Sargé-sur-Braye

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Sargé-sur-Braye
Commune
Church of Saint-Cyr
Church of Saint-Cyr
Coat of arms of Sargé-sur-Braye
Coat of arms
Sargé-sur-Braye is located in France
Sargé-sur-Braye
Sargé-sur-Braye
Location within Centre-Val de Loire region
Sargé-sur-Braye is located in Centre-Val de Loire
Sargé-sur-Braye
Sargé-sur-Braye
Coordinates: 47°55′28″N 0°51′14″E / 47.9244°N 0.8539°E / 47.9244; 0.8539Coordinates: 47°55′28″N 0°51′14″E / 47.9244°N 0.8539°E / 47.9244; 0.8539
Country France
Region Centre-Val de Loire
Department Loir-et-Cher
Arrondissement Vendôme
Canton Le Perche
Intercommunality Collines du Perche
Government
 • Mayor (20014–2020) Jean Léger
Area1 42.61 km2 (16.45 sq mi)
Population (2015)2 1,054
 • Density 25/km2 (64/sq mi)
Time zone CET (UTC+1)
 • Summer (DST) CEST (UTC+2)
INSEE/Postal code 41235 /41170
Elevation 78–202 m (256–663 ft)
(avg. 90 m or 300 ft)

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.

2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Sargé-sur-Braye is a commune in the Loir-et-Cher department in central France.

Geography[edit]

The commune is bathed by the Braye and the Grenne rivers, which join here before leading as the Braye to the Loir. The town is a part of the canton of Le Perche. It is bordered to the north by Cormenon, to the south by Savigny-sur-Braye, to the east by Épuisay and to the west by Saint-Calais.

History[edit]

Between 29 January and 8 February 1939, more than 3,100 Spanish refugees fleeing the collapse of the Spanish Republic under Franco, arrived in Loir-et-Cher. Faced with a lack of buildings to welcome them (the stud farm at Selles-sur-Cher had been used), 47 villages provide accommodation,[1] including Sargé-sur-Braye.[2] The refugees, essentially women and children, were subjected to a strict quarantine and vaccinated. Mail was limited. Supplies, though lacking variety and cooked the French way, were, however, assured.[3] In the spring and summer, the refugees were regrouped at Bois-Brûlé (commune of Boisseau).[4]

Population[edit]

Historical population
YearPop.±%
17931,534—    
18061,691+10.2%
18211,690−0.1%
18311,777+5.1%
18411,734−2.4%
18511,598−7.8%
18611,550−3.0%
18721,508−2.7%
18811,745+15.7%
18911,625−6.9%
19011,702+4.7%
19111,756+3.2%
19211,536−12.5%
19311,393−9.3%
19461,235−11.3%
19541,120−9.3%
19621,144+2.1%
1968991−13.4%
1975911−8.1%
1982974+6.9%
1990988+1.4%
1999974−1.4%
2006934−4.1%
20151,054+12.8%

Sights[edit]

Saint-Martin church
  • Église Saint-Martin. This church been listed since 1958 as a historic monument by the French Ministry of Culture. Dating originally from the 10th century, its present form is from 1549. There are traces of 14th century painted murals.[5]
  • Église Saint-Cyr, and its jacquemart.
  • Château des Radrets has been listed since 1977 as a monument historique. Parts of it date back to the 15th century; it was extensively altered in the 18th.[6]
  • Château de Montmarin has been listed since 1986 as a monument historique. Originally 17th century, it was altered in the 18th and 19th.[7]
  • Château du Fief Corbin
  • Roussard quarry

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeanine Sodigné-Loustau, "L'accueil des réfugiés civils espagnols de 1936 à 1940. Un exemple : la région Centre", Matériaux pour l'histoire de notre temps. 1996, no 44. p. 43.
  2. ^ Jeanine Sodigné-Loustau, op cit, p. 47.
  3. ^ Jeanine Sodigné-Loustau, op cit, p. 43-44.
  4. ^ Jeanine Sodigné-Loustau, op cit, p. 46.
  5. ^ Ministry of Culture: Eglise Saint-Martin (in French)
  6. ^ Ministry of Culture: Château des Radrets (in French)
  7. ^ Ministry of Culture: Château de Montmarin (in French)

External links[edit]