Scott Burrell

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Scott Burrell
Southern Connecticut Fighting Owls
PositionHead coach
LeagueNortheast-10 Conference
Personal information
Born (1971-01-12) January 12, 1971 (age 49)
New Haven, Connecticut
NationalityAmerican
Listed height6 ft 7 in (2.01 m)
Listed weight218 lb (99 kg)
Career information
High schoolHamden (Hamden, Connecticut)
CollegeUConn (1989–1993)
NBA draft1993 / Round: 1 / Pick: 20th overall
Selected by the Charlotte Hornets
Playing career1993–2006
PositionShooting guard / Small forward
Number24, 23, 2
Coaching career2006–present
Career history
As player:
19931997Charlotte Hornets
1997Golden State Warriors
1997–1998Chicago Bulls
19992000New Jersey Nets
2001Charlotte Hornets
2001–2002Fayetteville Patriots
2002–2003Shaanxi Gaitianli Kylins
2003–2004Red Bull Barako
2004–2005Idaho Stampede
2005Bilbao Berri
2005–2006Hitachi SunRockers
As coach:
2006–2007Colorado 14ers (assistant)
2007–2015Quinnipiac (assistant)
2015–presentSouthern Connecticut
Career highlights and awards
As head coach:

As player:

Career NBA statistics
Points2,649 (6.9 ppg)
Rebounds1,332 (3.5 rpg)
Assists527 (1.4 apg)
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com

Scott David Burrell (born January 12, 1971) is an American basketball coach and former player who is currently the men's basketball head coach at Southern Connecticut State University. He has played internationally and was also a professional baseball player.

In 1990, Burrell was drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays of MLB. He played in Minor League Baseball during the 1990 and 1991 seasons. After ending his baseball career, he was drafted in 1993 by the Charlotte Hornets of the NBA. He was later traded to the Golden State Warriors and then the Chicago Bulls, where he won a championship ring. He next played with the New Jersey Nets and then finished his NBA career with the Hornets in 2000–01. He played in other professional basketball leagues through the 2005–06 season.

Early life[edit]

Born in New Haven, Connecticut, Burrell was raised in nearby Hamden and attended Hamden High School.[1][2] At Hamden High, in addition to basketball, Burrell was a quarterback on the football team and pitcher on the baseball team.[3] Burrell was drafted by the Seattle Mariners in the first round of the 1989 Major League Baseball draft after graduating from high school.[4] Burrell initially planned on attending the University of Miami to play baseball, before University of Connecticut assistant basketball coach Howie Dickenman convinced Burrell to commit to Connecticut.[5]

College career[edit]

From 1989 to 1993, Burrell played at guard and forward for the Connecticut Huskies under Jim Calhoun.[1] As a freshman in 1989–90, Burrell averaged 8.2 points and 5.5 rebounds.[1] In 1990, Burrell was drafted by another baseball team, the Toronto Blue Jays, and Burrell spent the next two summers playing minor league baseball.[4]

As a junior in 1991–92, Burrell averaged a career high 16.3 points, and he had a career high 7.5 rebounds in 1990–91.[1] Burrell became the first player in NCAA basketball history to compile over 1,500 points, 750 rebounds, 275 assists and 300 steals.[2] Burrell is known for his full-court pass with one second on the clock to Tate George, who hit a shot as time expired to beat Clemson in the East Regional semi-final of the 1990 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament.[6][7]

Burrell went back to school and received his bachelor's degree in general studies from the University of Connecticut on May 8, 2010.[8]

Professional career[edit]

Minor league baseball (1990–1991)[edit]

After being drafted by the Toronto Blue Jays in the fifth round of the 1990 Major League Baseball draft, Burrell was a minor league baseball pitcher from 1990 to 1991, first with the St. Catharines Blue Jays in 1990 and splitting the 1991 season between the Myrtle Beach Hurricanes and St. Catharines Blue Jays. Burrell had a 3.71 ERA and 2–6 record as a minor league pitcher.[4]

