Satoko Miyahara

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Satoko Miyahara
Miyahara at the 2017 Skate America
Native name宮原 知子
Born (1998-03-26) March 26, 1998 (age 25)
Kyoto, Japan
HometownKyoto, Japan
Height152 cm (5 ft 0 in)
Figure skating career
Country Japan
Skating clubKansai University SC
Kinoshita Group
Began skating2002
RetiredMarch 26, 2022
Medal record
Representing  Japan
Figure skating: Ladies' singles
World Championships
Silver medal – second place 2015 Shanghai Ladies' singles
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Milan Ladies' singles
Four Continents Championships
Gold medal – first place 2016 Taipei Ladies' singles
Silver medal – second place 2015 Seoul Ladies' singles
Silver medal – second place 2014 Taipei Ladies' singles
Bronze medal – third place 2018 Taipei Ladies' singles
Grand Prix Final
Silver medal – second place 2016–17 Marseille Ladies' singles
Silver medal – second place 2015–16 Barcelona Ladies' singles
World Team Trophy
Bronze medal – third place 2015 Tokyo Team

Satoko Miyahara (宮原 知子, Miyahara Satoko, born March 26, 1998) is a retired Japanese figure skater. She is the 2015 World silver medalist, the 2018 World bronze medalist, the 2016 Four Continents champion, a two-time Four Continents silver medalist (2014, 2015), a two-time Grand Prix Final silver medalist (2015, 2016), a two-time Skate America champion (2017, 2018), the 2015 NHK Trophy champion, a four-time CS U.S. Classic champion (2015, 2016, 2018, 2019), the 2014 CS Lombardia Trophy champion, and a four-time Japanese national champion (2014–17).

On the junior level, she is the 2012 JGP U.S. champion, the 2011 JGP Poland silver medalist, the 2012 Asian Figure Skating Trophy champion, and a two-time Japanese junior national champion (2012, 2013).

She placed fourth at the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Personal life[edit]

Miyahara was born on March 26, 1998, in Kyoto, Japan.[12] Her parents are both doctors. Due to her parents' work, she moved with her family to Houston, Texas, when she was five years old and had returned to Kyoto by the age of seven.[13] Miyahara learned English during her time in the United States.[14]

In February 2016, Miyahara graduated from Kansai University High School.[15] She graduated from Kansai University in the spring of 2021, having studied in the Faculty of Literature and majoring in British and American Literature and English.[16][17]

Standing five feet tall, she is known to her fan base as the "Tiny Queen".

Career[edit]

Miyahara began skating while she was living in the United States and came under the guidance of Mie Hamada in Kyoto, Japan at the age of seven.[13]

2011–2012 season: Junior international debut[edit]

Miyahara became eligible for junior international competition in the 2011–2012 season. She won a silver medal at her Junior Grand Prix debut in Gdańsk, Poland, and finished fifth at her second event in Milan, Italy. Miyahara then won the Japan junior title and placed sixth on the senior level. She was fourth at her first World Junior Championships. Miyahara was invited to skate in the gala at the 2012 World Team Trophy as the Japanese junior national champion.

2012–2013 season: First senior national podium[edit]

In the 2012–2013 season, Miyahara won gold and bronze medals at her JGP events in the United States and Turkey, respectively. Miyahara then won the 2012 Japanese Junior Championships, before placing fifth at the JGP Final in Sochi, Russia.

Miyahara won her first senior national medal, a bronze, at the Japanese Championships, finishing ahead of Akiko Suzuki. She ended her season at the 2013 World Junior Championships where she finished seventh.

2013–2014 season: Senior international debut[edit]

Miyahara started the 2013–2014 season by winning the Asian Trophy. Debuting on the senior Grand Prix, she finished fifth at the 2013 NHK Trophy, having placed sixth in the short program and fifth in the free skate. At the 2013 Rostelecom Cup, she was sixth in the short program, sixth in the free skate, and fifth overall.

