Sardar Singh of Jodhpur

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Sardar Singh
Maharaja of Jodhpur
Maharaja of Jodhpur
Period1895 - 1911
PredecessorJaswant Singh II
Heir apparentSumer Singh
Born(1880-02-11)11 February 1880
Jodhpur, Jodhpur district, Rajasthan, India
Died21 March 1911(1911-03-21) (aged 31)
IssueSumer Singh
Umaid Singh
HouseRathore-Jodhpur
FatherMaharaja Sir Jaswant Singh II of Jodhpur
ReligionHinduism

Maharaja Sir Sardar Singh Bahadur GCSI (11 February 1880 – 21 March 1911) was the Maharaja of Jodhpur State from 11 October 1895 till his death on 20 March 1911.[1][2]

He succeeded his father Maharaja Sir Jaswant Singh II in 1895. He reigned under the Regency of his uncle until he came of age and was invested with full ruling powers, at Mehrangarh, Jodhpur, 18 February 1898. But within a short period of attaining his ruling powers, he began to spend state funds on an extraordinary rate and neglected his duties in favor of pleasure, thereby depleting the state revenues and gradually causing the administration to grind to a near halt. The British Indian officials, eventually intervened in 1903 and deprived him of his ruling powers and ordered him to refrain from interfering in the active work of his ministers and requested that he reside outside the state at Panchmarhi. He had certain restricted powers restored to him and was permitted to return to Jodhpur 8 November 1905. Further powers were restored to him in 1906, with full ruling powers being finally restored in 1908.[3] He was created KCSI in 1908 and GCSI in 1910.[3] He was a noted polo player.[4]

He died on 21 March 1911 and was succeeded by his son Sumer Singh[3]

Preceded by
Maharaja Jaswant Singh II
Rulers of Marwar (Jodhpur)
The Rathore Dynasty

11 October 1895– 20 March 1911
Succeeded by
Maharaja Sumer Singh

References[edit]

  1. ^ Tanuja Kothiyal (14 March 2016). Nomadic Narratives: A History of Mobility and Identity in the Great Indian Desert. Cambridge University Press. p. 290. ISBN 978-1-107-08031-7. Retrieved 30 October 2016.
  2. ^ George S. Cuhaj (1 July 2015). Standard Catalog of World Coins 2016: 1901-2000. "F+W Media, Inc.". p. 1104. ISBN 978-1-4402-4409-4. Retrieved 30 October 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Jodhpur State
  4. ^ Jaisal Singh (2007). Polo in India. New Holland Publishers. p. 33. ISBN 978-1-84537-913-1. Retrieved 30 October 2016.