Say Nothing (book)

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Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland
Say Nothing (Patrick Radden Keefe).png
Cover of first edition
AuthorPatrick Radden Keefe
Audio read byMatthew Blaney[1]
Cover artistStefano Archetti (photo)
Oliver Munday (design)
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
SubjectThe Troubles
PublisherDoubleday
Publication date
February 26, 2019
Media typePrint (Hardcover)
Pages464
Awards2019 Orwell Prize for Political Writing
ISBN978-0-385-52131-4
364.152/3092
LC ClassHV6574.G7 K44 2019

Say Nothing: A True Story of Murder and Memory in Northern Ireland is a 2019 book by Patrick Radden Keefe. Keefe began researching and writing the book after reading the obituary for Dolours Price in 2013.[2]

Summary[edit]

The books concerns the Troubles in Northern Ireland, beginning with the 1972 murder of Jean McConville.

Title[edit]

The book's title is taken from the poem "Whatever You Say, Say Nothing" by Irish Nobel laureate Seamus Heaney from his collection North (1975).[2]

Publication[edit]

Say Nothing was first published in hardcover by Doubleday on February 26, 2019.[3]

The book debuted at number seven on the The New York Times Hardcover Nonfiction best-sellers list on March 17, 2019.[4] It spent six weeks on the list.[5]

The book debuted at number five on the The New York Times Combined Print & E-Book Nonfiction best-sellers list on March 17, 2019.[6] It spent six weeks on the list.[7]

Reception[edit]

The book has received critical acclaim. The review aggregator website Book Marks reported that 52% of critics gave the book a "rave" review, whilst the other 48% of the critics expressed "positive" impressions, based on a sample of 21 reviews.[8]

Jennifer Szalai of The New York Times wrote, "Keefe's narrative is an architectural feat, expertly constructed out of complex and contentious material, arranged and balanced just so."[9]

The book was named one of the top ten books of 2019 by both the New York Times Book Review[10] and the Washington Post.[11]

2019 National Book Critics Circle Award (Nonfiction) winner.[12]

References[edit]