Saul Rae

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Saul Forbes Rae
Born (1914-12-31)December 31, 1914
Hamilton, Ontario
Died January 9, 1999(1999-01-09) (aged 84)
Ottawa, Ontario
Occupation diplomat

Saul Forbes Rae (December 31, 1914 – January 9, 1999) was a Canadian diplomat during the Pearsonian era of Canadian foreign policy.

Life and career[edit]

Rae's father was born Goodman Cohen [1] in Palanga, Lithuania. The Cohen family had moved to Scotland fleeing the pogroms of the 1890s, and there Goodman met Helen Rae,[2] the daughter of a metal plater [3] in the Glasgow shipyards. The romance and subsequent marriage caused considerable turmoil in both families, and as a result they moved to Winnipeg, Manitoba in 1912. Saul was born in Hamilton, Ontario on December 31. He had two siblings, an older sister, Grace, who went to work as a dancer at the Radio City Music Hall, and a younger brother Jackie who had a long career in Canadian show business. The three worked in vaudeville in Canada in the 1920s under the name "the three little Raes of Sunshine". He converted to Anglicanism.[4]

Saul Rae graduated from Jarvis Collegiate, University College at the University of Toronto, and went on to earn a doctorate from the London School of Economics as a Massey Fellow. He also studied at Balliol College, Oxford, and went on to lecture at Princeton University where he also worked at the American Institute of Public Opinion. He was a pioneering public opinion researcher co-authoring with George Gallup the 1940 book The Pulse of Democracy: Public Opinion and How It Works.

He married Lois Esther George in 1939.[5] She was the daughter of Stanley George, a Hampstead general practitioner, and Mildred, whose family was from Watford, England. She had studied at Newnham College, Cambridge. The two met at a summer school organized by Sir Norman Angell in Geneva, Switzerland, and were married in Baltimore, Maryland at the outbreak of the second World War.

Saul Rae joined the Department of External Affairs in 1940, and would spend four decades with the civil service as a career diplomat. Rae was one of the first diplomats to serve in Paris after its liberation in 1944, having served as assistant to General Georges Vanier, Canada's representative to the Free French in Algiers.

In 1955, he worked on the International Commission for Supervision and Control in Vietnam as deputy to the Canadian Commissioner, Sherwood Lett. The role of the commission was to supervise the peace settlement at the end of the First Indochina War. He later served as Canadian Minister in the United States (Washington DC 1956-1961), and was Canada's Ambassador to the UN in both Geneva and New York (1972-1976), Mexico (1967-1972) and the Netherlands (1976-1979). He retired in 1980 after suffering a series of small strokes.

Family[edit]

Saul and Lois Rae had four children:

Saul's brother, the late Jackie Rae was an entertainer and former host of the The Jackie Rae Show on CBC...

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reference: Library and Archives Canada, Soldiers of the First World War, RG 150, Accession 1992-93/166, Box 1841 - 54 Item Number: 108356
  2. ^ Ancestry.com. 1901 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1901 Scotland Census. Reels 1-446. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Parish: Govan; ED: 37; Page: 14; Line: 20; Roll: CSSCT1901_328
  3. ^ Ancestry.com. 1901 Scotland Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 2007. Original data: Scotland. 1901 Scotland Census. Reels 1-446. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. Parish: Govan; ED: 37; Page: 14; Line: 17; Roll: CSSCT1901_328
  4. ^ Peter C. Newman (January 2012). "Pretender to the Liberal throne". Maclean's. Retrieved 4 May 2014. 
  5. ^ FERRIER MACKAY, SUSAN. "Lois Rae Was the Wife of a Diplomat, Mother of a Premier." The Globe and Mail 28 Dec. 2014. Print./
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Yvon Beaulne
Canadian Ambassador to the United Nations
July 1972 – July 1976
Succeeded by
William Hickson Barton
Preceded by
Herbert Frederick Brooks-Hill Feaver
Canadian Ambassador to Mexico
1967-1972
Succeeded by
Maurice Schwarzmann
Preceded by
TBD
Canadian Ambassador to the Netherlands
1976-1979
Succeeded by
Georges-Henri Blouin