Sapsali

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Sapsaree (삽살이)
Korea-Jeonju-Sapsal dog in front of a Hanok Village-01.jpg
Other namesSapsal Gae
Sapsaree
Common nicknamesExorcising Dog
Ghost hunting clever Dog
OriginSouth Korea
Breed statusNot recognized as a breed by any major kennel club.
Dog (domestic dog)
Sapsali
Hangul
Revised RomanizationSapsali Sapsalgae
McCune–ReischauerSapsali Sapsalkae

The Sapsali (삽살이) is a shaggy South Korean breed of dog. The word is followed in Korean by either gae (meaning "dog") or the suffix ee / i, but is also romanized as "Sapsaree".

Description[edit]

The Sapsali, just like the Jindo, was designated as a National Treasure (No.368) in 1992 by the South Korean government.[citation needed]

Appearance[edit]

The Sapsali has been called as a "lion dog" for its bulky and strong upper body and its large and imposing paws. Most of the Sapsali is medium-sized and slightly tall. Its adult coat is long and abundant, and comes in various colors, including solid and/or mixed shades of black, golden yellowish-blonde, reddish-orange, browns, and salt-and-pepper greys. Its hair falls over the eyes in the same manner as that of the Old English Sheepdog.[citation needed]

Temperament[edit]

The Sapsali's friendly outer appearance is matched by its innate patience and congeniality towards other animals and human beings. They are known to be playful in a group setting and have long been acknowledged and valued for their loyalty.[citation needed]

Height and weight[edit]

Male: 50–60 cm (20–24 in) / 18–27 kg (40-60 lbs)
Female: 48–58 cm (19–23 in) / 16–25 kg (35-55 lbs)[citation needed]

History[edit]

Kim Duryang-Sapsalgae-1743.jpg

The breed were slaughtered in large numbers by the Japanese when Korea was under Japanese rule to make winter coats for its military in Manchuria.[1] Near extinction in the mid-1980s, the breed was revived using the eight remaining dogs.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Man Saves Rare Sasparee Dog Breed From Extinction". Global Animal. September 27, 2011.

External links[edit]