Sarah Gray

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Sarah Gray
Personal information
Born (1990-10-28) 28 October 1990 (age 28)
New Zealand

Sarah Gray (born 28 October 1990) is a New Zealand rower.[1][2]

Under national coach Dick Tonks, Gray was placed in a women's quadruple scull with Fiona Bourke, Eve MacFarlane, and Louise Trappitt. They surprised themselves by winning bronze at the regattas in Hamburg (Germany) and Lucerne (Switzerland).[3][4][5] They maintained their form and won a bronze at the 2011 World Rowing Championships at Lake Bled in Bled, Slovenia.[6]

At the 2012 Summer Olympics, she competed in the women's quadruple sculls.[7]

She is also an equine veterinarian at the University of California's William R. Pritchard Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital in Davis.[8] There, among her patients, she successfully treated a Western Classic Barrel racing champion for extensive lacerations, and aided his return to top form.[9] Her work with horses has been featured in literary works like Equine ER: Stories from a Year in the Life of an Equine Veterinary Hospital by Leslie Guttman.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Medal Count - Olympic Results & Medalists | IOC". London2012.com. Archived from the original on 1 May 2013. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  2. ^ "Sarah Gray". International Rowing Federation. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  3. ^ Leggat, David (28 April 2012). "Rowing: The schoolground tap on the shoulder that led to London". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  4. ^ "(W4x) Women's Quadruple Sculls - Final". International Rowing Federation. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  5. ^ "(W4x) Women's Quadruple Sculls - Final". International Rowing Federation. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  6. ^ "(W4x) Women's Quadruple Sculls - Final". International Rowing Federation. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  7. ^ "Sarah Gray". BBC Sport. Retrieved 8 September 2012.
  8. ^ "Faculty / Staff | UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine - Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital". Vetmed.ucdavis.edu. 24 August 2015. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  9. ^ "Archives | Vet Med News". Vetmed.ucdavis.edu. 22 October 2015. Retrieved 7 November 2015.
  10. ^ "About the book Equine ER". Leslie Guttman. 3 October 2008. Retrieved 7 November 2015.