Saturday Night Live (season 19)

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Saturday Night Live (season 19)
The title card for the nineteenth season of Saturday Night Live.
Country of origin United States
No. of episodes 20
Release
Original network NBC
Original release September 25, 1993 (1993-09-25) – May 14, 1994 (1994-05-14)
Season chronology
← Previous
Season 18
Next →
Season 20
List of Saturday Night Live episodes

The nineteenth season of Saturday Night Live, an American sketch comedy series, originally aired in the United States on NBC between September 25, 1993, and May 14, 1994.

Many changes happened before the start of the season. Dana Carvey had left the show in the middle of the previous season. Chris Rock and Robert Smigel also left the show at the end of the previous season.

Ellen Cleghorne, Melanie Hutsell, Tim Meadows, Adam Sandler, and David Spade were all promoted to repertory status.

Stand-up comics Norm Macdonald, Jay Mohr and Sarah Silverman were hired as writers and would debut as featured players a few episodes into the season. Veteran comic actor Michael McKean joined the show mid-season as a repertory cast member.

This would also be the final season for Phil Hartman, Melanie Hutsell, Rob Schneider, Sarah Silverman and Julia Sweeney.

A major blow for the show was the loss of Hartman. Before his final show the entire cast and crew presented him with a bronzed stick of glue, symbolizing how he had become "The Glue" of the show, a term coined by Adam Sandler.[1]

Cast[edit]

bold denotes Weekend Update anchor

Writers[edit]

Episodes[edit]

No.
overall
No. in
season
Host(s) Musical guest Original air date
347 1 Charles Barkley Nirvana September 25, 1993
348 2 Shannen Doherty Cypress Hill October 2, 1993
349 3 Jeff Goldblum Aerosmith October 9, 1993
  • Aerosmith performs "Cryin'" and "Sweet Emotion."[2]
  • Jay Mohr and Sarah Silverman's first episode as cast members. The first occurrence of "Christopher Walken's Celebrity Psychic Friends Hotline," in which Walken (Mohr) and various oddball and unlikeable celebrities repeatedly offer to visit the house of anyone who calls in.
  • Goldblum's Jurassic Park co-star Laura Dern appears during the monologue.
350 4 John Malkovich Billy Joel October 23, 1993
351 5 Christian Slater The Smashing Pumpkins October 30, 1993
352 6 Rosie O'Donnell James Taylor November 13, 1993
  • James Taylor performs "Memphis" & "Slap Leather" and "Secret O' Life."[2]
  • Guest appearance by Casey Kasem.
353 7 Nicole Kidman Stone Temple Pilots November 20, 1993
354 8 Charlton Heston Paul Westerberg December 4, 1993
  • Paul Westerberg performs "Knockin' On Mine" and "Can't Hardly Wait."[2]
  • The opening montage has the cast members made over to look like apes to coincide with a running gag from the cold opening parodying Planet of the Apes.
355 9 Sally Field Tony! Toni! Toné! December 11, 1993
356 10 Jason Patric Blind Melon January 8, 1994
357 11 Sara Gilbert Counting Crows January 15, 1994
358 12 Patrick Stewart Salt-N-Pepa February 5, 1994
359 13 Alec Baldwin and Kim Basinger UB40 February 12, 1994
  • This episode features the infamous sketch where Adam Sandler's Canteen Boy is molested by his scoutmaster (played by Alec Baldwin).
  • UB40 performs "C'est La Vie" and "Can't Help Falling in Love."[2]
  • Guest appearances by Baldwin's brothers Stephen and Billy.
360 14 Martin Lawrence Crash Test Dummies February 19, 1994
  • Crash Test Dummies performs "Mmm Mmm Mmm Mmm" and "Afternoons & Coffeespoons."[2]
  • Lawrence's opening monologue included explicit material on "feminine hygiene" and has been partially censored in all reruns (including the Netflix collection of SNL episodes from the 1990s) with an explanatory voice-over, stating that Lawrence's views and opinions are not shared by anyone at NBC, the monologue nearly got everyone on the show fired for not stopping it, and that Martin Lawrence has been banned from ever appearing on the show. NBC received 627 complaints about the monologue, while only 3 calls were in support of Lawrence.[3]
361 15 Nancy Kerrigan Aretha Franklin March 12, 1994
362 16 Helen Hunt Snoop Doggy Dogg March 19, 1994
363 17 Kelsey Grammer Dwight Yoakam April 9, 1994
364 18 Emilio Estevez Pearl Jam April 16, 1994
365 19 John Goodman The Pretenders May 7, 1994
366 20 Heather Locklear Janet Jackson May 14, 1994
  • Phil Hartman, Melanie Hutsell, Rob Schneider, Sarah Silverman, and Julia Sweeney's final episode as cast members. A musical tribute is given to Hartman, which ends with him holding a sleeping Chris Farley (dressed as Matt Foley).
  • Kevin Nealon's final episode as Weekend Update anchor.
  • Janet Jackson performs "Throb" and "Any Time, Any Place."[2]
  • Guest appearance by Jay Leno.

Wayne's World 2 film[edit]

Wayne's World 2, the sequel to the 1992 hit Wayne's World, was released on December 10, 1993. Based on the popular "Wayne's World" sketches, the film stars cast members Dana Carvey, Chris Farley and Mike Myers. SNL writers Bob Odenkirk and Robert Smigel have brief cameos as concert nerds. The film did not do as well at the box office as its predecessor but it still did well commercially.[citation needed] The film received generally positive reviews from critics, with Roger Ebert calling the characters of Wayne and Garth "impossible to dislike".[4]

It's Pat film[edit]

It's Pat, a film based on the popular Pat sketches, was released on August 26, 1994. Cast members Tim Meadows, Charles Rocket and Julia Sweeney appear in the film. The film was a box office bomb, barely making $50,000. The film was also panned by critics and has a rare 0% rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 11 reviews.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Saturday Night Live > Season 19 > Episode 20: Heather Locklear/Janet Jackson". TV.com. May 14, 1994. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Saturday Night Live: The First Twenty Years. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 1994. pp. 124–127. ISBN 0-395-70895-8. 
  3. ^ Saturday Night Live: The First Twenty Years. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 1994. p. 264. ISBN 0-395-70895-8. 
  4. ^ Ebert, Roger (December 10, 1993). "Wayne's World 2". Retrieved March 7, 2015. 
  5. ^ It's Pat at Rotten Tomatoes