Charlotte Hornets (1993–1997)[edit]

Burrell was selected by the Charlotte Hornets with the 20th overall pick in the 1993 NBA draft.[1]

He averaged 4.8 points per game during his rookie season, during which he missed 31 games due to knee, ankle, and Achilles tendon injuries.[2] In the 1994–95 season, Burrell played in 65 games with 62 starts and averaged 11.5 points and 5.7 rebounds.[1] Despite a season ending injury on April 1, 1995, Burrell finished third in NBA Most Improved Player Award votes.[2] On February 11, he also finished third at the AT&T Long-Distance Shootout.[2] During the 1995–96 NBA season, Burrell was limited to 20 games due to injuries, including Achilles tendon surgery.[2] After that season, Burrell would play mostly off the bench.[1]

Later NBA career (1997–2001)[edit]

On February 20, 1997, the Hornets traded Burrell to the Golden State Warriors for Donald Royal. Burrell averaged 5.9 points overall in 1996–97.[1] On September 22, 1997, the Warriors traded Burrell to the Chicago Bulls for Dickey Simpkins.[1] Bulls general manager Jerry Krause sought Burrell for his ability to play both forward spots.[9] During the season, in which the Bulls won the NBA championship, Burrell played 80 games with three starts and averaged 5.2 points and 2.5 rebounds.[1] On February 2, 1998, Burrell scored a season high 24 points in 18 minutes in a 111–72 victory over the Denver Nuggets.[2] The Last Dance, a 2020 ESPN and Netflix documentary series on Burrell's Bulls teammate Michael Jordan, depicts Burrell as a common target of Jordan's competitive banter.[10]

Shortly after the 1998–99 NBA lockout ended, the Bulls released Burrell on January 25, 1999.[1][9] Burrell signed as a free agent with the New Jersey Nets nearly a week later on February 3; he would average 6.6 points in 1999 and 6.1 points in 1999–2000 with the Nets.[1] Burrell had successful hand and knee surgery on April 27, 2000.[2]

On April 10, 2001, Burrell returned to the Charlotte Hornets, where he played four games off the bench in what would be his final NBA season.[2]

NBDL and overseas career (2001–2006)[edit]

Burrell signed with National Basketball Development League (NBDL, now NBA G League) team Fayetteville Patriots on March 8, 2002.[11] In six games with five starts, Burrell averaged 5.5 points and 3.7 rebounds in his only NBDL season.[12]

After leaving the NBDL, Burrell finished much of his professional basketball career internationally, starting with the Shaanxi Kylins of the Chinese Basketball Association where he averaged 18.0 points and 6.2 rebounds in 2002–03.[13] In 2003–04, Burrell played for the Batang Thunder of the Philippine Basketball Association, averaging 25.1 points and 5.0 rebounds.[13]

Burrell returned to the U.S. signing with the Idaho Stampede of the Continental Basketball Association on November 30, 2004.[14] Burrell played 14 games for the Stampede, averaging 6.9 points and 3.9 rebounds.[15] In 2005, Burrell signed with Bilbao Basket of the Spanish Liga ACB, where he played eight games and averaged 5.0 points.[15][16] On January 24, 2005, Burrell signed with the Hitachi Sunrockers of the Japanese JBL Super League.[17] Burrell averaged 6.2 points in his final pro basketball season with Hitachi in 2005–06.[13]

Coaching career[edit]

In the 2006–07 season, Burrell was an assistant coach for the Colorado 14ers of the NBA D-League (now G League).[18]

On August 17, 2007, Burrell became an assistant coach for the Quinnipiac Bobcats men's basketball team at Quinnipiac University in his hometown of Hamden, Connecticut, under former UConn assistant coach Tom Moore.[18] Burrell helped Quinnipiac win the regular season Northeast Conference title and qualify for the NIT in the 2009–10 season.[19]

