Retrieved 2020-07-18.

External links[edit]