Scott Secules

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Scott Secules
No. 9, 10
Position: Quarterback
Personal information
Date of birth: (1964-11-08) November 8, 1964 (age 52)
Place of birth: Newport News, Virginia
Height: 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight: 220 lb (100 kg)
Career information
High school: Chantilly (VA)
College: Virginia
NFL Draft: 1988 / Round: 6 / Pick: 151
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
TD-INT: 4-14
Passing yards: 1,311
Rating: 50.9
Player stats at NFL.com
Player stats at PFR

Thomas Wescott "Scott" Secules (born November 8, 1964) is a former professional American football quarterback who played in the National Football League (NFL) for the Dallas Cowboys, Miami Dolphins and the New England Patriots. He played college football at the University of Virginia.

Early years[edit]

Secules attended Chantilly High School, before moving on to the University of Virginia. After redshirting as a freshman, he became the backup quarterback behind Don Majkowski. The next year he started one game against North Carolina University, in place of a suspended Majkowski (for breaking team rules).[1][2]

As a junior in 1986, Secules started 2 games with Majkowski out with an injured shoulder, he won both contests and received ACC offensive player of the week honors for his play against Wake Forest University.[3]

Secules was named the starter in his final year and although the team began the season 3–4, it won 5 straight games to finish with an 8–4 record. He also led one of the greatest comebacks in school history, with a 17-7 deficit against North Carolina University in the final 4:44 minutes of the game, Secules passed for 2 touchdowns, en route to a 20-17 win.[4] He received All-ACC honors, while helping the school achieve its first home undefeated season since 1951 and reach its second bowl game in history, where they defeated Brigham Young University 22-16 in the All-American Bowl, with Secules being named the game's Most Valuable Player.[5]

He finished his college career with 14 school records, that included single-season passing yards (2,311), single-game passing yards (328), 200-yard games (10) and most wins by a first-time starting quarterback (8).[6] He suffered a serious right eye injury during a fight, that happened in the spring prior to the NFL draft, forcing him to have immediate surgery to repair the tear duct.[7]

Professional career[edit]

Dallas Cowboys[edit]

Secules was selected by the Dallas Cowboys in the sixth round (151st overall) of the 1988 NFL Draft. Head coach Tom Landry saw potential in his training camp performances and made the uncommon move of keeping 4 quarterbacks at the start of the regular season.[8] After Danny White was lost for the year in the third game, Secules became the third-string quarterback but was declared inactive in all 16 games. At the end of the season, the team also protected him in Plan B free agency.

In 1989, new head coach Jimmy Johnson brought in a new coaching staff and drafted two rookie quarterbacks (Troy Aikman and Steve Walsh),[9] so he was traded to the Miami Dolphins in exchange for a fifth round draft choice (#120-James Gray) on August 6.[10]

Miami Dolphins[edit]

In 1989, the Miami Dolphins acquired Secules because they wanted to develop a young quarterback behind Dan Marino. In 1992, he was passed on the depth chart by Scott Mitchell and was eventually placed on the injured reserve list with a shoulder injury.[11] He only threw 70 passes in three season and saw action mostly as a holder, having only one meaningful appearance during his time in Miami, where he threw 2 interceptions when Marino got hurt in a 1989 loss against the Pittsburgh Steelers.[12]

New England Patriots[edit]

On March 22, 1993, he was signed as a free agent by the New England Patriots.[13] He was the backup to rookie Drew Bledsoe and became the starter in the fifth game of the season against the Phoenix Cardinals, helping the team to its first win.[14] He would lose his next 3 starts and in the ninth game while playing against the Buffalo Bills, he suffered a separated left shoulder and was replaced by a healthy Bledsoe.[15] He was released on April 21, 1994.[16]

He finished his career with 108 completions in 204 attempts, 1,311 passing yards, 4 touchdowns and 14 interceptions in 57 games.[17]

Personal life[edit]

ESPN broadcaster Chris Berman once nicknamed him Scott "Won't You Let Me Take You on a" Secules;[18] the nickname was a play on the lyrics of the song "Sea Cruise" by Frankie Ford.

Secules worked as the Senior Associate Athletic Director for External Affairs at Virginia Commonwealth University from November 2006 until October 2009. He currently serves as the Executive Director of The First Tee of Greater Dallas.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Secules responds to challenge". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  2. ^ "Secules". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Secules honored". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  4. ^ "Virginia derails Carolina". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  5. ^ "Virginia is Unbeaten in Postseason Play". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  6. ^ "Secules eager to compete for quarterback job". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  7. ^ "Secules injures eye in scuffle". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  8. ^ "Secules making a good first impression". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  9. ^ "Cowboys Ship Secules shooting for starting job". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Cowboys Ship Secules Off to Dolphins". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  11. ^ "Mecklenburg at home; Dolphins lose Secules". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Secules Signs With Patriots Dolphins May Get Wideout Fryar For Two Draft Picks". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Patriots get Dolphins' backup quarterback Scott Secules". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  14. ^ "Secules gets front-row seat". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  15. ^ "Meanwhile, Secules licks his wounds". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  16. ^ "Transactions". Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  17. ^ "Scott Secules Stats". ESPN. Retrieved February 21, 2016. 
  18. ^ Latham, Bob (January 2013). "Meet Johnny Football" (PDF). Sports Travel. Retrieved February 7, 2015.