On July 13, 2015, Burrell was hired as head men's basketball coach at Southern Connecticut State University, a Division II school in New Haven.[20] Inheriting a 24–8 team from former head coach Mike Donnelly, Burrell led the Southern Connecticut Fighting Owls to a 22–8 (17–3 conference) record, Northeast-10 Conference Southwest Division title, and NCAA Tournament appearance in his first season; as a result of this success, Burrell earned Eastern College Athletic Conference Coach of the Year honors.[21][22] Burrell followed up with an 18–13 record and second straight NCAA Tournament under his tenure (fourth overall for the program) in 2016–17.[22][23]

As of the 2019–20 season, Burrell has a 91–56 cumulative record at Southern Connecticut .[23]

Head coaching record[edit]

Statistics overview
Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Southern Connecticut Fighting Owls (Northeast-10 Conference) (2015–present)
2015–16 Southern Connecticut 22–8 17–3 1st (Southwest)[24] NCAA Division II First Round
2016–17 Southern Connecticut 18–13 13–7 3rd (Southwest)[25] NCAA Division II Second Round
2017–18 Southern Connecticut 16–12 11–9 4th (Southwest)[26]
2018–19 Southern Connecticut 19–12 12–8 4th (Southwest)[27]
2019–20 Southern Connecticut 16–11 11–8 T–2nd (Southwest)[28] No postseason held
Southern Connecticut: 91–56 (.619) 64–35 (.646)
Total: 91–56 (.619)

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Personal life[edit]

Following the Chicago Bulls' 1998 championship, Connecticut Governor John G. Rowland issued a proclamation of October 20, 1998 as "Scott Burrell Day," after the town of Hamden presented Burrell with a "key to the city."[29] Burrell is married to SportsNet New York reporter Jeané Coakley.[30] They have two children.[31] His niece is the USA Eagles womens Rugby Union Lock Alycia Washington https://www.usa.rugby/player/alycia-washington

Career statistics[edit]

Legend
  GP Games played   GS  Games started  MPG  Minutes per game
 FG%  Field goal percentage  3P%  3-point field goal percentage  FT%  Free throw percentage
 RPG  Rebounds per game  APG  Assists per game  SPG  Steals per game
 BPG  Blocks per game  PPG  Points per game  Bold  Career high
 †  Won an NBA championship

NBA[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1993–94 Charlotte 51 16 15.0 .419 .333 .657 2.6 1.2 .7 .3 4.8
1994–95 Charlotte 65 62 31.0 .467 .409 .694 5.7 2.5 1.2 .6 11.5
1995–96 Charlotte 20 20 34.7 .447 .378 .750 4.9 2.4 1.4 .7 13.2
1996–97 Charlotte 28 2 17.2 .344 .345 .792 2.8 1.4 .5 .4 5.4
1996–97 Golden State 29 0 15.8 .379 .361 .652 2.7 1.2 .5 .3 4.9
1997–98 Chicago 80 3 13.7 .424 .354 .734 2.5 .8 .8 .5 5.2
1998–99 New Jersey 32 0 22.1 .361 .389 .810 3.7 1.4 1.3 .3 6.6
1999–2000 New Jersey 74 9 18.1 .394 .353 .780 3.5 1.0 .9 .6 6.1
2000–01 Charlotte 4 0 10.3 .467 .333 .250 .8 .3 .8 .0 4.3
Career 383 122 19.8 .418 .373 .723 3.5 1.4 .9 .5 6.9

Playoffs[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1998 Chicago 21 0 12.4 .438 .300 .909 2.0 .5 .9 .1 3.8
2001 Charlotte 2 0 6.0 .667 0 .500 1.5 .5 1.0 .0 2.5
Career 23 0 11.9 .447 .286 .846 2.0 .5 .9 .1 3.7

College[edit]

