Scott County, Iowa

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Scott County
Scott County Courthouse
Official seal of Scott County
Map of Iowa highlighting Scott County
Location within the U.S. state of Iowa
Map of the United States highlighting Iowa
Iowa's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 41°38′09″N 90°38′02″W / 41.635833333333°N 90.633888888889°W / 41.635833333333; -90.633888888889
Country United States
State Iowa
Founded1837
Named forWinfield Scott
SeatDavenport
Largest cityDavenport
Area
 • Total468 sq mi (1,210 km2)
 • Land458 sq mi (1,190 km2)
 • Water10 sq mi (30 km2)  2.2%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total174,669
 • Density370/sq mi (140/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district2nd
Websitewww.scottcountyiowa.gov

Scott County is a county located in the U.S. state of Iowa. As of the 2020 census, the population was 174,669,[1] making it the third-most populous county in Iowa. The county seat is Davenport.

Scott County is included in the Davenport–Moline-Rock Island, IA–IL Metropolitan Statistical Area.[2]

History[edit]

The newly redesigned courthouse entrance

The first American settlement in the area now known as Scott County was Clark's Ferry or Clark's Landing (now Buffalo) in 1833. Other early towns included Davenport (now the county seat and largest city) and the town of Rockingham (which ceased to exist in 1847). The area was fully surveyed in 1837, and the county was established by the Wisconsin territorial legislature in that same year. Scott County is named for General Winfield Scott,[3] who was the presiding officer at the signing of the peace treaty ending the Black Hawk War.

By 1900 the population of the county was 51,500, and by 1950 it was over 100,000. Scott County now comprises part of the Quad City region, which includes the cities of Davenport and Bettendorf (in Iowa) and Rock Island, Moline and East Moline (in Illinois).

The present Scott County Courthouse was completed in 1955 and expanded along with the jail in 2007.[4][5] The old section of the Scott County Jail was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.[6] The courthouse was included as a contributing property in the Davenport Downtown Commercial Historic District in 2020.[7]

Geography[edit]

The county seat is the city of Davenport.[8] According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 468 square miles (1,210 km2), of which 458 square miles (1,190 km2) is land and 10 square miles (26 km2) (2.2%) is water.[9] Part of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge is located within the county.

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18505,986
186025,959333.7%
187038,59948.7%
188041,2666.9%
189043,1644.6%
190051,55819.4%
191060,00016.4%
192073,95223.3%
193077,3324.6%
194084,7489.6%
1950100,69818.8%
1960119,06718.2%
1970142,68719.8%
1980160,02212.1%
1990150,973−5.7%
2000158,6685.1%
2010165,2244.1%
2020174,6695.7%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790-1960[11] 1900-1990[12]
1990-2000[13] 2010-2019[14]
Population of Scott County from US census data

The US Census Bureau estimated Scott County's population at 170,385 in 2013, fourth fastest-growing out of Iowa's 99 counties after Dallas County, a western suburb of Des Moines: Johnson, Polk, followed by Warren County being the top five.[15]

2020 census[edit]

The 2020 census recorded a population of 174,669 in the county, with a population density of 373.8768/sq mi (144.3547/km2). 92.61% of the population reported being of one race. 72.51% were non-Hispanic White, 8.08% were Black, 6.92% were Hispanic, 0.33% were Native American, 2.78% were Asian, 0.03% were Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander and 9.33% were some other race or more than one race. There were 77,771 housing units, of which 71,628 were occupied.[1]

2010 census[edit]

The 2010 census recorded a population of 165,224 in the county, with a population density of 360.806/sq mi (139.3081/km2). There were 71,835 housing units, of which 66,765 were occupied.[16]

2000 census[edit]

2000 Census Age Pyramid for Scott County

At the 2000 census there were 158,668 people, 62,334 households, and 41,888 families in the county. The population density was 346 people per square mile (134/km2). There were 65,649 housing units at an average density of 143 per square mile (55/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 88.54% White, 6.11% Black or African American, 0.32% Native American, 1.58% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.64% from other races, and 1.80% from two or more races. 4.06%.[17] were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 62,334 households 33.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.30% were married couples living together, 11.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.80% were non-families. 26.90% of households were one person and 9.00% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.04.

The age distribution was 26.50% under the age of 18, 9.30% from 18 to 24, 29.40% from 25 to 44, 23.00% from 45 to 64, and 11.80% 65 or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.50 males.