At the Japanese Championships, Miyahara placed fourth in the short, fifth in the free, and fourth overall, behind Akiko Suzuki, Kanako Murakami, and Mao Asada. She was selected to compete at the 2014 Four Continents Championships, where she won the silver medal behind teammate Kanako Murakami after placing fourth in the short and second in the free.

Miyahara finished fourth at the 2014 World Junior Championships — less than a point out of third. She ended her season with a gold medal at the Gardena Spring Trophy.

2014–2015 season: World silver medalist[edit]

Miyahara attended a training camp during the summer of 2014 to work with Olympic champion Ilia Kulik on her jumps.[citation needed] She opened the 2014–2015 season with a win at the Lombardia Trophy. Competing in the Grand Prix series, she took bronze at the 2014 Skate Canada International after placing fourth in the short program and third in the free skate. She won another bronze medal at 2014 NHK Trophy (fourth in SP, second in FS). With these results, Miyahara was the second alternate for the Grand Prix Final.

At the Japanese Championships, Miyahara placed second in the short and first in the free on her way to her first senior national title. At the 2015 Four Continents Championships, she won silver for the second year in a row, having won the short program and placed second in the free.

Miyahara (left) with Elizaveta Tuktamysheva (center) and Elena Radionova (right) at the 2015 World Championships podium

Miyahara ranked third in the short, fourth in the free skate, and second overall at the 2015 World Championships, with personal bests in all competition segments. She was awarded the silver medal behind Elizaveta Tuktamysheva. At the 2015 World Team Trophy, she placed fifth individually and third as part of team Japan.

2015–2016 season: Four Continents champion and Grand Prix Final silver[edit]

In the summer of 2015, Miyahara traveled to southern California to work with Ilia Kulik for the second year in a row, aiming to add more power to her jumps.[18] She opened her season on the Challenger Series, winning the 2015 U.S. Classic. Turning to the Grand Prix series, she took bronze at the 2015 Skate America before winning gold at the 2015 NHK Trophy, defeating three-time World Champion Mao Asada. These results qualified Miyahara for her first senior Grand Prix Final.

She won the silver medal at the event in Barcelona after placing fourth in the short program and second in the free skate with personal bests in the free skate and combined total.[19]

Miyahara (center) with Mirai Nagasu (left) and Rika Hongo (right) at the 2016 Four Continents Championships podium

After repeating as the Japanese national champion, Miyahara went on to win gold at the 2016 Four Continents, achieving personal bests in every portion of the competition.[20] She finished fifth at the 2016 World Championships in Boston, the only event of the season where she finished off the podium.

2016–2017 season: Second Grand Prix Final silver[edit]

Miyahara opened her season with a gold medal at the 2016 CS U.S. Classic. Turning to the Grand Prix series, she won the bronze medal at the 2016 Skate Canada International, behind Evgenia Medvedeva and Kaetlyn Osmond, and then silver at the 2016 NHK Trophy, behind Anna Pogorilaya.

Miyahara (left) with Evgenia Medvedeva (center) and Anna Pogorilaya (right) at the 2016–17 Grand Prix Final podium

In December, she was awarded the silver medal at the Grand Prix Final in Marseille, being outscored only by Medvedeva. Later that month, she defeated Wakaba Higuchi and Mai Mihara at the Japan Championships to win her third national title.[21]

Due to a stress fracture in her left pelvic girdle, Miyahara withdrew from two February competitions, the 2017 Four Continents Championships and the 2017 Asian Winter Games.[22][23] To focus on recovery she also decided to withdraw from the 2017 World Championships.[24] The hip injury was attributed to low bone density.[25]

2017–2018 season: Olympic season[edit]

Miyahara injured her left foot in July and was diagnosed with inflammation in her right hip in September.[23][25] She resumed jumping in October.[25] At the 2017 NHK Trophy she finished 5th after underrotating jumps in both nights, but rallied three weeks later to win gold at the 2017 Skate America.[26] She was the first alternate for the 2017-2018 Grand Prix Final in Nagoya, but got promoted and competed in the Final after 2016 champion Evgenia Medvedeva withdrew due to injury. At the Grand Prix Final, she finished third in the short program and fourth in the free skate, finishing fifth overall after lower ranked skaters in the short program performed stronger free skates. Miyahara, while competing well, underrotated two of her jumps in the free skate, also contributing to a lower result.

