Sara Davidson

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Sara Davidson
Born 1943 (age 73–74)[1]
United States
Occupation Novelist, journalist,[2] producer
Alma mater University of California, Berkeley[2]
Notable works Loose Change[3]
Website
saradavidson.com

Sara Davidson (born 1943)[1] is a journalist, novelist, and screenwriter.[2] She is the author of the best-selling Loose Change.[3]

Personal[edit]

In 1968, she was briefly married to NYC popular-music radio deejay Jonathan Schwartz. A second marriage—to a Los Angeles businessman—produced a son and a daughter, but also ended in divorce.[4] Her 1990s affair with "real-life cowboy" Richard Goff was the basis for her largely autobiographical novel Cowboy in 1999.[5]

Education[edit]

Davidson graduated from University of California, Berkeley;[2] also attended Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Journalist[edit]

Davidson's first job was as a reporter with the Boston Globe.[2] She has also written for magazines including The Atlantic Monthly,[6] Esquire.[6] Harper's Magazine,[1][6][7] Life,[6] McCall's,[6] Ms.,[6] The New York Times Magazine,[6] Newsweek,[7][8] O, The Oprah Magazine,[7][9] Ramparts[6] and Rolling Stone.[6]

Books[edit]

Television[edit]

In addition to having her novel Loose Change adapted for a mini-series, Davidson wrote and produced a number of television series. She created the series Jack and Mike,[20] and HeartBeat.[21] She was the co-executive producer for Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.[22]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Davidson, Sara (1943–)". Harper's Magazine. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Wakefield, Dan (2007-02-25). "Finding a new way forward". The Boston Globe. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  3. ^ a b Harmetz, Aljean (1978-04-20). "Mini-series offer big gambles and rewards". The Ledger. Lakeland, Florida. p. 9B. Archived from the original on 2013-01-24. Retrieved 2009-06-07. "Loose Change," based on a best-selling book by Sara Davidson  . From The New York Times
  4. ^ Wadler, Joyce (2007-03-01). "A new chapter for Sara Davidson, a voice of the boomers". New York Times. Retrieved 1 August 2011. 
  5. ^ Warrick, Pamela (1999-03-22). "Love on the Range". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 1 August 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i Applegate, Edd (1996). Literary journalism: a biographical dictionary of writers and editors. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 58. ISBN 0-313-29949-8. Retrieved 2009-06-09. 
  7. ^ a b c Davidson, Sara. "Biography". Archived from the original on 2009-07-20. Retrieved 2009-06-08. 
  8. ^ Davidson, Sara (2008-09-22). "My Mother's Case of 'Pleasant Dementia'". Newsweek. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  9. ^ Davidson, Sara (2003-03-01). "Murder in Westwood.". O, The Oprah Magazine. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  10. ^ a b c d e "Sara Davidson Books". Archived from the original on 2009-07-20. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  11. ^ "Loose change by Sara Davidson". Google books. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  12. ^ ""Loose Change" (1978)". IMDb. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  13. ^ "Real property by Sara Davidson". Google books. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  14. ^ "Friends of the opposite sex by Sara Davidson". Google books. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  15. ^ "Rock Hudson: his story by Sara Davidson". Google books. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  16. ^ "Cowboy by Sara Davidson". Google books. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  17. ^ "Sara Davidson LEAP!". Archived from the original on 2009-07-20. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  18. ^ "Leap! by Sara Davidson". Google books. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 
  19. ^ Wadler, Joyce (March 1, 2007). "Writing Her Own Sequel". The New York Times. Retrieved June 8, 2009. 
  20. ^ "Jack and Mike". Television. The New York Times. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-08. 
  21. ^ "HeartBeat". Television. The New York Times. 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-08. 
  22. ^ "Sara Davidson Radio and television". Archived from the original on 2009-02-02. Retrieved 2009-06-07. 

External links[edit]