Santana Tour

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Santana Tour
Tour by Santana
Santana 1970 Poster.jpg
A poster advertising two shows on March 6, 1970 at the University of Nevada Gym in Reno, Nevada.
Associated albumSantana
Start dateJanuary 10, 1969 (1969-01-10)
End dateJune 28, 1970 (1970-06-28)
Legs4
No. of shows173 in North America
9 in Europe
182 in total
Santana concert chronology

The Santana Tour was the first concert tour by the American rock band Santana.

History[edit]

1969 marked the first year Santana entered the mainstream, thanks to the group's appearance at the Woodstock festival, where drummer Michael Shrieve, aged 20,[1] was one of the youngest musicians to play at the festival, and the success of their self-titled debut album. They performed nearly non-stop in the United States during that year, appearing at several large music festivals such as the Texas International Pop Festival and the Altamont Speedway Free Festival.[2] During that year, the group's lineup was finalized, Carlos Santana on guitar, percussion, and vocals, David Brown on bass guitar, Gregg Rolie on Hammond organ and lead vocals, Michael Carabello on congas, José Areas on timbales, congas, and trumpet, and Shrieve on drums. In 1970, the group toured Europe (as well as playing at the Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music) and they played in Canada for the first time.[3]

Live releases[edit]

Live material from this tour has appeared on a number of different releases:

  • The group's set at the Woodstock festival on August 16, 1969 has appeared on the following releases:
  • The group's performance on The Ed Sullivan Show was released on the video Viva Santana! An Intimate Conversation With Carlos Santana.
  • "Incident at Neshabur", "Soul Sacrifice", and "A Super Jam!" (with the Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane) from the show on February 4, 1970 was released on the 2005 video A Night at the Family Dog. Plus, "Incident at Neshabur" was released on the video Viva Santana! An Intimate Conversation With Carlos Santana.
  • The band's performance in London on April 18, 1970 has appeared on the following releases:
    • "Se a Cabo", "Toussaint L'Overture", "Black Magic Woman", and "Gypsy Queen" were released on the 1998 remastered edition of Abraxas.
    • "Gumbo" and "Soul Sacrifice" were released on the 2001 video Legends of Rock: Live in Concert at the Royal Albert Hall.
  • "Jin-go-lo-ba" and "Treat" from the band's performance on the German TV show Beat-Club on June 22, 1970 appeared on the following releases:
    • "Jin-go-lo-ba" was released on the 1987 video Casey Kasem's Rock N' Roll Goldmine: The San Francisco Sound.
    • "Treat" was released on the video Viva Santana! An Intimate Conversation With Carlos Santana.
  • "Gumbo", "Savor", and "Jin-go-lo-ba" from the band's performance at the Kralingen Music Festival in the Netherlands was released on the 1971 film Stamping Ground and the live album of the same name.

Tour band[edit]

Typical set lists[edit]

January 1969—April 1970: North American tour[edit]

Known as the Santana Blues Band up around March 1969, the band performed extensively during this tour, playing at mostly high schools, colleges, clubs, small music venues, fairgrounds, and large rock festivals such as Woodstock throughout. The tour began at January 10, 1969 at The TNT in Olympic Valley, California and ended on April 12, 1970 at the Fillmore East in New York City. A typical set list from 1969 was as follows (all songs written by the members of Santana unless specified otherwise).[10]

  1. "Waiting" (Carlos Santana)
  2. "Evil Ways" (Clarence "Sonny" Henry)
  3. "Savor"
  4. "Treat"
  5. "You Just Don't Care"
  6. "Jin-go-lo-ba" (Babatunde Olatunji)
  7. "Persuasion"
  8. "Soul Sacrifice" (Santana, Gregg Rolie, David Brown, Marcus Malone)

A typical set list from 1970 (all songs written by the members of Santana unless specified otherwise) was as follows (actual set list taken from the first or second show on April 12):[11]

  1. "Se Acabó" (José Areas)
  2. "Black Magic Woman" (Peter Green)
  3. "Gypsy Queen" (Gábor Szabó)
  4. "Savor"
  5. "Jin-go-lo-ba" (Olatunji)
  6. "Oye Como Va" (Tito Puente)
  7. "Hope You're Feeling Better" (Rolie)
  8. "Toussaint L'Overture"
  9. "Evil Ways" (Henry)
  10. "Persuasion"
  11. "Soul Sacrifice" (Santana, Rolie, Brown, Malone)
  12. "Treat"

April 1970: One show in England[edit]

On April 18, 1970, the band did one show in England for The Sound of the Seventies festival at the Royal Albert Hall in London, their first show in Europe and their first show outside North America. These are the songs known to have been performed there are (all songs written by the members of Santana unless specified otherwise):[12]