At the 2017 Japan Championships, Miyahara was crowned the national champion for the fourth time after placing second in the short program and first in the free skate.[27] On December 24, 2017, she was selected to represent Japan at the 2018 Four Continents Championships in Taipei, the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, and 2018 World Championships in Milan, Italy.[28]

In Taipei, Miyahara was first after the short program, third after the free and won the bronze medal overall, behind teammates Kaori Sakamoto and Mai Mihara, contributing to a Japanese sweep of the podium.[29]

Miyahara (right) with Wakaba Higuchi (left) and Kaetlyn Osmond (center) at the 2018 World Championships podium

At the Olympics, Miyahara was assigned to participate in the ladies' short program in the Team Event, with her teammate Kaori Sakamoto chosen to compete in the free skating. She scored 68.95 points, which was the fourth result that night. Team Japan finished fifth overall.[30] In the individual event, Miyahara scored new personal bests with clean performances, placing fourth in both segments of the competition and overall.[31][32]

At the World Championships, Miyahara was in third after the short program, with a score of 74.36 after underrotating a triple toe loop in her jump combination.[33] In the free skating, she placed third again with a score of 135.72 after making several mistakes on her jumps. She took bronze overall, behind Kaetlyn Osmond (gold) and teammate Wakaba Higuchi (silver).[34]

2018–2019 season[edit]

In preparation for the season, Miyahara worked with a new strength trainer and focused especially on strengthening her hamstrings. Competing first at the 2018 U.S. Classic, she won gold. She went on to win the 2018 Skate America event, placing first in both segments.[35] At her second Grand Prix event, the 2018 NHK Trophy, Miyahara placed second in both programs, narrowly winning the silver medal ahead of Elizaveta Tuktamysheva and behind compatriot Rika Kihira. In the short program, she set a new personal best. She received two underrotation calls in the free skate, and remarked "I was very nervous in my long program. I am disappointed, but I know that I will try harder, so I do better in the future."[36] Her results qualified her for the 2018–19 Grand Prix Final, where she finished sixth, following a combination error in the short program and several underrotated jumps in the free skate. Miyahara deemed it a "frustrating competition", but "I think it will be helpful for the future."[37]

At the 2018 Japan Championships, Miyahara won the short program, slightly more than a point ahead of Sakamoto. Several errors lead to her placing fourth in the free skate, dropping to the bronze medal position overall behind Sakamoto and Kihira. She was named to the Japanese team for the 2019 World Championships in Saitama.[38] Miyahara placed eighth in the short program at the World Championships, after underrotating the second part of her jump combination.[39] She rose to sixth place in the free skate after making only one minor error. Miyahara deemed the season as a whole "mentally one of the toughest seasons", and felt she "had more disappointing competitions over good ones", but that the final event was a strong one.[40]

2019–2020 season[edit]

On September 18, 2019, Miyahara's representatives announced that she had moved her primary training base to the Granite Club in Toronto, and was adding Lee Barkell as a coach, though she would continue to be coached by Mie Hamada as well. Miyahara stated that her main goal was to perform a triple Axel in competition.[41] She would later say "to grow up, I chose to go to Toronto."[42]

She began her season at 2019 Japan Open, where she placed fourth with a score of 134.94 points, contributing to Team Japan's silver medal. At 2019 U.S. Classic, she placed first in the short program with 74.16 points and second in the free skate with 130.14 points, once again winning the gold medal at the event.[42]

