Satisfactory

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Satisfactory
Satifactory video game cover art.jpg
Developer(s)Coffee Stain Studios
Publisher(s)Coffee Stain Publishing
EngineUnreal Engine 4
Platform(s)Microsoft Windows
Release19 March 2019 (Early access)
Genre(s)Simulation
Mode(s)Single-player, multiplayer

Satisfactory is a simulation game created by Coffee Stain Studios. It is a 3D first-person open world exploration and factory building game. As an engineer, the player is dropped onto an alien planet with a handful of tools and must harvest the planet's natural resources to construct increasingly complex factories for automating all resource needs. The initial goal is to build the Space Elevator and begin supplying the company the player works for (Ficsit) with increasingly numerous and complex components for their unknown purposes.

The factory-building aspect of Satisfactory has been described as a first-person version of Factorio.[1] Unlike most other sandbox games like Factorio, the Satisfactory world is pre-generated, i.e. every player's map is identical at the start. The world is 30 km2.

Gameplay[edit]

The player takes the role of an engineer that has crashed landed via an escape pod on a planet; the player has a choice of four starting locations: the Grasslands, the Rocky Desert, the Dune Desert, or the Northern Forest; this affects the availablity of resources that the player can harvest. On landing, the player starts by constructing the Hub from the escape pod's parts, the main location from which most other construction they will build extends from. From there, the player works to expand the Hub from one Tier to the next by providing specific components, most which have to be made by gathering local resources such as ores and plant materials with hand tools, using crafting equipment in the Hub to make new tools or equipment, and using that equipment to make the new components. Once all necessary components are supplied to the Hub, it is expanded to the next Tier, giving the player more construction options and new goals.

Initially, most of this construction will be by hand with the player traversing to resources directly to collect them, then to stations to make the gear. However, as the player unlocks new equipment, many of these processes can be automated by the introduction of power systems, including nuclear power plants, and through automated resource collection automation and transport like conveyor belts. The ultimate goal of the game is to build enough parts to construct a space elevator as to return to space. Along the way, besides building the automation to build these parts, they must also survive the hazards of the planet they are on, including the flora and fauna associated with it. Various weapons and defensive elements can be constructed alongside the other equipment.

Sales[edit]

Within three months of its release on early access, over 500,000 copies had been sold.[2] By July 2020, more than 1.3 million copies have been sold.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Satisfactory looks a lot like first-person Factorio".
  2. ^ Bailey, Dustin (June 7, 2019). "Epic exclusive Satisfactory has sold 500,000 copies in under three months". PCGamesN. Retrieved June 7, 2019.
  3. ^ MacGregor, Jody (July 5, 2020). "Here's how many copies Satisfactory has sold on Steam and Epic". PC Gamer. Retrieved July 5, 2020.

External links[edit]