Santa Claus' daughter

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Santa Claus' daughter is a fictional character of Christmas folklore who appeared in North America in the late 19th century.

History[edit]

One of the first works to present this figure was a short musical play of 1892 called Santa Claus' Daughter (by Everett Elliott and F. W. Hardcastle). In this piece, the young Kitty Claus, who has known no one but her papa, asks him to find her a man.[1]

Books[edit]

In his book, NOEL (2000) Ed McCray told the life story of the Clauses' daughter, Noel.

Bestselling novelist James Patterson, wrote a book in 2004 for young audiences about Santa's daughter Chrissie. Chrissie spends her days playing with reindeer and elves. Until one day when the Big Boss of the Exmas Express company, Warrie Ransom, arrives and declares that "EVERYTHING IS FOR SALE" -- including Christmas! With the North Pole run by Exmas Express, work is 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Spirits sink so low that poor Santa can't even get himself out of bed. But come Christmas Eve, someone has to make sure that children everywhere wake up to their gifts under the tree. It's Chrissie's memory of her father's own magical words that gives her the courage to save the day.

In The Legend of Holly Claus (2006, by Brittney Ryan), Santa and Mrs. Claus enjoy a miraculous birth, but because of a terrible curse, the heart of their daughter is frozen.[2]

Television[edit]

In recent years, Santa Claus' daughter has notably featured in a number of television films where she is often trying to help or to escape her father.

Comics[edit]

Music[edit]

A number of female singers have used Santa girl or Santa's daughter costumes for clips or shows. Among them are:

Film[edit]

Other cultures[edit]

For many Slavs, Ded Moroz (the equivalent of Santa Claus) is accompanied by Snegurochka, his daughter or granddaughter.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Elliott, Everett and Hardcastle (March 27, 1892). "Santa Claus'daughter". Clyde, O. – via Internet Archive.
  2. ^ "The Legend of Holly Claus". www.goodreads.com.
  3. ^ Zappia, Robert (director) (October 20, 2007). Christmas is Here Again (Motion picture). United States: Screen Media Films.