  1. "Se Acabó" (Areas)
  2. "Toussaint L'Overture"
  3. "Black Magic Woman" (Green)
  4. "Gypsy Queen" (Szabó)
  5. "Gumbo" (Santana, Rolie)
  6. "Soul Sacrifice" (Santana, Rolie, Brown, Malone)

April—June 1970: Second North American tour[edit]

A short North American tour followed the gig in England, lasting from April 24, 1970 at the Memorial Hall in Allentown, Pennsylvania and ending on June 13, 1970 at the Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, New York. Taken from the show on May 22 at the Waikiki Shell in Honolulu, a typical set list from this tour was as follows (all songs written by the members of Santana unless specified otherwise):[13]

  1. "Se Acabó" (Areas)
  2. "Black Magic Woman" (Green)
  3. "Gypsy Queen" (Szabó)
  4. "Savor"
  5. "Jin-go-lo-ba" (Olatunji)
  6. "Oye Como Va" (Puente)
  7. "Toussaint L'Overture"
  8. "Evil Ways" (Henry)
  9. "Treat"
  10. "Gumbo" (Santana, Rolie)
  11. "Waiting" (Santana)
  12. "Hope You're Feeling Better" (Rolie)
  13. "Conquistadore Rides Again" (Chico Hamilton)

June 1970: European tour[edit]

The group embarked on a short, 8-date European tour in June 1970, which commenced on June 16, 1970 at the Royal Albert Hall in London, England and concluded on June 28, 1970 at the Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music at the Royal Bath and West Showground in Shepton Mallet, England. This set list is representative of the show on June 28.[14] It does not represent all concerts for the duration of the tour.

All songs written by the members of Santana unless specified otherwise.

  1. "Se Acabó" (Areas)
  2. "Black Magic Woman" (Green)
  3. "Gypsy Queen" (Szabó)
  4. "Savor"
  5. "Jin-go-lo-ba" (Olatunji)
  6. "Oye Como Va" (Puente)
  7. "Incident at Neshabur" (Alberto Gianquinto, Santana)
  8. "Toussaint L'Overture"
  9. "Evil Ways" (Henry)
  10. "Persuasion"
  11. "Soul Sacrifice" (Santana, Rolie, Brown, Malone)
  12. "Gumbo" (Santana, Rolie)

Tour dates[edit]

