Scott Fielding

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The Honourable
Scott Fielding
MLA
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba for Kirkfield Park
Assumed office
April 19, 2016
Preceded by Sharon Blady
Winnipeg City Councillor
In office
2006–2014
Preceded by Jae Eadie
Succeeded by Scott Gillingham
Constituency St. James-Brooklands
Personal details
Born 1971/1972 (age 46–47)[1]
Political party Progressive Conservative

Scott Fielding is a Canadian politician. A city councillor in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada from 2006 to 2014, he was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Manitoba in the 2016 provincial election.

Education[edit]

Fielding received a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science and economics from the University of Manitoba.[2]

Work and community involvement[edit]

He held several positions within the government of Manitoba. He was the fundraising chair for the Bourkevale Community Club as well as being appointed by Mayor Sam Katz to the board of the Winnipeg Convention Centre. In 2008, he was appointed to the board of directors of Assiniboine Park Conservance, where he continues to serve. He worked as a pharmaceutical sales representative and is part owner of Tiber River Naturals in Winnipeg.[3]

Political career[edit]

In the 1995 provincial election, he ran against Liberal MLA Kevin Lamoureux as a member of the Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba. He was defeated.[3]

He was first elected in October 2006 when he ran in municipal politics. Since then, he represented the St James-Brooklands ward in the City of Winnipeg. In his first election, he defeated longtime incumbent Jae Eadie, scoring 48% of the vote in his ward in a four-way race.[4]

He sat on the Property & Planning Committee of City Council and recently served as chair for the City of Winnipeg's Economic Opportunity Commission. The commission looked at ways to reduce wasteful spending and proposed ideas on how to eliminate the business tax.

In the spring of 2012, he considered running for the leadership of the Progressive Conservative Party of Manitoba.[5] Citing family reasons, Fielding chose not to run.[6]

In May 2014, Fielding announced that would not seek re-election in the 2014 municipal election.[7] A month later, he announced he was seeking the Progressive Conservative nomination in Kirkfield Park for the 2016 provincial election.[8] He won the nomination by acclamation in September 2014.[9] On 19 April 2016, Fielding defeated New Democrat incumbent Sharon Blady to win the seat.[10]

On 3 May 2016, Fielding was appointed to the Executive Council of Manitoba as Minister of Families.[11][12]

Personal[edit]

Fielding is married, and the father of two daughters and a son.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.winnipegfreepress.com/our-communities/metro/Kirkfield-Park-candidates-375296911.html
  2. ^ a b "Meet Scott". Scott Fielding. Archived from the original on 28 August 2011. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Former PC candidate to seek Eadie's job". Winnipeg Free Press. 20 March 2006. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  4. ^ "26-year era comes to an end". Winnipeg Free Press. 26 October 2006. Retrieved 11 September 2011. 
  5. ^ "Scott Fielding ponders Tory leadership bid". CBC News. 23 March 2012. Retrieved 20 May 2016. 
  6. ^ "Fielding not running for PC leadership". Metro. Winnipeg. 19 April 2012. Retrieved 20 May 2016. 
  7. ^ "Coun. Fielding won't run for Winnipeg mayor". CBC News. 21 May 2014. Retrieved 20 May 2016. 
  8. ^ "Winnipeg councillor Scott Fielding seeks provincial PC nod". CBC News. 10 June 2014. Retrieved 20 May 2016. 
  9. ^ "Scott Fielding acclaimed, running for PCs in Kirkfield Park". Metro. Winnipeg. 17 September 2014. Retrieved 20 May 2016. 
  10. ^ "Tory wins turn the city blue". Winnipeg Free Press. 19 April 2016. Retrieved 20 May 2016. 
  11. ^ "Brian Pallister sworn in as Manitoba premier". CBC News. 3 May 2016. Retrieved 20 May 2016. 
  12. ^ "Meet Manitoba's new government cabinet members". CBC News. 3 May 2016. Retrieved 20 May 2016.