Santiago (name)

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Santiago, (also San Iago, San Tiago, Santyago, Sant-Yago, San Thiago) is a Spanish name that derives from the Hebrew name Jacob (Ya'akov) via "Sant Iago", "Sant Yago", "Santo Iago", or "Santo Yago", first used to denote Saint James the Great, the brother of John the Apostle.[1] It was also the tradition that Saint James (Santiago) had travelled to the Iberian Peninsula during his life and was buried there. The name is also complicated in Spanish in that Jaime and Jacobo are modern versions of James.

Variants of Santiago include Iago (a common Galician language name), and Thiago or Tiago (a common Portuguese language name). The common name James has many forms in Iberia, including Xacobo or Xacobe (in Galician), Jaume, Xaume, Jaime, Jacobo, and Diego (in Spanish). Despite being a cognate, San Diego does not refer to Saint James but to Saint Didacus of Alcalá.

"Santi" is the nickname for Santiago, although "Sandy" is frequently used in English-speaking countries.

People named Santiago[edit]

Fictional characters[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ New York, E. P. Dutton, 1957, OCLC 28087235; reprinted by the Univ. of California Press in 1965 (OCLC 477436336) and published in Spanish translation in 1958 with the somewhat different title of El camino de Santiago: las peregrinaciones al sepulcro del Apóstol, trans. Amando Lázaro Ros, Madrid, Aguilar, 1958, OCLC 432856567. Both the English original and the translation have been republished.