Scorzonera

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Scorzonera
Scorzonera purpurea rosea0.jpg
Scorzonera purpurea
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Subfamily: Cichorioideae
Tribe: Cichorieae[1]
Genus: Scorzonera
L.
Synonyms[1]

Scorzonera is a genus of flowering plants in the dandelion tribe within the daisy family. [2][3]

They are distributed in Europe, Asia,[3] and Africa.[4] Its center of diversity is in the Mediterranean.[5] Well-known species include the edible black salsify (Scorzonera hispanica). Scorzonera tau-saghyz is a source of natural rubber.[6][7][8]

Scorzonera is recorded as a food plant for the larva of the Nutmeg, a species of moth.

Species[edit]

The genus contains the following species.[1][9]

  1. S. acanthoclada
  2. S. acantholimon
  3. S. acuminata
  4. S. adilii
  5. S. affinis
  6. S. alaica
  7. S. alba
  8. S. albertoregelia
  9. S. albicans
  10. S. albicaulis
  11. S. amasiana
  12. S. angustifolia
  13. S. aragatzi
  14. S. araneosa
  15. S. argyrea
  16. S. aristata
  17. S. aucheriana
  18. S. austriaca
  19. S. baetica
  20. S. baldshuanica
  21. S. biebersteinii
  22. S. boissieri
  23. S. bracteosa
  24. S. bungei
  25. S. bupleurifolia
  26. S. bupleuroides
  27. S. caespitosa
  28. S. callosa
  29. S. calyculata
  30. S. capito
  31. S. chantavica
  32. S. charadzeae
  33. S. cinerea
  34. S. circumflexa
  35. S. codringtonii
  36. S. communis
  37. S. crassifolia
  38. S. cretica
  39. S. crispa
  40. S. crocifolia
  41. S. czerepanovii
  42. S. darreana
  43. S. davisii
  44. S. divaricata
  45. S. doriae
  46. S. drarii
  47. S. dzhawakhetica
  48. S. elata
  49. S. elongata
  50. S. ensifolia
  51. S. eriophora
  52. S. euphratica
  53. S. fengtiensis
  54. S. ferganica
  55. S. filifolia
  56. S. flaccida
  57. S. franchetii
  58. S. gageoides
  59. S. glabra
  60. S. gorovanica
  61. S. gracilis
  62. S. graminifolia
  63. S. grubovii
  64. S. helodes
  65. S. hieraciifolia
  66. S. hispanica – black salsify, Spanish salsify, viper's-grass, black oyster plant
  67. S. hispida
  68. S. hissarica
  69. S. hondae
  70. S. hotanica
  71. S. humifusa
  72. S. humilis – viper's grass
  73. S. ikonnikovii
  74. S. iliensis
  75. S. inaequiscapa
  76. S. incisa
  77. S. inconspicua
  78. S. intricata
  79. S. isophylla
  80. S. ispahanica
  81. S. joharchii
  82. S. kandavanica
  83. S. karabelensis[10]
  84. S. karataviensis
  85. S. ketzkhovelii
  86. S. ketzkhowelii
  87. S. koelpinioides
  88. S. kotschyi
  89. S. kozlowskyi
  90. S. kuhistanica
  91. S. lacera
  92. S. laciniata
  93. S. lamellata
  94. S. lanata
  95. S. lasiocarpa
  96. S. latifolia
  97. S. leptophylla
  98. S. libanotica
  99. S. limnophila
  100. S. lindbergii
  101. S. lipskyi
  102. S. litwinowii
  103. S. longiana
  104. S. longifolia
  105. S. longipapposa
  106. S. luntaiensis
  107. S. luristanica
  108. S. mackmeliana
  109. S. manshurica
  110. S. mariovoensis
  111. S. microcalathia
  112. S. mirabilis
  113. S. mollis
  114. S. mongolica
  115. S. mucida
  116. S. multifida
  117. S. muriculata
  118. S. musili
  119. S. nivalis
  120. S. ovata
  121. S. pachycephala
  122. S. pamirica
  123. S. papposa
  124. S. paradoxa
  125. S. parviflora
  126. S. persepolitana
  127. S. persica
  128. S. petrovii
  129. S. phaeopappa
  130. S. pisidica
  131. S. polyclada
  132. S. praetuberosa
  133. S. pratorum
  134. S. pseudodivaricata
  135. S. psychrophila
  136. S. pubescens
  137. S. pulchra
  138. S. pygmaea
  139. S. racemosa
  140. S. raddeana
  141. S. radians
  142. S. radiata
  143. S. ramosissima
  144. S. rawii
  145. S. renzii
  146. S. reverchonii
  147. S. rigida
  148. S. rugulosa
  149. S. rumicifolia
  150. S. rupicola
  151. S. safievii
  152. S. sahnea
  153. S. sandrasica
  154. S. schweinfurthii
  155. S. scopariiformis
  156. S. scyria
  157. S. seidlitzii
  158. S. semicana
  159. S. sericea
  160. S. sericeo-lanata
  161. S. serpentinica
  162. S. sinensis
  163. S. stenocephala
  164. S. stricta
  165. S. subacaulis
  166. S. subaphylla
  167. S. suberosa
  168. S. sublanata
  169. S. syriaca
  170. S. tadshikorum
  171. S. tau-saghyz
  172. S. tenax
  173. S. tenuisecta
  174. S. tianshanensis
  175. S. tomentosa
  176. S. tortuosissima
  177. S. tragapogonoides
  178. S. transiliensis
  179. S. troodea
  180. S. tuberculata
  181. S. tuberosa
  182. S. tunicata
  183. S. turkestania
  184. S. ulrichii
  185. S. undulata
  186. S. usbekistanica
  187. S. veratrifolia
  188. S. veresczaginii
  189. S. verrucosa
  190. S. villosa
  191. S. violacea
  192. S. virgata
  193. S. wendelboi
  194. S. woronowii
  195. S. xylobasis
  196. S. yemensis
  197. S. yildirimlii[4]

