Sarah Stewart (basketball)

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Sarah Stewart
150611 - Sarah Stewart - 3b - 2012 Team processing.jpg
2012 Australian Paralympic Team portrait of Stewart
Personal information
Nationality  Australia
Born (1976-06-13) 13 June 1976 (age 38)
Sport
Country Australia
Sport Wheelchair basketball
Disability class 3.0
Event(s) Women's team
Club Sydney University Flames

Sarah Stewart (born 13 June 1976) is a 3.0 point wheelchair basketball player from Australia. She participated in the 2004 Summer Paralympics in Athens, where she won a silver medal; in the 2008 Summer Paralympics in Beijing, where she won a bronze medal; and the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London, where she won a second silver medal.

Stewart has played in the Australian Women's National Wheelchair Basketball League (WNWBL) and the National Wheelchair Basketball League (NWBL) since 2002. She has won numerous awards, including being named to the 2004, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012 WNWBL All-Star Five; the 2009 and 2010 WNWBL Most Valuable Player (MVP) in the 3 point class; and the 2002 WNWBL Best New Talent. She was 2010 WNWBL Champion with the Sydney Uni Flames, and 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 WNWBL Champion with the Hills Hornets. She was the WNWBL's Highest point scorer in 2010. She was also a 2005 and 2004 NWBL Champion with the West Sydney Razorbacks.

Stewart was first selected to play for the Australia women's national wheelchair basketball team, known as the Gliders, in 2003. Since then she has played over 150 international games for Australia, winning gold medals at the Asia-Oceania 2012 and 2008 Paralympic Qualifiers, the Asia-Oceania 2006 World Cup Qualifiers, and the 2009, 2010 and 2012 Osaka Cup. She was named MVP of the 2012 Osaka Cup and was All-Star Five in the Four-Nation International in Sydney in 2007.

Personal[edit]

Stewart was born on 13 June 1976. When she was 17 years old she injured her right ankle when she tripped on the stairs. This developed into reflex sympathetic dystrophy. She then fractured a bone in her left leg, which set off dystrophy in that leg as well. This resulted in her needing a wheelchair for mobility.[1][2] She plays the saxophone in a band.[3][4] She attended University of New South Wales and Sydney University, where she took classes in Cognitive Science, English, and Philosophy.[4] She has BSc (Honours) in Philosophy and Cognitive Science and a BA in English from the University of New South Wales.[3]

Stewart earned the Sydney University Vice Chancellor's Award for Academic and Sporting Achievement in 2004, and the New South Wales Institute of Sport (NSWIS) University of Sydney Academic Excellence award in 2009.[5][6] In 2012 she was a PhD candidate at the University of Sydney. She is a vegan and used Twitter to connect with others about being vegan.[2][7]

Wheelchair basketball[edit]

Stewart warming up before playing wheelchair basketball for the Australian Women's team at the Rollers & Gliders World Challenge in Sydney

Stewart is a 3.0 point player.[4] She took up the sport while attending the University of NSW following a visit by a Wheelchair Sports NSW road show. "From the moment I jumped in the basketball chair and started playing", she later recalled, "it felt like Quidditch on wheels!"[8] From 2003 to 2012, she had a scholarship with the New South Wales Institute of Sport.[9][10]

Club[edit]

Stewart has played in the Women's National Wheelchair Basketball League (WNWBL) in Australia since 2002, with the North Sydney Bears from 2002 to 2004, the Hills Hornets from 2005 to 2010, and the Sydney University Flames since 2011. In the National Wheelchair Basketball League (NWBL), a mixed competition, she played for the West Sydney Razorbacks from 2002 to 2011. Since 2011 she has played for the Sydney University Wheelkings.[5]

Stewart won the 2001 and 2002 Encouragement Award in the Women’s National Club Championships. In 2002, she was also named the Most Valuable Player (MVP) of the Southern Challenge. She has won numerous awards, including named part of the 2004, 2008, 2009, 2010 and 2012 WNWBL All-Star Five; the 2009 and 2010 WNWBL MVP in the 3 point class; and the 2002 WNWBL Best New Talent. She was also the WNWBL's highest point scorer in 2010.[5] She was part of the 2004 and 2005 NWBL Championship side with the West Sydney Razorbacks, the 2005, 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 WNWBL Championshop winning Hills Hornets, and won the 2010 WNWBL Champion with the Sydney Uni Flames.[3][11]

In the second round of the 2008 season, the Western Stars defeated the Hills Hornets 52–44. Playing for the Hornets, Stewart scored 20 points in her team's loss.[12] Also in the second round that year, the team played the Dandenong Rangers, where Stewart scored 24 points in her team's 72–38 victory.[12]

National team[edit]

Stewart was first selected to play for the Australia women's national wheelchair basketball team, known as the Gliders, in 2003.[3] Since then she has played over 150 international games for Australia. Her international career highlights include gold medals at the Asia-Oceania 2008 and 2012 Paralympic Qualifiers, the Asia-Oceania 2006 World Cup Qualifiers, and the 2009, 2010 and 2012 Osaka Cup. She was named MVP of the tournament at the 2012 Osaka Cup, and was All-Star Five for the Four-Nation International in Sydney in 2007.[3][5][10][11] She competed at the 2006 and 2010 World Wheelchair Basketball Championship. The Gliders finished fourth both times.[2] She was selected to participate in a national team training camp in 2010.[13]

