Saul Dubow

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Saul Dubow

Born (1959-10-28) 28 October 1959 (age 59)
NationalitySouth African
Academic background
Alma mater
ThesisSegregation and native administration in South Africa, 1920-1936 (1986)
Academic work
DisciplineHistory
Institutions

Saul H. Dubow, FRHistS (born 28 October 1959) is a South African historian and academic, specialising in the history of South Africa in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Since 2016, he has been the Smuts Professor of Commonwealth History at the University of Cambridge and a Professorial Fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge. He previously taught at University of Sussex and Queen Mary, University of London.

Early life and education[edit]

Dubow was born on 28 October 1959 in Cape Town, South Africa.[1] He studied at the University of Cape Town, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in 1981.[1][2] He then moved to England to undertake postgraduate studies at the University of Oxford.[3] As a member of St Antony's College, Oxford, he completed his Doctor of Philosophy (DPhil) degree in 1986.[1] His doctoral thesis was titled "Segregation and 'native administration' in South Africa, 1920-1936",[4] which formed the basis for his first book, Racial Segregation and the Origins of Apartheid (1989).

Academic career[edit]

From 1987 to 1989, Dubow was a British Academy post-doctoral fellow at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, University of London.[2][1] He then moved to the University of Sussex as a lecturer in 1989.[1] Having been promoted to senior lecturer and reader over the intervening years, he was appointed Professor of History in 2001.[1][5] He was awarded an Arts and Humanities Research Council fellowship for 2012.[6] In 2013, he moved to Queen Mary, University of London where he had been appointed Professor of African History.[2][3]

In October 2016, it was announced that he had been elected as the next Smuts Professor of Commonwealth History at the University of Cambridge in succession to Megan Vaughan.[2] He took up the chair in 2017 and was additionally elected a Professorial Fellow of Magdalene College, Cambridge.[1][7] Based in the Faculty of History, he teaches courses on the history of modern South Africa, and has wide ranging research interests from racial segregation and Apartheid to intellectual history and the history of science.[8] He delivered his inaugural lecture in November 2018.[9]

Honours[edit]

Dubow is an elected Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (FRHistS).[10] He is an honorary professor of the Centre for African Studies at the University of Cape Town.[11]

Selected works[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Dubow, Prof. Saul". Who's Who 2018. Oxford University Press. 1 December 2017. doi:10.1093/ww/9780199540884.013.U288111. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d "Saul Dubow elected Smuts Professor of Commonwealth History". Faculty of History. University of Cambridge. 19 October 2016. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  3. ^ a b "Professor Saul Dubow". School of History. Queen Mary, University of London. Archived from the original on 30 November 2016. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  4. ^ Dubow, S. (1986). "Segregation and 'native administration' in South Africa, 1920-1936". E-Thesis Online Service. The British Library Board. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  5. ^ "Professor Saul Dubow". Events at The University of Melbourne. University of Melbourne. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  6. ^ "Saul Dubow". University of Sussex. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  7. ^ "Professor Saul Dubow". Magdalene College. University of Cambridge. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  8. ^ "Professor Saul Dubow". Faculty of History. University of Cambridge. Retrieved 6 October 2017.
  9. ^ "Frontiers of Scientific Knowledge in South Africa: Global Science, National Horizon". Magdalene College. University of Cambridge. 28 November 2018. Retrieved 3 February 2019.
  10. ^ "Fellows - D" (pdf). Royal Historical Society. August 2018. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  11. ^ "Honorary Professors". Centre for African Studies. University of Cape Town. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
Academic offices
Preceded by
Megan Vaughan
Smuts Professor of Commonwealth History
2017 to present
Incumbent