Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei
SayonaraZetsubouSensei vol1 Cover.jpg
Cover of the first manga volume
さよなら絶望先生
(Sayonara Zetsubō Sensei)
GenreDark comedy, satire[1]
Manga
Written byKōji Kumeta
Published byKodansha
English publisher
MagazineWeekly Shōnen Magazine
DemographicShōnen
Original runApril 27, 2005June 13, 2012
Volumes30 (List of volumes)
Anime television series
Directed byAkiyuki Shinbo
Produced byAtsushi Moriyama (King Records)
Written byKenichi Kanemaki
Music byTomoki Hasegawa
StudioShaft
Licensed by
Original networkTVK, CTC, TV Saitama, Sun TV, Tokyo MX, TV Aichi, KBS, Kids Station
Original run July 7, 2007 September 22, 2007
Episodes12 (List of episodes)
Anime television series
(Zoku) Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei
Directed by
Produced byAtsushi Moriyama (King Records)
Written by
Music byTomoki Hasegawa
StudioShaft
Licensed by
Nozomi Entertainment
Original networkTVK, CTC, TV Saitama, Sun TV, Tokyo MX, TV Aichi, KBS, BS11 Digital, Kids Station
Original run January 5, 2008 March 29, 2008
Episodes13 (List of episodes)
Original video animation
(Goku) Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei
Directed by
  • Akiyuki Shinbo
  • Yukihiro Miyamoto[a]
Produced by
  • Atsushi Moriyama (King Records)
  • Hiroaki Morita (Kodansha)
  • Masayuki Haryu (Kodansha)
Written by
  • Shaft[b]
  • Akiyuki Shinbo
Music byTomoki Hasegawa
StudioShaft
Licensed by
Nozomi Entertainment
Released October 17, 2008 February 17, 2009
Runtime24–25 minutes
Episodes3 (List of episodes)
Anime television series
(Zan) Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei
Directed by
  • Akiyuki Shinbo
  • Yukihiro Miyamoto[a]
Produced byJunnosuke Miyamoto (King Records)
Written by
  • Shaft[b]
  • Akiyuki Shinbo
Music byTomoki Hasegawa
StudioShaft
Licensed by
Nozomi Entertainment
Original networkTVK, CTC, TV Saitama, Sun TV, Tokyo MX, TV Aichi, KBS, BS11 Digital
Original run July 4, 2009 September 26, 2009
Episodes13 (List of episodes)
Original video animation
(Zan) Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei Bangaichi
Directed by
  • Akiyuki Shinbo
  • Yukihiro Miyamoto[a]
Produced byJunnosuke Miyamoto (King Records)
Written by
  • Shaft[b]
  • Akiyuki Shinbo
Music byTomoki Hasegawa
StudioShaft
Licensed by
Nozomi Entertainment
Released November 17, 2009 February 17, 2010
Runtime26–28 minutes
Episodes2 (List of episodes)
Original video animation
Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei Special
Directed byAkiyuki Shinbo
Produced byJunnosuke Miyamoto (King Records)
Written by
  • Shaft[b]
  • Akiyuki Shinbo
Music byTomoki Hasegawa
StudioShaft
ReleasedJanuary 31, 2012
Runtime27 minutes
Episodes1
Wikipe-tan face.svg Anime and manga portal

Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei (Japanese: さよなら絶望先生, Hepburn: Sayonara Zetsubō Sensei, lit. Goodbye, Mr. Despair) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Kōji Kumeta. It was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Shōnen Magazine from April 2005 to June 2012, with its chapters collected in 30 tankōbon volumes. The series follows Nozomu Itoshiki, a teacher who takes all aspects of life, word, and culture in the most negative light possible. The series satirizes politics, media, and Japanese society. The manga was adapted into three anime television series and two sets of original video animations (OVAs) animated by Shaft between 2007 and 2010. In 2007, the manga received the 31st Kodansha Manga Award for the shōnen category.

Plot and setting[edit]

Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei revolves around a very pessimistic high school teacher named Nozomu Itoshiki who, at the very beginning of the series, tries to hang himself on a sakura tree. He is saved by an extremely optimistic student known only as Kafuka Fuura (though in her effort to save his life, she almost kills him). She explains to him that it is simply unimaginable that he would hang himself on such a nice day, especially in front of such beautiful trees. She decides to nickname Nozomu "Pink Supervisor" (桃色係長, Momoiro Kakarichō), and offers to pay him fifty yen to call him by that nickname. After having enough of the strange Kafuka, Nozomu bolts to the school and starts his homeroom class, but the attempt to escape was in vain as he finds that she is one of his students. Not only that, but Kafuka is just the tip of the iceberg, due to each and every student in his class representing a new personality quirk or bizarre obsession, posing challenges that he must overcome in spite of himself.