At her first Grand Prix event, the 2019 Cup of China, she placed second in the short program despite two underrotations.[43] She was third in the free skate, with three jump underrotations, but remained in second place overall, taking the silver medal.[44] Competing the following week at the 2019 Rostelecom Cup, Miyahara placed sixth in the short program after doubling a planned triple Lutz and managing only a triple-double jump combination.[45] She moved from sixth to fourth place in the free skate despite five of her jumps being called underrotated.[46]

Miyahara placed second in the short program at the 2019–20 Japanese Championships after underrotating the second part of her jump combination.[47] She was sixth in the free skate after falling once and underrotating or downgrading eight jumps, and dropped to fourth place overall, her first time finishing off the podium at her national championships since 2013.[48] Disappointed, she commented "I was really good at practice, but I could not control myself tonight, especially in the second half."[49] Despite her nationals finish, Miyahara was assigned to compete at the World Championships in Montreal rather than national bronze medalist Tomoe Kawabata, but the World Championships were cancelled as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.[50]

2020–2021 season[edit]

Miyahara was given a bye to the Japan Championships due to the COVID-19 pandemic making it impractical for her to travel back from her training location in Canada for lesser domestic events.[51] In October, Mie Hamada was removed as one of her coaches on her ISU bio, which listed Lee Barkell as her sole coach.[52] Miyahara was assigned to compete at the 2020 Skate Canada International, but this event was also cancelled as a result of the pandemic.[53]

In December, Miyahara returned to Japan to compete at the 2020–21 Japan Championships.[54] She placed sixth in the short program after performing only an invalid double loop as her solo jump instead of a planned triple.[55] Third in the free skate, she rose to the bronze medal position. She was assigned to compete at the 2021 World Championships in Stockholm.[56] Miyahara suffered a right foot injury later in December that kept her off the ice for some time. She struggled at the World Championships, placing nineteenth, the first time she had placed outside the top six. In her assessment, "in terms of technique, it wasn't a performance worth talking about."[57]

2021–2022 season: Retirement[edit]

Miyahara withdrew from the 2021 CS Autumn Classic International, and thus did not participate in a Challenger event prior to the beginning of the Grand Prix. Competing at the 2021 Skate America, Miyahara placed seventh.[58] Her second Grand Prix was initially the 2021 Cup of China, but following its cancellation she was reassigned to the 2021 Gran Premio d'Italia in Turin.[59] She placed fifth at the event, despite a number of underrotations, and said afterward "there were some issues with some things, but at least I landed all jumps today. I think it's a pretty big step from the last two seasons and I think I was in control of myself better."[60]

At the 2021–22 Japan Championships, Miyahara placed fourth in the short program. She was sixth in the free skate after underrotating several jumps, and finished fifth overall. She was named as an alternate for the Japanese Olympic team, and assigned to compete at the 2022 Four Continents Championships.[61] Miyahara subsequently withdrew from Four Continents due to illness, and was replaced by Yuhana Yokoi.[62]

On March 26, Miyahara announced that she was retiring from competitive skating, saying that she had "no regrets. And, I have a lot of dreams for my next step."[63]

Programs[edit]

Olympic Games

Post-Competitive Career Programs

Season Exhibition
2022-2023
2021-2022

Competitive Career Programs

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2021–2022
[75]
2020–2021
[76]
  • Yalla
    by ZwiReK
  • Tabla & Percussion Solo
    performed by Bashir Abdel Aal
  • Egyptian Disco (Buddha Bar edit)
    by David Visan
    choreo. by Benoit Richaud
2019–2020
[77]
  • Yalla
    by ZwiReK
  • Tabla & Percussion Solo
    performed by Bashir Abdel Aal
  • Egyptian Disco (Buddha Bar edit)
    by David Visan
    choreo. by Benoit Richaud
2018–2019
[78]
2017–2018
[79][80]

2016–2017
[83]

2015–2016
[12][86][87]

