Sceptre Incorporated

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Sceptre Incorporated
Manufacturer
Industry Electronics
Founded Industry, California, U.S. (1984)
Headquarters United States
Products LCD TV
Website www.sceptre.com

Sceptre (pronounced 'septər' ) is a privately owned American consumer-electronics producer headquartered in City of Industry, California. Sceptre is best known for its affordable LED, LCD, and 4K displays. Its other products include audio, car cams, and car batteries. Sceptre Inc. has also produced CRT televisions, notebook PCs, touch screens, CRT computer monitors, WiFi networking products, USB flash drives and cameras.

History[edit]

From its earliest beginnings in 1984 until the mid-90s, Sceptre exclusively specialized in manufacturing and selling computer monitors. One of Sceptre’s most important partnerships during this period was with Hartco, a leading distributor in the Canadian electronics market.

As a play on words that represents its focus on computer monitors, Sceptre adopted the Komodo dragon as its mascot, and named it Brutus.[1] The company regularly donated a substantial amount of its proceeds to the Zoological Society of San Diego.[2]

With a background in developing LCD displays since 1993, Sceptre then made the decision to transition to manufacturing and whole selling LCD TVs. Though the TVs are often equipped with higher resolution and QAM tuner, the LCD monitors can function as both a TV and monitor[3]

Products[edit]

Sceptre laid its roots early in mass-produced monitors with the monochrome display and then easily transitioned to producing color displays.

In line with designing computer monitors, Sceptre also ventured into producing electronic notebooks, with successful results. PC Magazine concluded that The Sceptre Soundx Series 3000 Pentium 90 and 75 performed “at or near the top” of their competitive market after testing 80 different notebooks.[4]

In 2013, Sceptre added Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) to many of its LCD TVs.[5] This technology allows users to connect smartphones and tablets to the TV via a cable that has an HDMI connector on end and an MHL connector on the other. Sceptre designed its first 4K UHD TV in late 2014 with a 49-inch model, the U500CV-UMK. Currently, its 4K models come equipped with HDMI 2.0, HDCP 2.2 and MEMC 120. At 60 frames per second, HDMI 2.0 transports 4K content at double the speed of 1.4.[6] Motion Estimation/Motion Compensation (MEMC) smooths out blurring as objects are in motion on the screen, at approximately 120 frames per second. This feature is highly effective during action sequences, such as the kind found in sports, but has less relevance during fictional programming, such as sitcoms, when people and objects are frequently stationary or not moving at high speeds.[7]

As of 2016, Sceptre has designed 9 different 4K models, ranging between 43 and 65 inches.

Community Outreach[edit]

Since its founding, Sceptre has played an active role in the Los Angeles community. It has participated in numerous Cherry Festivals, Arcadia Lunar New Year Festival, and Walnut’s 2015 Relay for Life.[8]

Timeline[edit]

Timeline of Sceptre's consumer electronics:

  • 1984 Monochrome/ Color Display for PC
  • 1993 LCD Display for the Industry
  • 2000 LCD TV for CE Industry
  • 2006 LCD Display for digital signage
  • 2009 LED Display for TV/Monitor
  • 2010 Intelligent Tool-less TV desk/stand
  • 2011 LED Display for 3D HDTV
  • 2012 LED Display for 3D HDTV with Internet Protocol Television (IPTV)
  • 2013 LED large screen HDTV with touch screen panel
  • 2014 4K Ultra High Definition TV
  • 2015 4K UHD with Touch Screen Panel

Other[edit]

The 19" Sceptre LED TV was named one of the most energy efficient TVs in 2015.[9]

Sceptre computers were prominently displayed throughout the television series Earth: Final Conflict.

Started a "Hi-End" Brand in 2012 called oCosmo which share similar design features to their current Sceptre brand TVs. Even down to the metallic brush bezel on their 2014 models. It is unclear what differences, if any, the actual hardware has compared to their Sceptre counterparts.[10][11][12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Inc, Ziff Davis (1997-08-01). PC Mag. Ziff Davis, Inc. 
  2. ^ Inc, Ziff Davis (1995-12-19). PC Mag. Ziff Davis, Inc. 
  3. ^ "Welcome to SCEPTRE Inc.". www.sceptre.com. Retrieved 2016-04-13. 
  4. ^ Inc, Ziff Davis (1995-12-19). PC Mag. Ziff Davis, Inc. 
  5. ^ "Sceptre unveils new TVs with integrated MHL technology". SlashGear. Retrieved 2016-04-13. 
  6. ^ "Ultra HD 4K TV Cheat Sheet". CNET. Retrieved 2016-04-13. 
  7. ^ "What is the 'Soap Opera Effect'?". CNET. Retrieved 2016-04-13. 
  8. ^ "Arcadia hosts first Lunar New Year festival". www.pasadenastarnews.com. Retrieved 2016-04-13. 
  9. ^ http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=most_efficient.me_tvs_under35_inches
  10. ^ Smith, Rich. "The Mysterious Company Behind the Best-Selling TV in America". www.fool.com. Retrieved 2016-04-13. 
  11. ^ "Ocosmo? Sceptre? A Low-Priced TV By Any Other Name". www.tvpredictions.com. Retrieved 2016-04-13. 
  12. ^ oCOSMO CE4001/CE4001-A 40-Inch 1080p 60Hz LED TV. 

External links[edit]