Each chapter or episode of the series revolves around a particular aspect of life, Japanese culture, or a common phrase in the Japanese language. Typically, this involves the subject being taken either to its most logical extreme (a discussion of amakudari, the practice of "descending" from the public to the private sector, results in Nozomu "descending" until he reaches his previous life), or taken literally (in Nozomu's family, omiai, normally a meeting between a potential match in an arranged marriage, is instead a marriage made official by eye-contact). On other occasions, Nozomu challenges his students to think about the negative aspects of something usually considered positive. These in-depth, off-kilter analyses (along with the reactions of the students according to their own personality quirks) are usually brought to a head with a punchline based on the overall premise, or more rarely, a non-sequitur gag or piece of fan service.

While ostensibly set in the present day relative to its original serialization, the manga uses a variety of aesthetic tropes that evoke the Taishō period, the relatively liberal period in Japan before the rise of militarism in the Shōwa period. Many aesthetic aspects are meant to evoke Taishō liberalism, Taishō Romanticism (see Japanese literature) and Taishō arts (see Hanshinkan Modernism). This is exemplified by Nozomu and Matoi consistently wearing a kimono and hakama (an obsolete style of Japanese school uniforms in the late 1800s), but is also evident in stylistic choices such as the anachronistic appearance of architecture, vehicles, and technology indicative of the Taishō period. However, the fashion of women typically follows the modern girl trend, which is a break from the Meiji period and signifies the style of the Taishō period.

Chapter titles are oblique references to literature, modified to suit the needs of the chapter. The chapter title pages are drawn to resemble karuta cards, with an illustration in a silhouetted kiri-e style. The anime carries this further through a washed-out, grainy visual style that mimics film, and frequent use of katakana (rather than hiragana) as okurigana. The anime also regularly refers to the date as though Emperor Hirohito were still alive, such that Heisei 20 (the twentieth year of Emperor Akihito's reign, or 2008 by the Gregorian calendar) becomes "Shōwa 83".

Media[edit]

Manga[edit]

Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei is written and illustrated by Kōji Kumeta. It was serialized in Kodansha's Weekly Shōnen Magazine from April 27, 2005 to June 13, 2012.[2][3] Kodansha collected its chapters in thirty tankōbon volumes, released from September 16, 2005 and August 17, 2012.[4][5]

In North America, the manga was licensed for English release by Del Rey Manga.[6] Eight volumes were released from February 24, 2009 to November 23, 2010.[7][8] The series was license rescued by Kodansha USA in 2010.[9] They released volume 9–14 from June 21, 2011 to April 3, 2012.[10][11]

Anime[edit]

Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei was adapted into a 12-episode anime television series, directed by Akiyuki Shinbo and animated by Shaft. It aired in Japan on TV Kanagawa and other networks between July 7 and September 23, 2007.[12] The first opening theme is "Hito Toshite Jiku ga Bureteiru" (人として軸がぶれている, "As a Human, I'm Quite Warped"), performed by Kenji Ohtsuki featuring Ai Nonaka, Marina Inoue, Yū Kobayashi, Miyuki Sawashiro and Ryōko Shintani. The second opening theme is "Gōin ni Mai Yeah" (強引niマイYeah~), performed by Ai Nonaka, Marina Inoue, Yū Kobayashi, Miyuki Sawashiro and Ryōko Shintani. The ending theme is "Zessei Bijin" (絶世美人, "Absolute Beauty"), performed by Ai Nonaka, Marina Inoue, Yū Kobayashi and Ryōko Shintani.[13] A special 50-minute DVD summary episode titled Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei Jo: Zetsubō Shōjo Senshū (さよなら絶望先生 序〜絶望少女撰集, lit. "Goodbye, Mr. Despair Preface: Despair Girls Collection") was released on January 1, 2008.[14] A second DVD summary episode was released on August 27, 2008.[15]

A 13-episode second season, titled (Zoku) Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei (【俗・】さよなら絶望先生), was broadcast from January 5 to March 29, 2008.[16][17] The opening theme is "Kūsō Rumba" (空想ルンバ), performed by Kenji Ohtsuki and Zetsubō Shōjo-tachi. The opening theme for episode 7 is {{nihongo|Lyricure Go Go!|リリキュアGOGO!), performed by Ai Nonaka, Marina Inoue and Ryōko Shintani. The series' three ending themes are "Koiji Romanesque" (恋路ロマネスク), performed by Zetsubō Shōjo-tachi, "Marionette" (マリオネット, Marionetto) by ROLLY and Zetsubō Shōjo-tachi, and "Omamori" (オマモリ), performed by Zetsubō Shōjo-tachi.[18] A 3-episode original animation DVD (OAD), titled Goku: Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei (獄・さよなら絶望先生), was released on October 17, December 10, 2008 and February 17, 2009.[19][20]