2014–2015
[89]

2013–2014
[91]
2012–2013
[92][93]


  • Voice of Spring Waltz
    by Johann Strauss II
2011–2012
[94]

Competitive highlights[edit]

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

International[95]
Event 07–08 08–09 09–10 10–11 11–12 12–13 13–14 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19 19–20 20–21 21–22 23–24
Olympics 4th
Worlds 2nd 5th WD 3rd 6th C 19th
Four Continents 2nd 2nd 1st WD 3rd WD
GP Final 2nd 2nd 5th 6th
GP Cup of China 2nd C
GP Italy 5th
GP NHK Trophy 5th 3rd 1st 2nd 5th 2nd
GP Rostelecom 5th 4th
GP Skate America 3rd 1st 1st 7th
GP Skate Canada 3rd 3rd C
CS Autumn Classic WD
CS Lombardia 1st
CS U.S. Classic 1st 1st 1st 1st
Asian Games WD
Asian Open 1st
Bavarian Open 1st 1st
Gardena Trophy 1st
International: Junior[95]
Junior Worlds 4th 7th 4th
JGP Final 5th
JGP Italy 5th
JGP Poland 2nd
JGP Turkey 3rd
JGP U.S. 1st
Asian Open 1st
International: Novice[95][96][97]
Asian Open 1st
Triglav Trophy 2nd 2nd
Challenge Cup 2nd D
National[98]
Japan 6th 3rd 4th 1st 1st 1st 1st 3rd 4th 3rd 5th
Japan Junior 4th 4th 1st 1st
Japan Novice 1st B 1st B 4th A 2nd A
Western Sect. 1st J 1st J
Kinki Reg. 1st J 1st
Tokyo Reg. 1st
Team events
Olympics 5th T
4th P
World Team Trophy 3rd T
5th P
Team Challenge Cup 3rd T
2nd P
Japan Open 3rd T
2nd P
1st T
2nd P
1st T
2nd P
1st T
3rd P
2nd T
4th P
1st T
6th P
1st T
4th P
TBD = Assigned; WD = Withdrew; C = Event cancelled
Levels: A = Novice A; B = Novice B; D = Debs; J = Junior
T = Team result; P = Personal result. Medals awarded for team result only.

Detailed results[edit]

Senior level[edit]

Miyahara at the 2018 Winter Olympics
Miyahara at the 2015–16 Grand Prix Final podium
Miyahara at the 2015–16 Grand Prix Final
Miyahara at the 2015 World Championships podium

Small medals for short program and free skating awarded only at ISU Championships. At team events, medals awarded for team results only. ISU personal best highlighted in bold.

