Satomi's pygmy seahorse

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Satomi's pygmy seahorse
Hippocampus satomiae type specimen.jpg
The holotype of Hippocampus satomiae
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Syngnathiformes
Family: Syngnathidae
Genus: Hippocampus
Species:
H. satomiae
Binomial name
Hippocampus satomiae
Synonyms
  • Hippocampus waleananus M. F. Gomon & R. H. Kuiter, 2009

Satomi's pygmy seahorse (Hippocampus satomiae) is the smallest known seahorse in the world with an average length of 13.8 millimetres (0.54 in) and an approximate height of 11.5 millimetres (0.45 in).[3]

This member of the family Syngnathidae is found at the Derawan Islands off Kalimantan.[4][5] This species name, H. satomiae, is in honour of Satomi Onishi, the dive guide who collected the type specimens.[6]

Hippocampus satomiae was selected as one of "The Top 10 New Species" described in 2009 by The International Institute for Species Exploration at Arizona State University and an international committee of taxonomists.[7] The specific name honours Miss Satomi Onishi, a dive guide, who collected the type specimens.[5]

Hippocampus satomiae attached to a coral

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pollom, R. (2017). "Hippocampus satomiae". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2017: e.T172284A54909678. Retrieved 21 May 2018.
  2. ^ "WoRMS taxon details - Hippocampus satomiae (Lourie & Kuiter, 2008)". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 14 January 2016.
  3. ^ Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2009). "Hippocampus satomiae" in FishBase. May 2009 version.
  4. ^ http://species.asu.edu/2009_species03
  5. ^ a b Lourie, Sara A.; and Rudie H. Kuiter (2008). "Three new pygmy seahorse species from Indonesia (Teleostei: Syngnathidae: Hippocampus)" (PDF). Zootaxa. 1963: 54–68.
  6. ^ Connor, Steve (2009-05-23). "A seahorse the size of a pea". The Independent. London: Independent News and Media. Retrieved 2009-05-27.
  7. ^ Hughes, Carol (2009-05-22). "Scientists announce top 10 new species". ASU News. Arizona State University. Archived from the original on 2009-05-28. Retrieved 2009-05-27.