The median household income was $42,701 and the median family income was $52,045. Males had a median income of $38,985 versus $25,456 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,310. About 7.70% of families and 10.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.70% of those under age 18 and 5.80% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Scott County Administration Building

Cities[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Other unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Former township[edit]

Population ranking[edit]

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2020 census of Scott County.[1]

county seat

Rank City/town/etc. Municipal type Population (2020 Census)
1 Davenport City 101,724
2 Bettendorf City 39,102
3 Eldridge City 6,726
4 Le Claire City 4,710
5 Park View CDP 2,709
6 Durant (partially in Cedar and Muscatine counties) City 1,871
7 Blue Grass (partially in Muscatine County) City 1,666
8 Walcott (partially in Muscatine County) City 1,551
9 Buffalo City 1,176
10 Princeton City 923
11 Long Grove City 838
12 Riverdale City 379
13 Donahue City 335
14 McCausland City 313
15 Dixon City 202
16 Maysville City 156
17 Panorama Park City 139
18 New Liberty City 138

Politics[edit]

For most of its history, Scott County was primarily a Republican county. From 1880 to 1984, it only supported a Democrat for president nine times, six of which were national Democratic landslides. In more recent elections, the county has become consistently Democratic in presidential elections like many other midsize urban counties nationwide, with the party's candidates winning the county in every presidential election from 1988 on. However, their margins of victory have not been as wide as in many other counties of similar composition, especially in 2016 when Hillary Clinton only won the county by 1,291 votes.

United States presidential election results for Scott County, Iowa[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 43,683 47.17% 46,926 50.68% 1,990 2.15%
2016 39,149 45.41% 40,440 46.90% 6,631 7.69%
2012 38,251 42.38% 50,652 56.12% 1,360 1.51%
2008 36,365 42.10% 48,927 56.64% 1,086 1.26%
2004 39,958 48.30% 42,122 50.92% 642 0.78%
2000 32,801 46.48% 35,857 50.81% 1,910 2.71%
1996 26,751 41.03% 32,694 50.14% 5,757 8.83%
1992 28,844 38.63% 33,765 45.22% 12,053 16.14%
1988 31,025 46.98% 34,415 52.12% 595 0.90%
1984 38,034 53.41% 32,550 45.71% 628 0.88%
1980 34,701 51.09% 26,391 38.85% 6,834 10.06%
1976 35,021 53.11% 29,771 45.15% 1,148 1.74%
1972 34,135 57.41% 23,810 40.05% 1,510 2.54%
1968 25,783 46.86% 24,596 44.71% 4,639 8.43%
1964 19,488 38.14% 31,526 61.70% 84 0.16%
1960 27,617 54.50% 23,004 45.40% 50 0.10%
1956 27,965 59.37% 18,969 40.27% 170 0.36%
1952 29,719 61.88% 17,807 37.08% 500 1.04%
1948 16,842 49.42% 16,661 48.89% 578 1.70%
1944 18,015 48.58% 18,962 51.14% 104 0.28%
1940 18,504 46.69% 20,996 52.98% 130 0.33%
1936 12,691 37.17% 20,737 60.73% 717 2.10%
1932 14,218 43.81% 16,887 52.03% 1,350 4.16%
1928 16,974 56.47% 12,942 43.06% 142 0.47%
1924 18,360 60.32% 4,347 14.28% 7,731 25.40%
1920 16,233 58.75% 5,473 19.81% 5,925 21.44%
1916 8,329 56.39% 5,212 35.29% 1,229 8.32%
1912 1,568 11.46% 5,632 41.17% 6,479 47.36%
1908 6,845 50.75% 5,845 43.33% 799 5.92%
1904 6,789 51.96% 4,931 37.74% 1,346 10.30%
1900 6,327 52.05% 5,157 42.43% 671 5.52%
1896 6,419 58.73% 4,032 36.89% 479 4.38%
1892 2,999 32.15% 6,205 66.52% 124 1.33%
1888 2,832 32.82% 5,692 65.97% 104 1.21%
1884 2,740 34.31% 5,200 65.11% 47 0.59%
1880 4,322 61.04% 2,594 36.63% 165 2.33%


Education[edit]

Public school districts in Scott County include:

Higher education institutions[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "2020 Census State Redistricting Data". census.gov. United states Census Bureau. Retrieved August 12, 2021.
  2. ^ United States Office of Management and Budget. "Update of Statistical Area Definitions and Guidance on Their Uses" (PDF). pp. 5, 36. Archived from the original (PDF) on May 14, 2006. Retrieved July 21, 2006.
  3. ^ "Scott County History". scottcountyiowa.com. June 3, 2015. Retrieved April 6, 2018.
  4. ^ "Scott County Courthouse". Iowa Judicial Branch. Archived from the original on July 26, 2011. Retrieved February 10, 2011.
  5. ^ Allemeier, Scott. "Scott County opens new jail to the public". Quad-City Times (November 16, 2007). Retrieved February 10, 2011.
  6. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. March 13, 2009.
  7. ^ Jennifer Irsfeld James. "National Register of Historic Places Nomination Form: Davenport Downtown Commercial Historic District" (PDF). Downtown Davenport, Iowa. Retrieved September 25, 2020.
  8. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 20, 2014.
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved July 20, 2014.
  12. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 20, 2014.
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 20, 2014.
  14. ^ "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on August 27, 2011. Retrieved July 20, 2014.
  15. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division. March 2014. Retrieved April 2, 2014.
  16. ^ "Population & Housing Occupancy Status 2010". United States Census Bureau American FactFinder. Retrieved June 2, 2011.[dead link]
  17. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 6, 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°38′09″N 90°38′02″W / 41.63583°N 90.63389°W / 41.63583; -90.63389