Save Me (The Tea Party song)

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"Save Me"
Promo CD Single, CDPRO 801, Canada
Single by The Tea Party
from the album Splendor Solis
Released 1993
Format CD
Recorded White Crow Audio (Burlington, Vermont)
Genre Rock
Length 6:34
Label EMI Music Canada
Writer(s) The Tea Party
Producer(s) Jeff Martin
The Tea Party singles chronology
"The River"
(1993)
"Save Me"
(1993)
"A Certain Slant of Light"
(1994)

"Save Me" is a song by Canadian rock band The Tea Party. It was released as a promotional single in Canada.[1] The music video was shot in Toronto, directed by Floria Sigismondi.

"Save Me" features Jeff Martin playing guitar with violin bow (not unlike Jimmy Page) by setting the height of the strings to mimic a violin.[2] The song was written in 1991, and was first recorded for The Tea Party's eponymous album. Jeff Martin has said it is an apology to women and to their treatment by men.

"One Canadian magazine, reviewing a Tea Party gig noted '(the band) then went into their power show number "Save Me". Through an accomplished and strongly delivered vocal arrangement and many different interwoven song parts, all on top of cultured yet heavy guitar the band really hit its focus. The spirituality within the band came out in this song as they hushed down about eight minutes in and broke into Daniel Lanois' "The Maker", and then into Hendrix's "Third Stone From the Sun". They were stunning musical maneuvers...'"[3]

A semi-acoustic version with hurdy-gurdy, electric guitar, Indian tambura, shekere and goblet drums was recorded in August 1995 at Studio Morin Heights (Morin Heights) for Alhambra, but appears as a B-side on the "Release" single and the European Triptych Special Tour Edition 2000 album.

Track listing[edit]

  1. "Save Me (edit)"
  2. "Save Me"
  3. "The River (remastered)"

References[edit]

  1. ^ splendor solis era The Tea Party a visual discography Accessed 17 April 2007
  2. ^ Stuart Chatwood, In Tangents The Tea Party Collection 2000, CD, EMI Music Canada, Mississauga.
  3. ^ Andrew Tanner, Turning music into gold April 1994, Beat, Melbourne, Australia.

External links[edit]