Schneider ES-59

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ES-59 Arrow
Role Sailplane
National origin Australia
Manufacturer Schneider
Designer Edmund Schneider
First flight 14 April 1962
Number built 10

The Schneider ES-59 Arrow is a sailplane designed and manufactured in Adelaide, South Australia in the early 1960s. The Arrow was manufactured with a one-piece wing of 13.23 metres span. It was the first Australian-built sailplane to compete in the World Gliding Championships, 1963 in Argentina. The Arrow has wood/fabric wings and tail and a wood fuselage.

Specifications[edit]

Data from The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde Volume II[1]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 6.8 m (22 ft 4 in)
  • Wingspan: 13.24 m (43 ft 5 in)
  • Wing area: 11 m2 (120 sq ft)
  • Aspect ratio: 16
  • Airfoil: Root: NACA 63 618, Mid: NACA 63 614, Tip: Joukowsky 12% mod.
  • Empty weight: 170 kg (375 lb)
  • Gross weight: 280 kg (617 lb)

Performance

  • Stall speed: 59.5 km/h (37 mph; 32 kn)
  • Never exceed speed: 238 km/h (148 mph; 129 kn)
  • Rough air speed max: 138.5 km/h (86.1 mph; 74.8 kn)
  • Aerotow speed: 130 km/h (80.8 mph; 70.2 kn)
  • Winch launch speed: 115 km/h (71.5 mph; 62.1 kn)
  • Terminal velocity: with full airbrakes 232 km/h (144 mph; 125 kn)
  • g limits: +5 -2.5 at 138.5 km/h (86.1 mph; 74.8 kn), +4 -0 at 250 km/h (155.3 mph; 135.0 kn)
  • Maximum glide ratio: 27.8 at 76 km/h (47.2 mph; 41.0 kn)
  • Rate of sink: 0.73 m/s (144 ft/min) at 68 km/h (42.3 mph; 36.7 kn)
  • Wing loading: 25.5 kg/m2 (5.2 lb/sq ft)

See also[edit]

Related development


References[edit]

  1. ^ Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson (1963). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde Volume II (in English, French, and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 28–29. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Sailplane Directory. Schneider. Online. October 7, 2007.
  • Hardy, Michael (1982). Gliders and Sailplanes of the World. Shepperton: Ian Allan. p. 99. 
  • Shenstone, B.S.; K.G. Wilkinson (1963). The World's Sailplanes:Die Segelflugzeuge der Welt:Les Planeurs du Monde Volume II (in English, French, and German) (1st ed.). Zurich: Organisation Scientifique et Technique Internationale du Vol a Voile (OSTIV) and Schweizer Aero-Revue. pp. 28–29.