A 13-episode third season, titled Zan: Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei (懺・さよなら絶望先生, literally Repent: Goodbye, Mr. Despair), was broadcast from July 4 to September 26, 2009.[21] The opening theme is "Ringo Mogire Beam!" (林檎もぎれビーム!), performed by Kenji Ohtsuki and Zetsubō Shōjo-tachi. The first ending theme is "Zetsubō Restaurant" (絶望レストラン), performed by Zetsubō Shōjo-tachi, and the second ending theme is "Kurayami Shinchū Sōshisōai" (暗闇心中相思相愛), performed by Hiroshi Kamiya.[22] A 2-episode OAD, titled Zan: Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei Bangaichi (懺・さよなら絶望先生 番外地, literally Repent: Goodbye, Mr. Despair No Man's Land), was released on November 17, 2009 and February 17, 2010.[23][24] A special episode was offered to people who bought all three of Japanese Blu-ray Disc Boxes of the series and was released on January 31, 2012.[25][26]

In North America, Media Blasters licensed the first Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei anime series in February 2010 and was going to release the first English-subtitled DVD volumes in May 2010.[27] However, the series was put on hold until March 2013, when they dropped the rights to the series.[28] At Anime Expo 2019, it was announced that Nozomi Entertainment licensed the series for a Blu-ray release in 2020.[29] In May 2021, Nozomi Entertainment explained that the series' release was delayed due to lack of scripts in Japan. Besides this, the company announced that they will release the entire anime franchise, including all three television anime seasons and both OVAs.[30]

Internet radio show[edit]

An Internet radio show titled Sayonara Zetsubō Hōsō (さよなら絶望放送, lit. Goodbye Despair Broadcast), produced by Frontier Works organized by Hirotaka Tahara and directed by Futoshi Satō, began airing on August 28, 2007 on Animate TV. The show is co-hosted by Hiroshi Kamiya and Ryōko Shintani who played Nozomu Itoshiki and Nami Hitō respectively in the anime. Each episode started with a mini drama between Nozomu and Nami then followed by corners replying mails from listeners in several theme related to the series.[31] The show is often referred as SZBH because of the in-show call sign. As of the 180th episode, the show has received over 153,000 mails.

The show features six special broadcast. The first one was aired on November 27, 2007 titled Tokimeki Nāmin Night (ときめきナーミンナイト (TMNN)) which acts as if Ryōko Shintani is a sole host with Hiroshi Kamiya as a guest. The second and third were aired as the second and third season breakthrough commemoration on February 26, 2008 and May 27, 2008 which respectively titled Sayonara Zetsubō Hōsō Senshū: Nyo (さよなら絶望放送撰集・如) and Let's Lilycure Radio (Let's リリキュラジオ! (LLLR)). The fourth special broadcast titled Toki wo Kakeru Radio (時をかけるラジオ) was aired on November 24, 2008 and featured several still image of the in-show character, Sanosuke, marathoning from Kodansha office to the recording studio. The fifth special broadcast was aired on December 31, 2008 and titled Botsu: Sayonara Zetsubō Hōsō (没・さよなら絶望放送). The sixth one was aired on April 15, 2009, titled The Kamiya Hiroshi Show (ザ・神谷浩史ショー, call sign: TKHS).

A special radio event titled Zoku Sayonara Zetsubō Hōsō: SZBH Kaizokuban (賊・さよなら絶望放送~SZBH海賊盤) was held on March 18, 2008 featuring Yū Kobayashi, who plays Kaere Kimura, with Kenji Ōtsuki and Narasaki as guests. The recording of the event was released later as the third DJCD volume. A second radio event titled Kōkai Rokuon Event: Hibiya Kōen Dai-Ongakudō: Yaon (後悔録音イベント≪日比谷公園大音楽堂〜谷怨〜≫) was held on March 24, 2009, featuring Ai Nonaka and Takahiro Mizushima, who play Kafuka Fuura and Jun Kudō, respectively. The recording of this event was released as the ninth DJCD. A total of 21 CDs for the show have been released by King Records. Ten of the CDs contain newly recorded episodes, while the fifth and sixth CDs are the collections of the popular episodes.

Reception[edit]

In 2007, the manga received the 31st Kodansha Manga Award for the shōnen category.[32]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Credited as Chief Director (チーフ演出, Chīfu Enshutsu).
  2. ^ a b c d e Credited under the collective pen name Fuyashi Tō.
  3. ^ Credited as Composition (構成, Kōsei).