Paralympics[edit]

Stewart was part of the silver medal-winning team, at the 2004 Summer Paralympics in Athens,[14][15] and the bronze medal winning team at the 2008 Summer Paralympics in Beijing.[15][16] She played in the team's semi-final loss to the United States and was one of Australia's key defenders in the game.[17]

Stewart was selected to represent Australia at the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London.[18] In the group stage, the Australia women's national wheelchair basketball team at the 2012 Summer Paralympics posted wins against Brazil,[19] Great Britain,[20] and the Netherlands,[21] but lost to the Canada.[22] This was enough to advance the Gliders to the quarter-finals, where they beat Mexico.[23] The Gliders then defeated the United States by a point to set up a final clash with Germany.[24] The Gliders lost 44–58, and earned a silver medal.[25]

Statistics[edit]

Season statistics[5]
Competition Season Matches FGM–FGA FG% 3FGM–3FGA 3FG% FTM–FTA FT% PF Pts TOT AST PTS
WNWBL 2009 16 117–351 33.3 0–13 0.0 17–40 42.5 24 251 12.4 4.4 15.7
WNWBL 2010 14 98–275 35.6 0–7 0.0 14–41 34.1 29 210 12.7 4.1 15.0
WNWBL 2011 18 148–371 39.9 1–9 11.1 26–51 51.0 34 323 11.9 3.7 17.9
WNWBL 2012 18 170–380 34.7 0–16 0.0 23–45 51.1 30 363 12.6 4.1 20.2
WNWBL 2013 16 120–280 42.9 1–10 10.0 28–49 57.1 30 269 10.9 4.1 16.8
Key
FGM, FGA, FG%: field goals made, attempted and percentage 3FGM, 3FGA, 3FG%: three-point field goals made, attempted and percentage
FTM, FTA, FT%: free throws made, attempted and percentage PF: personal fouls
Pts, PTS: points, average per game TOT: turnovers average per game, AST: assists average per game

References[edit]

  1. ^ Swanton, Will (13 July 2008). "Stewart thinking big on her way to the Games". The Age. 
  2. ^ a b c "Wheelchair Basketball". Media Guide, London 2012 Paralympic Games. Homebush Bay, New South Wales: Australian Paralympic Committee. 2012. pp. 92–99 [99]. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "Sarah Stewart". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 18 July 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "Profile". London: London 2012 Olympic and Paralympics. Archived from the original on 26 May 2013. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "Player Statistics for Sarah Stewart (3.0)". Sporting Pulse. Retrieved 14 August 2013. 
  6. ^ "Kylie to play for Australia — General — Sport — Blacktown Advocate". Blacktown-advocate.whereilive.com.au. 13 September 2012. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  7. ^ Budziak, Kimberly (31 August 2012). "Paralympic Basketball Player Follows Vegan Diet". Vegnews.com. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  8. ^ "PhD student and Paralympian". Women in Focus. 
  9. ^ "Wheelchair basketball". NSWIS. Retrieved 16 September 2012. 
  10. ^ a b "Sarah Stewart". NSWIS. Retrieved 16 September 2012. 
  11. ^ a b Nageshwar, Pranesh (1 February 2010). "Back-to-back titles the goal for Hills Hornets". Hills Shire Times. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  12. ^ a b "WNWBL Round 2 – National Wheelchair Basketball League (NWBL)". SportingPulse. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  13. ^ "Local Gliders". Hills Shire Times (Sydney, Australia). 19 January 2010. p. 77. Retrieved 18 September 2012. 
  14. ^ "Results — Athens 2004 Paralympic Games — Wheelchair Basketball — Women". International Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  15. ^ a b "Basketball Chronology". Basketball Australia. 2010. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  16. ^ McGarry, Andrew (4 September 2008). "Event guide: Wheelchair basketball". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  17. ^ Hoyer, Melissa (15 September 2008). "Americans shatter Aussie gold medal dream". The Courier-Mail. Retrieved 17 September 2012. 
  18. ^ Thomas, Stacy (2010-07-20). "Rollers and Gliders announce Paralympic team". Mt Druitt Standard. Retrieved 13 July 2012. 
  19. ^ Abbott, Chris (30 August 2012). "Gliders Prevail in Thriller". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  20. ^ Abbott, Chris (31 August 2012). "Gliders Win Comfortably Against Host". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  21. ^ Abbott, Chris (2 September 2012). "Gliders Secure Quarter Final Place". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  22. ^ "Gliders shocked by Canada". Basketball Australia. 2 September 2012. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 
  23. ^ Abbott, Chris (4 September 2012). "Gliders Dominate Mexico". Australian Paralympic Committee. Retrieved 2 February 2012. 
  24. ^ "Gliders down champions to reach final". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 7 September 2012. Retrieved 30 January 2013. 
  25. ^ Paxinos, Stathi (9 September 2013). "Gliders get rolled for gold by German muscle". The Age. Retrieved 1 February 2013. 

External links[edit]