2023–24 season
Date Event SP FS Total
October 7, 2023 2023 Japan Open 4
123.22
1T
2021–22 season
Date Event SP FS Total
December 22–26, 2021 2021–22 Japan Championships 4
73.76
6
132.75
5
206.51
November 5–7, 2021 2021 Gran Premio d'Italia 4
70.85
5
138.72
5
209.57
October 22–24, 2021 2021 Skate America 8
66.36
6
134.15
7
200.51
October 3, 2021 2021 Japan Open 6
119.69
1T
2020–21 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 22–28, 2021 2021 World Championships 16
59.99
19
112.31
19
172.30
December 24–27, 2020 2020–21 Japan Championships 6
66.48
3
143.27
3
209.75
2019–20 season
Date Event SP FS Total
February 3–9, 2020 2020 Bavarian Open 1
66.11
1
125.91
1
192.61
December 18–22, 2019 2019–20 Japan Championships 2
70.11
6
121.32
4
191.43
15–17 November 2019 2019 Rostelecom Cup 6
63.09
4
129.33
4
192.42
8–10 November 2019 2019 Cup of China 2
68.91
3
142.27
2
211.18
5 October 2019 2019 Japan Open 4
134.94
2T
September 17–22, 2019 2019 CS U.S. Classic 1
74.16
2
130.14
1
204.30
2018–19 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 18–24, 2019 2019 World Championships 8
70.60
6
145.35
6
215.95
February 5–10, 2019 2019 Bavarian Open 2
67.79
1
136.77
1
204.56
December 20–24, 2018 2018–19 Japan Championships 1
76.76
4
146.58
3
223.34
December 6–9, 2018 2018–19 Grand Prix Final 6
67.52
6
133.79
6
201.31
November 9–11, 2018 2018 NHK Trophy 2
76.08
2
143.39
2
219.47
October 19–21, 2018 2018 Skate America 1
73.86
1
145.85
1
219.71
September 12–16, 2018 2018 CS U.S. Classic 1
67.53
1
133.70
1
201.23
2017–18 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 19–25, 2018 2018 World Championships 3
74.36
3
135.72
3
210.08
February 15–23, 2018 2018 Winter Olympics 4
75.94
4
146.44
4
222.38
February 9–12, 2018 2018 Winter Olympics (team event) 4
68.95
5T
January 22–28, 2018 2018 Four Continents Championships 1
71.74
3
135.28
3
207.02
December 21–24, 2017 2017–18 Japan Championships 2
73.23
1
147.16
1
220.39
December 7–10, 2017 2017–18 Grand Prix Final 3
74.61
4
138.88
5
213.49
November 24–26, 2017 2017 Skate America 1
70.72
1
143.31
1
214.03
November 10–12, 2017 2017 NHK Trophy 6
65.05
6
126.75
5
191.80
2016–17 season
Date Event SP FS Total
December 22–25, 2016 2016–17 Japan Championships 1
76.49
1
138.38
1
214.87
December 8–11, 2016 2016–17 Grand Prix Final 3
74.64
2
143.69
2
218.33
November 25–27, 2016 2016 NHK Trophy 3
64.20
2
133.80
2
198.00
October 28–30, 2016 2016 Skate Canada International 5
65.24
3
126.84
3
192.08
October 1, 2016 2016 Japan Open 2
143.39
1T
September 14–18, 2016 2016 CS U.S. Classic 1
70.09
1
136.66
1
206.75
2015–16 season
Date Event SP FS Total
April 22–24, 2016 2016 Team Challenge Cup 3P/1T
73.28
2
145.02
2P/3T
March 28 – April 3, 2016 2016 World Championships 6
70.72
3
139.89
5
210.61
February 16–21, 2016 2016 Four Continents Championships 1
72.48
1
142.43
1
214.91
December 24–27, 2015 2015–16 Japan Championships 1
73.24
1
139.59
1
212.83
December 10–13, 2015 2015–16 Grand Prix Final 4
68.76
2
140.09
2
208.85
November 27–29, 2015 2015 NHK Trophy 1
69.53
1
133.58
1
203.11
October 23–25, 2015 2015 Skate America 3
65.12
3
122.95
3
188.07
October 3, 2015 2015 Japan Open 2
134.67
1T
September 16–20, 2015 2015 CS U.S. Classic 1
63.48
1
120.16
1
183.64
2014–15 season
Date Event SP FS Total
April 16–19, 2015 2015 World Team Trophy 6
60.52
3
129.12
3T/5P
189.64
March 23–29, 2015 2015 World Championships 3
67.02
4
126.58
2
193.60
February 15–19, 2015 2015 Four Continents Championships 1
64.84
2
116.75
2
181.59
December 26–28, 2014 2014–15 Japan Championships 2
64.48
1
131.12
1
195.60
November 28–30, 2014 2014 NHK Trophy 4
60.69
2
118.33
3
179.02
October 31 – November 2, 2014 2014 Skate Canada International 4
60.22
3
121.53
3
181.75
October 4, 2014 2014 Japan Open 2
131.94
3T
September 18–21, 2014 2014 CS Lombardia Trophy 1
58.12
1
125.78
1
183.90
2013–14 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 29–30, 2014 2014 Gardena Spring Trophy 1
62.18
2
105.04
1
167.22
January 20–26, 2014 2014 Four Continents Championships 4
60.27
2
126.26
2
186.53
December 20–23, 2013 2013–14 Japan Championships 4
66.52
5
125.06
4
191.58
November 22–24, 2013 2013 Rostelecom Cup 6
56.57
6
109.19
5
165.76
November 8–10, 2013 2013 NHK Trophy 6
58.39
5
111.82
5
170.21
August 8–11, 2013 2013 Asian Trophy 1
54.43
1
115.42
1
169.85