Date City Country Venue
North America
January 10, 1969 Olympic Valley United States The TNT
January 11, 1969
January 17, 1969 Santa Barbara Robertson Gymnasium
February 11, 1969 Woodside Woodside High School
February 13, 1969 San Francisco Fillmore West
February 14, 1969
February 15, 1969
February 16, 1969
February 21, 1969 Santa Barbara Earl Warren Showgrounds
February 25, 1969 San Francisco Fillmore West
February 28, 1969 Vallejo The Dream Bowl
March 1, 1969
March 1, 1969 Santa Barbara Earl Warren Showgrounds
March 7, 1969 San Jose James Lick High School
March 8, 1969 Fremont Washington High School
March 12, 1969 San Francisco Avalon Ballroom
March 14, 1969 San Jose Santa Clara County Fairgrounds
March 15, 1969 Pleasant Hill Diablo Valley College Gym
March 21, 1969 San Francisco Avalon Ballroom
March 22, 1969
March 23, 1969
March 26, 1969
March 28, 1969 San Mateo CSM Gym
March 29, 1969 Las Vegas Las Vegas Ice Palace
April 1, 1969 Walnut Creek Las Lomas High School
April 3, 1969[a] San Jose Santa Clara County Fairgrounds
April 4, 1969[a]
April 5, 1969[a]
April 11, 1969 Pasadena Rose Palace
April 12, 1969
April 18, 1969 San Pablo Contra Costa College Gym
May 3, 1969 Seattle Hec Edmundson Pavilion
May 9, 1969 Pasadena Rose Palace
May 10, 1969[b] Stockton Pacific Memorial Stadium
May 11, 1969 San Diego Aztec Bowl
May 15, 1969 San Francisco Fillmore West
May 16, 1969
May 17, 1969
May 18, 1969
May 24, 1969[c] San Jose Santa Clara County Fairgrounds
May 25, 1969[c]
May 28, 1969 San Francisco Winterland Ballroom
May 29, 1969[d] Fresno Exhibit Hall
May 30, 1969[e] Merced Merced County Fairgrounds
June 10, 1969 Palo Alto Palo Alto High School
June 14, 1969 South Lake Tahoe The Fun House
June 20, 1969 San Francisco Fillmore West
June 21, 1969
(2 shows)
Salt Lake City Terrace Ballroom
June 28, 1969 San Diego San Diego International Sports Center
July 3, 1969 South Lake Tahoe The Fun House
July 4, 1969
July 5, 1969
July 11, 1969 San Francisco Fillmore West
July 12, 1969
July 13, 1969
July 19, 1969 Monterey Monterey Peninsula College Gymnasium
July 21, 1969 Concord Concord Armory
July 25, 1969[f] Woodinville Gold Creek Park
July 26, 1969[f]
July 30, 1969[g] Los Angeles The Century Plaza Hotel
August 1, 1969 New York City Fillmore East
August 2, 1969
August 3, 1969[h] Hamilton Township Atlantic City Race Track
August 8, 1969[i] Queens New York State Pavilion
August 9, 1969[i]
August 10, 1969 New York City Sheep Meadow
August 11, 1969 Stony Brook Stony Brook Student Activities Center
August 16, 1969[j] Bethel Yasgur Farms
August 18, 1969 Philadelphia Electric Factory
August 19, 1969
August 21, 1969 Boston Boston Tea Party
August 22, 1969
August 23, 1969
August 29, 1969 Bryn Mawr The Main Point
August 31, 1969[k] Lewisville Dallas International Motor Speedway
September 1, 1969[l] Prairieville Louisiana International Speedway
September 3, 1969 Grand Rapids Civic Auditorium
September 4, 1969 San Francisco Fillmore West
September 5, 1969
September 6, 1969
September 7, 1969
September 9, 1969 St. Louis N/A
September 10, 1969 Kansas City
September 11, 1969 Omaha
September 13, 1969 Sacramento Sacramento Memorial Auditorium
September 20, 1969 Los Angeles Hollywood Bowl
September 26, 1969 San Jose Santa Clara County Fairgrounds
September 27, 1969 Santa Rosa Santa Rosa Fairgrounds
October 1, 1969 Oakland Oakland Civic Auditorium
San Francisco Fillmore West
October 2, 1969
October 3, 1969 Winterland Ballroom
October 4, 1969
October 4, 1969[m] Amador County Lake Amador
October 9, 1969 Hayward Pioneer Gym
October 10, 1969 Fresno Exhibit Hall
October 11, 1969 Cincinnati Xavier University Fieldhouse
October 16, 1969 Minneapolis New City Opera House
October 17, 1969 Chicago Kinetic Playground
October 18, 1969
October 19, 1969
October 21, 1969
(2 shows)
Cincinnati Ludlow Garage
October 22, 1969
October 24, 1969[n] New York City Ed Sullivan Theater
October 24, 1969 Detroit Eastown Theatre
October 25, 1969
October 31, 1969[o] Philadelphia Philadelphia Convention Hall and Civic Center
November 1, 1969[o]
November 2, 1969 Pittsburgh Civic Arena
November 7, 1969
(2 shows)
New York City Fillmore East
November 8, 1969
(2 shows)
November 9, 1969 Washington, D.C. N/A
November 13, 1969 Cambridge The Ark
November 14, 1969
November 15, 1969
November 16, 1969 Rindge Franklin Pierce College
November 21, 1969 Detroit Eastown Theatre
November 22, 1969
November 23, 1969
(2 shows)
Milwaukee Captain Frederick Pabst Theater
November 26, 1969 Denver Denver Coliseum
November 27, 1969 Salt Lake City Salt Palace
November 28, 1969 Dallas Dallas Memorial Auditorium
November 29, 1969 Phoenix Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum
December 6, 1969[p] Tracy Altamont Speedway
December 18, 1969 San Francisco Winterland Ballroom
December 19, 1969
December 20, 1969
December 21, 1969
December 27, 1969[q] Pembroke Pines Miami-Hollywood Motorsports Park
December 29, 1969[q]
December 31, 1969 San Francisco Fillmore West
January 16, 1970
(2 shows)
New York City Fillmore East
January 17, 1970
(2 shows)
February 4, 1970 San Francisco Family Dog on the Great Highway
February 6, 1970[r] Berkeley Berkeley Community Theatre
February 23, 1970 San Francisco Winterland Ballroom
February 26, 1970 Fresno Selland Arena
February 27, 1970 Ventura Ventura College
February 28, 1970
(2 shows)
Santa Monica Santa Monica Civic Auditorium
March 6, 1970
(2 shows)
Reno University of Nevada Gym
March 7, 1970 San Jose Santa Clara County Fairgrounds
March 13, 1970 Lancaster Mayser Center
March 14, 1970 Philadelphia Electric Factory
March 15, 1970
(2 shows)
Boston Boston Tea Party
March 19, 1070 Atlanta Municipal Auditorium
March 21, 1970 Tampa Curtis Hixon Hall
March 29, 1970 Vancouver Canada PNE Agrodome
April 10, 1970
(2 shows)
New York City United States Fillmore East
April 11, 1970
(2 shows)
April 12, 1970
(2 shows)
Europe
April 18, 1970[s] London England Royal Albert Hall
North America
April 24, 1970 Allentown United States Memorial Hall
April 26, 1970[t] Kingston Frank W. Keaney Gymnasium
May 15, 1970 Cleveland Allen Theatre
May 16, 1970
(2 shows)
Toronto Canada Massey Hall
May 22, 1970 Honolulu United States Waikiki Shell
May 23, 1970
June 11, 1970 Philadelphia Spectrum
June 12, 1970 Port Chester Capitol Theatre
June 13, 1970
(2 shows)
Europe
June 16, 1970 London England Royal Albert Hall
June 19, 1970 Lyceum Ballroom
June 20, 1970[u] Montreux Switzerland Montreux Casino
June 21, 1970 Hamburg West Germany N/A
June 22, 1970[v] Bremen WDR TV Studios
June 23, 1970 Copenhagen Denmark Tivolis Koncertsal
June 26, 1970[w] Rotterdam Netherlands Kralingse Bos
June 28, 1970[x] Shepton Mallet England Royal Bath and West Showground