References[edit]

  1. ^ Santos, Carlo (November 20, 2012). "A Ghost of a Chance - RIGHT TURN ONLY!!". Anime News Network. Retrieved September 22, 2018.
  2. ^ 週刊少年マガジン第22・23合併号 (in Japanese). Kodansha. Archived from the original on April 28, 2005. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  3. ^ 久米田康治「さよなら絶望先生」完結、7年超の連載に幕. Natalie (in Japanese). Natasha, Inc. June 13, 2012. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  4. ^ さよなら絶望先生(1) (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  5. ^ さよなら絶望先生(30)<完> (in Japanese). Kodansha. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  6. ^ Koulikov, Mikhail (2008-04-19). "Del Rey Adds Gakuen Prince, Samurai 7, Zetsubo Sensei". Anime News Network. Retrieved 2008-04-19.
  7. ^ Ellingwood, Holly (February 21, 2009). "Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei: The Power of Negative Thinking Vol. 1 (Advance Review)". activeAnime. Archived from the original on February 12, 2017. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  8. ^ Ellingwood, Holly (January 31, 2011). "Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei: The Power of Negative Thinking Vol. 8". activeAnime. Archived from the original on April 24, 2014. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  9. ^ Loo, Egan (December 11, 2010). "Kodansha USA Adds Phoenix Wright, Monster Hunter, Deltora Quest". Anime News Network. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  10. ^ "Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei 9". Random House. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  11. ^ "Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei 14". Random House. Archived from the original on February 1, 2013. Retrieved April 17, 2021.
  12. ^ さよなら絶望先生. akiba-souken.com (in Japanese). Kakaku.com. Archived from the original on May 11, 2021. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  13. ^ さよなら絶望先生. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  14. ^ さよなら絶望先生 序~絶望少女撰集~ (in Japanese). Books Kinokuniya. Archived from the original on May 11, 2021. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  15. ^ さよなら絶望先生 序~俗・絶望少女撰集~ (in Japanese). Books Kinokuniya. Archived from the original on May 11, 2021. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  16. ^ Loo, Egan (October 9, 2007). "Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei's 2nd Season in 2008 Confirmed". Retrieved December 10, 2007.
  17. ^ 俗・さよなら絶望先生. akiba-souken.com (in Japanese). Kakaku.com. Archived from the original on May 11, 2021. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  18. ^ 【俗・】さよなら絶望先生. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on November 8, 2020. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  19. ^ Loo, Egan (July 8, 2008). "Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei Manga to Bundle 2 Anime DVDs". Anime News Network. Retrieved July 9, 2008.
  20. ^ Loo, Egan (December 16, 2008). "Japanese Animation DVD Ranking, December 9-15". Anime News Network. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  21. ^ 懺・さよなら絶望先生. akiba-souken.com (in Japanese). Kakaku.com. Archived from the original on May 11, 2021. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  22. ^ 【懺・】さよなら絶望先生. Media Arts Database (in Japanese). Agency for Cultural Affairs. Archived from the original on September 17, 2020. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  23. ^ Loo, Egan (August 16, 2009). "Sayonara Zetsubō Sensei Manga Bundles Original Anime (Updated)". Anime News Network. Retrieved August 16, 2009.
  24. ^ 動く先生とついにさよなら?絶望先生OAD付最新刊発売. Natalie (in Japanese). Natasha, Inc. February 18, 2010. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  25. ^ Loo, Egan (March 7, 2011). "New Zetsubō Sensei Episode Offered to BD Box Buyers". Anime News Network. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  26. ^ さよなら絶望先生 Blu-ray BOX (in Japanese). King Records. Retrieved May 11, 2021. 「さよなら絶望先生」Blu-ray BOXシリーズ全巻購入者特典の「完全新作話オリジナルBlu-ray DISC」の発送ですが、 こちら2012年1月末日時点で全てのご発送が完了しております。
  27. ^ Loo, Egan (February 18, 2010). "Media Blasters Confirms Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei License". Anime News Network. Retrieved February 18, 2010.
  28. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (March 8, 2013). "Media Blasters No Longer Has Rights to Bakuman, Kenshin, Berserk Anime (Updated)". Anime News Network. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  29. ^ Sherman, Jennifer (July 6, 2019). "Right Stuf, Nozomi Ent. Add Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei, A.D. Police, El-Hazard Anime". Anime News Network. Retrieved July 6, 2019.
  30. ^ Hazra, Adriana (May 11, 2021). "Nozomi Ent. to Release All of 'Sayonara, Zetsubou-Sensei' Anime Franchise". Anime News Network. Retrieved May 11, 2021.
  31. ^ "Sayonara Zetsubō Hōsō official page" (in Japanese). Retrieved 2009-07-08.
  32. ^ "Kodansha Manga Awards Page" (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 2010-07-03. Retrieved 2007-07-17.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]