Savane (album)

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Savane
Savane.jpg
Studio album by Ali Farka Touré
Released 17 July 2006 (UK)[1]
25 July 2006 (U.S.)
Recorded Hôtel Mandé, Bamako, 2004
Genre African Blues
Length 58:37
Label World Circuit
Producer Nick Gold
Ali Farka Touré chronology
In the Heart of the Moon
(2005)
Savane
(2006)
Ali and Toumani
(with Toumani Diabaté)
(2010)
Professional ratings
Aggregate scores
Source Rating
Metacritic 94% link
Review scores
Source Rating
OMM 5/5 stars link
The Guardian 5/5 stars link
Stylus Magazine A link
Pitchfork Media 8.1/10 link
PopMatters 8/10 link

Savane is the final solo album by Malian musician Ali Farka Touré. It is the third and final part of the Hôtel Mandé Sessions, featuring Touré and Toumani Diabaté, recorded by World Circuit head Nick Gold. The album was released posthumously by World Circuit on 17 July 2006,[1] more than four months after Touré's death.

The recording sessions at Hôtel Mandé in Bamako took place from June to July 2004.[2] Touré, suffering from cancer, had wanted to remain in Mali, so a temporary studio was set up on the top floor of the hotel.[2] Touré approved the final master of Savane just weeks before his death in March 2006.[3] He said of the album: "I know this is my best album ever. It has the most power and is the most different."[4]

Savane features a number of non-African blues musicians, such as Little George Sueref, Pee Wee Ellis, and also Touré's protégé since the age of 13, Afel Bocoum.

It was released to high critical acclaim, earning a 94 on Metacritic.[5] The album was also included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.[6]

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Erdi" – 4:42
  2. "Yer Bounda Fara" – 4:18
  3. "Beto" – 4:49
  4. "Savane" – 7:43
  5. "Soya" – 4:38
  6. "Penda Yoro" – 5:25
  7. "Machengoidi" – 3:35
  8. "Ledi Coumbe" – 3:16
  9. "Hanana" – 2:34
  10. "Soko Yhinka" – 5:05
  11. "Gambari Didi" – 3:49
  12. "Banga" – 3:48
  13. "N'Jarou" – 4:55

Personnel[edit]

  • Ali Farka Touréguitar, vocals, percussion
  • Mama Sissoko – ngoni
  • Bassekou Kouyate – ngoni
  • Dassy Sarré – ngoni
  • Afel Bocoumbacking vocals (tracks 6, 7, 13)
  • Alou Coulibaly – water calabash (7)
  • Ramata Diakite – backing vocals (3)
  • Massambou Wele Diallo – bolon (9)
  • Oumar Diallo – bass (13)
  • Fanga Diawara – njarka violin (1, 7, 9)
  • Fain Dueñas – percussion (1, 3, 6, 9, 13)
  • Pee Wee Ellistenor sax (1, 3, 13)
  • Souleye Kané – backing vocals (2, 6, 7, 10), calabash (3, 5, 11, 12)
  • Mamadou Kelli – voice (11)
  • Ali Magassa – backing vocals (2, 6, 7, 10), guitar (5)
  • Etienne Mbappé – bass (6)
  • Yacouba Moumouni – flute (12)
  • Hammer Sankare – backing vocals (2, 5, 6, 7, 13)
  • Sonny – bass (10)
  • Little George Sueref – harmonica (1, 6, 8)
  • Marriame Tounkara – backing vocals (12)
  • Brehima Toure – backing vocals (10)
  • Oumar Touré – backing vocals (2, 6, 7, 10), congas (3)
  • Yves Wernert – bass (1)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Ali Farka Toure: Savane (2006): CD". HMV. Retrieved 23 January 2011. 
  2. ^ a b Ben Sisario (23 July 2006). "Nick Gold, the Musical Matchmaker Who Gave Mali the Blues". The New York Times. Retrieved 23 January 2011. 
  3. ^ "Ali Farka Toure::Biography". World Circuit. Retrieved 23 January 2011. 
  4. ^ "Ali Farka Toure::Savane". World Circuit. Retrieved 23 January 2011. 
  5. ^ Ali Farka Toure: Savane (2006): Reviews
  6. ^ Robert Dimery; Michael Lydon (2010-03-23). 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die: Revised and Updated Edition. Universe. ISBN 0-7893-2074-6. 

External links[edit]