Sarah J. Maas

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Sarah J. Maas
Born
Sarah Janet Maas[1]

(1986-03-05) March 5, 1986 (age 32)
New York
NationalityAmerican
OccupationAuthor
Notable work
Websitesarahjmaas.com

Sarah Janet Maas (born 5 March 1986) is an American fantasy author.[2] Her debut novel, Throne of Glass, was published in 2012 by Bloomsbury.

Early life[edit]

Maas was born as Sarah J. Maas on March 5, 1986 in New York City, New York.[3]

Education[edit]

In 2008, Maas graduated Magna Cum Laude from Hamilton College in Clinton, Oneida County, New York, where she majored in creative writing and minored in religious studies.

Personal life[edit]

Maas is married and lives in Pennsylvania.[4] She announced on Instagram on November 22, 2017, that she and her husband were expecting their first child, a boy. Her son, Taran, was born in June 2018. Maas is a writer of young adult science fiction and fantasy literature.[5]

Career[edit]

Maas began writing what would become her debut novel, Throne of Glass, when she was sixteen years old.[4][6] After writing several chapters of the novel (then titled Queen of Glass), she posted them on FictionPress.com, where it was one of the most popular stories on the site. It was later removed from the site when she decided to try to publish the novel.[6] The story line of the series is based on Cinderella, with the premise of "What if Cinderella was not a servant, but an assassin? And what if she didn't attend the ball to meet the prince, but to kill him, instead?"[6][7]

In 2008, Maas started sending the story to agents before finding one in 2009.[6] Throne of Glass was purchased in March 2010 by Bloomsbury, who later purchased two additional books in the series.[8] The series is available in 15 countries and 23 languages.[9][4] Several prequel novellas set two years before the first novel have also been published.[10] Maas is set to write seven books in the series.[9] The second book of the series, Crown of Midnight, was named a New York Times young adult best-seller.[3][11] In September 2015 it was announced that the Mark Gordon Company had acquired television rights for Throne of Glass.[12] The final book in the series, Kingdom of Ash, was released on October 23, 2018.[13]

A Court of Thorns and Roses, Maas' second series, is a loose retelling of Beauty and the Beast.[14][15] The first book of the trilogy was written in 2009 but wasn't published until 2015. The series is on its way to becoming a movie.[16]

On May 16, 2018, Maas announced her third series overall and first adult fantasy series, Crescent City, which is set to be published by Bloomsbury in 2019.[17]

Writing[edit]

Throne of Glass series[edit]

Series
  • The Assassin's Blade (prequel novellas)[4]
  1. The Assassin and the Pirate Lord (2012)[18]
  2. The Assassin and the Healer (2013)[3]
  3. The Assassin and the Red Desert (2012)[10]
  4. The Assassin and the Underworld (2012)[3]
  5. The Assassin and the Empire (2012)[3]
Companion
  • Throne of Glass Compendium
  • Throne of Glass Colouring Book

A Court of Thorns and Roses series[edit]

Series
  • A Court of Thorns and Roses (2015)[14]
  • A Court of Mist and Fury (2016)
  • A Court of Wings and Ruin (2017)
  • A Court of Frost and Starlight (novella, 2018)[19]
Companion
  • A Court of Thorns and Roses Coloring Book

Other[edit]

  • Catwoman: Soulstealer (2018)[20]
  • The Starkillers Cycle (online book, co-written by Susan Dennard)
  • Twilight of the Gods (TBA)
  • Crescent City (2019)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Sarah J. Maas on Twitter". Twitter. Retrieved 20 January 2016.
  2. ^ "Sarah J. Maas | New York Times Bestselling Author". sarahjmaas.com. Retrieved 2016-02-15.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Sarah J. Maas". ISFDB. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g "About Sarah". Sarah J. Maas. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  5. ^ "Sarah J.Maas". Goodreads. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  6. ^ a b c d "Interview with Sarah J. Maas". Steph Browe. 11 October 2009. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  7. ^ Chase, Serena (16 August 2012). "Review: Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas". USA Today. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  8. ^ Sarah Maas (16 January 2012). "Big News Reveal". Goodreads. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  9. ^ a b c "FAQ". Sarah J. Maas. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  10. ^ a b c "Interview with Sarah J. Maas". A Backwards Story. 14 January 2012. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  11. ^ "Best Sellers – Young Adult". New York Times. 15 September 2013. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  12. ^ "Sarah J. Maas' 'A Court Of Thorns And Roses' Is Coming to the Big Screen". Bustle. 11 November 2015. Retrieved 12 November 2015.
  13. ^ a b Bloomsbury.com. "Kingdom of Ash". Bloomsbury Publishing. Retrieved 2018-06-04.
  14. ^ a b "Sarah J. Maas's 'A Court of Thorns and Roses' And 7 Other News Series You Need To Start ASAP". Bustle. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  15. ^ "A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas – review". The Guardian. 15 June 2015. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  16. ^ "Interview: Sarah J. Maas". USA Today. 24 October 2014. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  17. ^ "Sarah J. Maas on Instagram: "So ridiculously excited to finally be able to announce this (link in bio for more details)!! I've been working on Crescent City for several…"". Instagram. Retrieved 2018-08-20.
  18. ^ "The Assassin and the Pirate Lord by Sarah J. Maas". Publishing Crawl. 21 January 2012. Retrieved 19 June 2015.
  19. ^ "A Court of Frost and Starlight | Sarah J. Maas". sarahjmaas.com. Retrieved 2018-04-11.
  20. ^ "Wonder Woman, Batman, Superman, and Catwoman get the YA treatment". EW.com. Retrieved 5 December 2018.