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c The concerts on April 3–5, 1969 were apart of the Teen Expo '69.
  2. ^ The concert on May 10, 1969 was apart of the Pacific Pop Festival.
  3. ^ a b The concerts on May 24–25, 1969 were apart of the Northern California Folk-Rock Festival II.
  4. ^ The concert on May 29, 1969 was apart of the Sounds of the City.
  5. ^ The concert on May 30, 1969 was apart of the Memorial Day Rock Festival.
  6. ^ a b The concerts on July 25–26, 1969 were apart of the Seattle Pop Festival.
  7. ^ The concert on July 30, 1969 was apart of the CBS Convention.
  8. ^ The concert on August 3, 1969 was apart of the Atlantic City Pop Festival.
  9. ^ a b The concerts on August 8–9, 1969 were apart of the Singer Bowl Music Festival.
  10. ^ The concert on August 16, 1969 was apart of the Woodstock Music & Arts Fair.
  11. ^ The concert on August 31, 1969 was apart of the Texas International Pop Festival.
  12. ^ The concert on September 1, 1969 was apart of the New Orleans Pop Festival.
  13. ^ The second concert on October 4, 1969 was apart of the Gold Rush Festival.
  14. ^ The concert on October 24, 1969 was for The Ed Sullivan Show.
  15. ^ a b The concerts on October 31–November 1, 1969 was apart of the 3rd Annual Quaker City Rock Festival.
  16. ^ The concert on December 6, 1969 was apart of the Altamont Speedway Free Festival.
  17. ^ a b The concerts on December 27 and 29, 1969 were apart of the Miami Rock Festival.
  18. ^ The concert on February 6, 1970 was apart of the Black Panther Party Legal Defense Fund Benefit.
  19. ^ The concert on April 18, 1970 was apart of The Sound of the Seventies.
  20. ^ The concert on April 26, 1970 was apart of the Gansett Tribal Rock Festival.
  21. ^ The concert on June 20, 1970 was apart of the Montreux Jazz Festival.
  22. ^ The concert on June 22, 1970 was for Beat-Club.
  23. ^ The concert on June 26, 1970 was apart of the Kralingen Music Festival.
  24. ^ The concert on June 28, 1970 was apart of the Bath Festival of Blues and Progressive Music '70.

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ "Michael Shrieve". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2019-07-24.
  2. ^ "Search for setlists: santana 1969 | setlist.fm". Setlist.fm. Retrieved 2019-06-21.
  3. ^ "Search for setlists: santana 1970 | setlist.fm". Setlist.fm. Retrieved 2019-06-21.
  4. ^ a b Santana 2014, p. 202
  5. ^ Santana 2014, p. 204
  6. ^ Santana 2014, p. 205
  7. ^ Santana 2014, p. 206
  8. ^ Santana 2014, p. 207
  9. ^ Santana 2014, p. 208
  10. ^ "Santana Average Setlists of year: 1969 | setlist.fm". Setlist.fm. Retrieved 2019-06-21.
  11. ^ "Santana Concert Setlist at Fillmore East, New York on April 12, 1970 | setlist.fm". Setlist.fm. Retrieved 2019-08-20.
  12. ^ "Santana Concert Setlist at Royal Albert Hall, London on April 18, 1970 | setlist.fm". Setlist.fm. Retrieved 2019-08-20.
  13. ^ "Santana Concert Setlist at Waikiki Shell, Honolulu on May 22, 1970 | setlist.fm". Setlist.fm. Retrieved 2019-08-20.
  14. ^ "Santana Concert Setlist at Bath Festival 1970, Bath on June 28, 1970 | setlist.fm". Setlist.fm. Retrieved 2019-08-04.

Bibliography

External links[edit]