Schradan

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Schradan
Schradan.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Octamethyldiphosphoric tetraamide
Other names
OMPA, Octamethyl pyrophosphoramide
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.005.275 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 205-801-0
KEGG
RTECS number
  • UX5950000
UNII
UN number 3018
  • InChI=1S/C8H24N4O3P2/c1-9(2)16(13,10(3)4)15-17(14,11(5)6)12(7)8/h1-8H3
    Key: SZKKRCSOSQAJDE-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • CN(C)P(=O)(N(C)C)OP(=O)(N(C)C)N(C)C
Properties
C8H24N4O3P2
Molar mass 286.253 g·mol−1
Density 1.09
Hazards
Occupational safety and health (OHS/OSH):
Main hazards
Toxic
GHS labelling:
GHS06: ToxicGHS08: Health hazard
Danger
H300, H310, H330, H371, H373, H412
P260, P262, P264, P270, P271, P273, P280, P284, P301+P310, P302+P350, P304+P340, P309+P311, P310, P314, P320, P321, P322, P330, P361, P363, P403+P233, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

Schradan, named after Gerhard Schrader, is an obsolete organophosphate insecticide.[1] Schradan itself is a weak cholinesterase inhibitor and requires metabolic activation to become active.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ GARDINER, JE; KILBY, BA (April 1952). "Biochemistry of organic phosphorus insecticides. I. The mammalian metabolism of bis(dimethylamino) phosphonous anhydride (Schradan)". The Biochemical Journal. 51 (1): 78–85. doi:10.1042/bj0510078. PMC 1197790. PMID 14944535.
  2. ^ DAVISON, AN (October 1955). "The conversion of schra dan (OMPA) and parathion into inhibitors of cholinesterase by mammalian liver". The Biochemical Journal. 61 (2): 203–9. doi:10.1042/bj0610203. PMC 1215773. PMID 13260199.