Junior level[edit]

Miyahara at the 2012-13 Junior Grand Prix Final
Miyahara at the 2012 World Junior Championships
2013–14 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
March 10–16, 2014 2014 World Junior Championships Junior 4
63.57
4
114.12
4
177.69
2012–13 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
February 25 – March 3, 2013 2013 World Junior Championships Junior 6
52.16
8
95.26
7
147.42
December 20–24, 2012 2012–13 Japan Championships Senior 3
60.19
3
120.36
3
180.55
December 6–9, 2012 2012–13 JGP Final Junior 5
49.60
5
108.14
5
157.74
November 17–18, 2012 2012–13 Japan Junior Championships Junior 1
61.31
1
111.37
1
172.68
September 22–24, 2012 2012 JGP Turkey Junior 6
46.62
2
96.74
3
143.36
August 30 – September 1, 2012 2012 JGP United States Junior 1
54.76
1
106.89
1
161.65
August 8–12, 2012 2012 Asian Trophy Junior 2
49.29
1
98.92
1
148.21
2011–12 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
February 27 – March 4, 2012 2012 World Junior Championships Junior 4
52.97
6
104.81
4
157.78
December 22–25, 2011 2011–12 Japan Championships Senior 15
47.06
3
116.79
6
163.85
November 25–27, 2011 2011–12 Japan Junior Championships Junior 1
56.76
1
115.41
1
172.17
October 25–27, 2011 2011 JGP Italy Junior 7
44.91
3
98.33
5
143.24
September 15–17, 2011 2011 JGP Poland Junior 2
56.46
2
105.74
2
162.20
2010–11 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
April 4–10, 2011 2011 Triglav Trophy Novice 2
35.32
1
73.07
2
108.39
November 26–28, 2010 2010–11 Japan Junior Championships Junior 10
43.74
4
96.49
4
140.23
August 27–29, 2010 2010 Asian Trophy Novice 1
43.69
1
92.19
1
135.88
2009–10 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
March 31 – April 4, 2010 2010 Triglav Trophy Novice 4
38.30
2
90.85
2
129.15
November 21–23, 2009 2009–10 Japan Junior Championships Junior 4
48.32
6
82.67
4
130.99

References[edit]

  1. ^ "ISU World Standings 2019/2020. Ladies". isu.org. Retrieved February 19, 2020.
  2. ^ "ISU World Standings for Single & Pair Skating and Ice Dance - Ladies". International Skating Union.
  3. ^ "ISU Judging System - Season Bests Total Scores 2019/2020". International Skating Union.
  4. ^ "ISU Judging System - Season Bests Total Scores 2018/2019". International Skating Union.
  5. ^ "ISU Judging System - Season Bests Total Scores 2017/2018". International Skating Union.
  6. ^ "ISU Judging System - Season Bests Total Scores 2016/2017". International Skating Union.
  7. ^ "ISU Judging System - Season Bests Total Scores 2015/2016". International Skating Union.
  8. ^ "ISU Judging System - Season Bests Total Scores 2014/2015". International Skating Union.
  9. ^ "ISU Judging System - Season Bests Total Scores 2013/2014". International Skating Union.
  10. ^ "ISU Judging System - Season Bests Total Scores 2012/2013". International Skating Union.
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External links[edit]