Year Team GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1989–90 Connecticut 32 20 25.8 .386 .313 .623 5.5 1.8 1.9 .9 8.2
1990–91 Connecticut 31 34.7 .440 .343 .592 7.5 3.1 3.6 1.3 12.7
1991–92 Connecticut 30 30 35.3 .453 .396 .611 6.1 2.9 2.5 1.0 16.3
1992–93 Connecticut 26 33.1 .411 .345 .760 6.0 2.1 2.4 1.1 16.1
Career 119 50+ 32.1 .426 .357 .640 6.3 2.5 2.6 1.1 13.1

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Scott Burrell". basketball-reference.com. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Scott Burrell Bio". NBA. Archived from the original on April 9, 2002. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  3. ^ Yantz, Tom (February 19, 1993). "Burrell: Not easy, but it will pay off". Hartford Courant. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  4. ^ a b c "Scott Burrell". baseball-reference.com. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  5. ^ "An Interview With Scott Burrell". A Dime Back. May 7, 2013. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  6. ^ Amore, Dom (March 21, 2015). "Looking Back At The Dream Season: Burrell Made Best Pass Ever". Harford Courant. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  7. ^ Keating, Christopher (July 17, 2015). "Scott Burrell Says Tate George Conviction is "Sad Situation". Hartford Courant. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  8. ^ Solomon, Dave (May 7, 2010). "Better late than never: Hamden sports legend Burrell earns UConn diploma". New Haven Register. Archived from the original on July 15, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  9. ^ a b Schanowski, Mark (April 23, 2020). "Scott Burrell one of many Bulls role players to shine during dynasty". NBC Sports Chicago. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  10. ^ Fagan, Ryan (May 10, 2020). "'The Last Dance' shines spotlight on Scott Burrell, whose athletic career is much better than you might remember". The Sporting News. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  11. ^ "Scott Burrell". NBDL. Archived from the original on June 1, 2002. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  12. ^ "Scott Burrell G-League Stats". basketball-reference. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  13. ^ a b c "Scott Burrell; de la gloria del anillo al limbo". Piratas del Basket (in Spanish). April 13, 2011. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  14. ^ "NBA veteran joins Stampede". Idaho Stampede. November 30, 2004. Retrieved June 4, 2020 – via Our Sports Central.
  15. ^ a b "Scott Burrell, Basketball Player". Proballers.
  16. ^ Ortiz Pérez, Javier (January 6, 2015). "Scott Burrell: Un anillo en Bilbao". Endesa Basket Lover. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  17. ^ "NBA Forward Burrell Joins Japan League". Xinhua News Agency. January 24, 2005. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  18. ^ a b "Scott Burrell Named Assistant Men's Basketball Coach". Quinnipiac University. August 17, 2007. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  19. ^ https://www.sports-reference.com/cbb/schools/quinnipiac/2010-schedule.html
  20. ^ Malafronte, Chip. "Hometown hero Scott Burrell right choice for Southern Connecticut job". New Haven Register. Archived from the original on September 5, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  21. ^ "NCAA Statistics". stats.ncaa.org.
  22. ^ a b "Scott Burrell". SCSUOwls.com. Southern Connecticut State University. Retrieved June 4, 2020.
  23. ^ a b "NCAA Statistics". stats.ncaa.org.
  24. ^ "Northeast 10". Northeast 10.
  25. ^ "2016-17 Men's Basketball Standings". Northeast 10.
  26. ^ "2016-17 Men's Basketball Standings". Northeast 10.
  27. ^ "2018-19 Men's Basketball Standings". Northeast 10.
  28. ^ "2019-20 Men's Basketball Standings". Northeast 10.
  29. ^ "Newspaper wars hit the airwaves". Sports Business Journal. October 26, 1998. Retrieved June 5, 2020.
  30. ^ "SNY reporter Jeane Coakley is Paul Smith's graduation speaker". Press-Republican.
  31. ^ "The Myth. | Jeané Coakley | Sports Reporter | Anchor | Host". www.jeanecoakley.com.

External links[edit]