Scantling

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Scantling is a measurement of prescribed size, dimensions, or cross sectional areas.

Shipping[edit]

In shipbuilding, the scantling refers to the collective dimensions of the framing (apart from the keel) to which planks or plates are attached to form the hull.[1] The word is most often used in the plural to describe how much structural strength in the form of girders, I-beams, etc. is in a given section. The scantling length refers to the structural length of a ship.

In shipping, a "full scantling vessel" is understood to be a geared ship, that can reach all parts of its own cargo spaces with its own gear.

Timber and stone[edit]

In regard to timber the scantling is (also "the scantlings are") the thickness and breadth, the sectional dimensions; in the case of stone the dimensions of thickness, breadth and length.

The word is a variation of scantillon, a carpenter's or stonemason's measuring tool, also used of the measurements taken by it, and of a piece of timber of small size cut as a sample. Sometimes synonymous with story pole. The Old French escantillon, mod. échantillon, is usually taken to be related to Italian scandaglio, sounding-line (Latin scandere, to climb; cf. scansio, the metrical scansion). It was probably influenced by cantel, cantle, a small piece, a corner piece.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Keegan, John (1989). The Price of Admiralty. New York: Viking. p. 280. ISBN 0-670-81416-4.