Samaná (town)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Santa Bárbara de Samaná)
Jump to: navigation, search
Samaná
Santa Bárbara de Samaná
Samaná neighborhood (2011)
Samaná neighborhood (2011)
Samaná is located in the Dominican Republic
Samaná
Samaná
Samaná in the Dominican Republic
Coordinates: 19°12′N 69°19′W / 19.200°N 69.317°W / 19.200; -69.317Coordinates: 19°12′N 69°19′W / 19.200°N 69.317°W / 19.200; -69.317
Country Dominican Republic
Province Samaná
Founded 1756
Municipality since 1865
Area[1]
 • Total 412.11 km2 (159.12 sq mi)
Elevation[2] 5 m (16 ft)
Population (2012)[3]
 • Total 108,179
 • Density 260/km2 (680/sq mi)
 • Demonym Samanés
Municipalities 3
Catholic church in Santa Bárbara de Samaná.

Samaná (old spelling: Xamaná), in full Santa Bárbara de Samaná, is a town and municipality in northeastern Dominican Republic and is the capital of Samaná Province. It is located on the northern coast of Samaná Bay. The town is an important tourism destination and is the main center for whale-watching tours in the Caribbean region.[4]

Geography[edit]

Samaná is located in a small plain close to the coast but, now, most of the town is in the hills that enclose the plain.

It is the largest municipality of the province. It has a total area of 412.11 km² (almost 49% of the total area of the province), including the three municipal districts that are part of the municipality.

Most of the territory is occupied by the Sierra de Samaná, a short mountain range with steep slopes but no high mountains. The highest mountain is Monte Mesa (605 m).[2]

Population[edit]

The demonym for the inhabitants of Samaná, both the city and the province, is samanés (men and women). It is also possible to use samanense.

History[edit]

On 13 January 1493, Columbus made his last stop of this voyage in the New World. He landed on the Samaná Peninsula, where he met the hostile Ciguayos who presented him with his only violent resistance during his first voyage to the Americas. The Ciguayos had refused to trade the amount of bows and arrows that Columbus desired; in the ensuing violence two were stabbed to death.[46] Because of this and because of the Ciguayos' use of arrows, he called the inlet where he met them the Bay of Arrows (or Gulf of Arrows).[51] Today, the place is called the Bay of Rincón, in Samaná, the Dominican Republic.[52] Columbus kidnapped about 10 to 25 natives and took them back with him (only seven or eight of the native Indians arrived in Spain alive, but they made quite an impression on Seville). The city was founded in 1756 as Santa Bárbara de Samaná during the colonial period by the Spanish governor Francisco Rubio y Peñaranda. Families from the Canary Islands were brought to live in this city and Sabana de la Mar.

It was named Santa Bárbara after the Queen Bárbara de Braganza, wife of King Ferdinand VI of Spain. In 1824, the Turtle Dove, a sailing vessel, was blown ashore at Samana. Dozens of American Slaves from the Freemen Sisters' underground railroad escaped to these shores. They settled in Samana, and today, their descendants still live on that island.

With the creation of the Samaná Maritime District (an old division similar to a province) in 1865, the city was elevated to the category of municipality.

Economy[edit]

Santa Bárbara de Samaná

The main economic activities of the municipality are tourism, agriculture and fishing.

The largest boost to local economy takes place in Jan-March with the annual migration of thousands of North Atlantic humpback whales that come to the Samaná Bay to give birth. Samaná is the center of the country's tourism during these months.

Cayo Levantado in Samaná

Since 2006, cruise ships have been visiting Samaná. Over 100 ships have visited during recent years with close to 100 ships visiting during the cruise ship season of October 2010- August 2011. The season 2011 to 2012 will take a dip and only see around 50 cruise ships scheduled but will increase sharply back up to close to 80 ships scheduled during the season for 2012 to 2013.

Climate[edit]

The mean annual rainfall in Samaná is 2,349.8 mm and the mean annual temperature is 26.5°C.

Climate data for Samaná (1961-1990)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 33.0
(91.4)
34.0
(93.2)
36.0
(96.8)
36.0
(96.8)
35.2
(95.4)
37.0
(98.6)
39.2
(102.6)
37.0
(98.6)
37.0
(98.6)
38.5
(101.3)
36.0
(96.8)
35.0
(95)
39.2
(102.6)
Average high °C (°F) 29.2
(84.6)
29.5
(85.1)
30.2
(86.4)
30.7
(87.3)
31.5
(88.7)
32.5
(90.5)
32.6
(90.7)
32.7
(90.9)
32.6
(90.7)
32.2
(90)
30.6
(87.1)
29.6
(85.3)
31.2
(88.2)
Average low °C (°F) 19.1
(66.4)
19.3
(66.7)
19.9
(67.8)
20.6
(69.1)
21.8
(71.2)
22.8
(73)
23.1
(73.6)
23.0
(73.4)
22.7
(72.9)
22.2
(72)
20.6
(69.1)
19.6
(67.3)
21.2
(70.2)
Record low °C (°F) 15.0
(59)
15.0
(59)
14.5
(58.1)
16.0
(60.8)
16.0
(60.8)
19.0
(66.2)
19.0
(66.2)
19.0
(66.2)
19.0
(66.2)
18.5
(65.3)
17.0
(62.6)
15.5
(59.9)
14.5
(58.1)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 145.7
(5.736)
109.5
(4.311)
116.6
(4.591)
141.8
(5.583)
231.5
(9.114)
152.2
(5.992)
185.1
(7.287)
229.2
(9.024)
193.3
(7.61)
246.9
(9.72)
257.2
(10.126)
202.9
(7.988)
2,211.9
(87.083)
Average rainy days (≥ 1.0 mm) 15.6 11.7 10.5 9.9 15.0 13.7 16.7 17.7 15.7 17.2 18.5 17.6 179.8
Source: NOAA[5]

Notable people[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Superficies a nivel de municipios, Oficina Nacional de Estadistica
  2. ^ a b De la Fuente, Santiago (1976). Geografía Dominicana (in Spanish). Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic: Editora Colegial Quisqueyana. 
  3. ^ Censo 2012 de Población y Vivienda, Oficina Nacional de Estadistica
  4. ^ http://www.footprinttravelguides.com/latin-america/caribbean-islands/essentials/sport-and-activities/whale-and-dolphin-watching/
  5. ^ "Climate Normals for Samana 1961-1990". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved May 12, 2013. 
  6. ^ Vega, Bernardo (2004). Breve historia de Samaná (in Spanish). Santo Domingo: Fundación Cultural Dominicana. p. 23. ISBN 99934-27-06-3. 

External links[edit]