Etymology[edit]

One possible origin of the genus name is the French scorzonère ("viper’s grass").[3]

Secondary metabolites[edit]

Some Scorzonera species contain lactones, including the sesquiterpene lactones known as guaianolides.[11] Flavonoids found in Scorzonera include apigenin, kaempferol, luteolin, and quercetin.[12] Other secondary metabolites reported from the genus include caffeoylquinic acids, coumarins, lignans, stilbenoids, and triterpenoids.[13] One unique class of stilbenoid derivative was first isolated from Scorzonera humilis. They were named the tyrolobibenzyls after Tyrol in the eastern Alps, where the plant was collected.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Flann, C (ed) 2009+ Global Compositae Checklist
  2. ^ Bremer, K. (1994). Asteraceae: Cladistics and Classification. Timber Press, Portland. ISBN 978-0881922752. 
  3. ^ a b c Scorzonera. Flora of North America.
  4. ^ a b Duran, A. and E. Hamzaoglu. (2004). A new species of Scorzonera (Asteraceae) from South Anatolia, Turkey. Biologia-Bratislava 59(1), 47-50.
  5. ^ Karaer, F. and F. Celep. (2007). Rediscovery of Scorzonera amasiana Hausskn. and Bornm. – A threatened endemic species in Turkey. Bangladesh Journal of Botany 36(2), 139-44.
  6. ^ Buranov, A. U. and B. J. Elmuradov. (2010). Extraction and characterization of latex and natural rubber from rubber-bearing plants. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 58(2), 734-43.
  7. ^ Flora of China Vol. 20-21 Page 198 鸦葱属 ya cong shu Scorzonera Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 790. 1753.
  8. ^ Altervista Flora Italiana, genere Scorzonera includes photos and distribution maps
  9. ^ "The Plant List". Retrieved 22 June 2014. 
  10. ^ Parolly, G. and N. Kilian. (2003). Scorzonera karabelensis (Compositae), a new species from SW Anatolia, with a key to the subscapigerous Scorzonera species in Turkey. Willdenowia 33 327-35.
  11. ^ Zidorn, C. (2010). "Sesquiterpene lactones and their precursors as chemosystematic markers in the tribe Cichorieae of the Asteraceae". Phytochemistry (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). 69: 2270–96. ISSN 0031-9422. doi:10.1016/j.phytochem.2008.06.013. 
  12. ^ Sareedenchai, V. and C. Zidorn (2010). "Flavonoids as chemosystematic markers in the tribe Cichorieae of the Asteraceae". Biochemical Systematics and Ecology (Amsterdam, The Netherlands). 38: 935–57. ISSN 0305-1978. doi:10.1016/j.bse.2009.09.006. 
  13. ^ Jehle, M. et al. (2010). "Natural products from Scorzonera aristata (Asteraceae)". Natural Product Communications (Westerville, OH; USA). 5: 725–27. ISSN 1934-578X. 
  14. ^ Zidorn, C. et al. (2000). "Tyrolobibenzyls ‒ Novel secondary metabolites from Scorzonera humilis". Helvetica Chimica Acta (Zürich; Switzerland). 83: 2920–25. ISSN 0018-019X.