Scott West

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Scott West
Scott west afl player.jpg
Personal information
Date of birth (1974-11-14) 14 November 1974 (age 44)
Place of birth Swan Reach, South Australia
Original team(s) Strathmore
Debut Round 1, 1993, Footscray
vs. Collingwood, at Melbourne Cricket Ground
Height 178 cm (5 ft 10 in)
Weight 80 kg (176 lb)
Playing career1
Years Club Games (Goals)
1993–2008 Western Bulldogs 324 (104)
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 2008.
Career highlights
Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Scott West (born 14 November 1974) is a former Australian rules footballer who represented the Western Bulldogs in the Australian Football League (AFL). Having won a club-record seven Charlie Sutton Medals, West is recognised as one of the Bulldogs' greatest-ever players. A tough "in-and-under" midfielder who was hard at the ball, especially around the stoppages, West was regularly among the league's most prolific ballwinners during his playing career.

Early career[edit]

One of three brothers, West grew up in the northwestern Melbourne suburb of Keilor a keen Essendon supporter. Ironically, his childhood neighbour and future Essendon footballer Rick Olarenshaw was a Footscray supporter.[1] His older brother Troy initially trained at Essendon until told the West family residence actually belonged to Footscray's recruiting zone.[1] Troy would go on to have a fine career with Williamstown Football Club. The third brother, Brent, is Scott's twin.[1]

West was educated at Penleigh and Essendon Grammar School (PEGS), whom he represented in football with the Associated Grammar Schools of Victoria (AGSV) First XVIII in 1991 and 1992 along with Shane Crawford and future teammate Paul Dimattina.[2] He also played for Strathmore and was subsequently recruited by Footscray (now Western Bulldogs), making his senior debut in 1993. He won an AFL Rising Star nomination that season. In 1993 and 1994 he wore the number 14 guernsey, before changing to his famous number 7 in the wake of Doug Hawkins' departure to Fitzroy in 1995.

AFL career[edit]

After Footscray rebranded itself the Western Bulldogs during the tumultuous 1996 season, the Bulldogs rebounded dramatically in 1997, falling agonizingly short of their first Grand Final appearance since 1961 when the eventual premiers Adelaide came from behind to win the Preliminary Final by two points. West's contribution in the club's amazing turnaround was recognized when he won the second of what would be seven Charlie Sutton Medals. He made All-Australian selection on five occasions - in 1998, 2000, 2004, 2005 and 2006. West's best and fairest victory in 2005 saw him overtake Gary Dempsey's previous record of six.

Late in 2006 West had been described as being in the best form of his career despite him being 32 years of age and completing his 300th game. This run of form included an incredible career best 45 disposals in one match against the Adelaide Crows. In the 2006 season, West became the first player on record (recorded since 1987) to amass more than 400 handpasses in a season, finishing with 423.

West finished runner-up in the Brownlow Medal count twice: in 2000 and in 2006. He also finished third in the 1999 count, making him one of the best footballers never to have won the AFL's most prestigious individual honour. In 2000 he was particularly unlucky: going into the final round, he was level with Shane Woewodin from Melbourne on 22 votes. Having had only 17 disposals and being interchanged for majority of the final quarter, Woewodin wasn't considered a chance to poll against West Coast, however Woewodin polled 2 votes and consequently Won the medal on 24 votes. Wests amazing brownlow record consists of third in 1999, second (by two votes) in 2000 and (by two votes) in 2006 and fourth in 2004 and 2005. In 2006 he won the Sunday Footy Show's Lou Richards award for best player as voted by Channel 9's football commentators. He was the crowd favourite to win the Brownlow Medal in 2006, due to his string of close misses and secondly, because he was one of the few Victoria-based players with a high chance of winning the award, during a period when non-Victorian teams were dominating the league. West ended up finishing second in 2006 behind Adam Goodes.

On 23 September 2008, his career came to an end after the Bulldogs said he was no longer required at the club.[3]

Post-playing career[edit]

West is a qualified landscape gardener and has run a landscaping business since 1997.

From 2009 to 2011, West served as a midfield coach at Melbourne, earning praise for his teaching ability.[4]

In 2012 he became the coach of the Werribee Football Club in the Victorian Football League (VFL). His stint was short but reasonably successful, leading Werribee to consecutive Preliminary Finals before quitting after the 2013 season in the hope of landing a coaching role in the AFL.[5]

In October 2014, West was among the candidates considered to replace Brendan McCartney as senior coach of the Bulldogs,[4] but the position eventually was given to Luke Beveridge.

West has also been working as a football commentator on radio for the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC).[6]

Honours[edit]

In early 2002, West was named in the Western Bulldogs Team of the Century.

The Scott West Award, awarded to the Western Bulldogs' most courageous player during a season, was named in his honour.

In 2013 West was inducted into the Australian Football Hall of Fame.[1]

In March 2017, West was chosen as one of the club icons to unfurl the Bulldogs' premiership flag.[7]

Career Statistics[edit]

Legend
 G  Goals  B  Behinds  K  Kicks  H  Handballs  D  Disposals  M  Marks  T  Tackles
Led the league after finals only
Led the league after season and finals
Season Team No. Games G B K H D M T G B K H D M T
Totals Averages (per game)
1993 Footscray 14 17 21 15 170 119 289 36 35 1.2 0.9 10.0 7.0 17.0 2.1 2.1
1994 Footscray 14 23 9 11 338 155 493 51 38 0.4 0.5 14.7 6.7 21.4 2.2 1.7
1995 Footscray 7 23 6 13 365 182 547 46 45 0.3 0.6 15.9 7.9 23.8 2.0 2.0
1996 Footscray 7 15 0 4 137 128 265 21 23 0.0 0.3 9.1 8.5 17.7 1.4 1.5
1997 Western Bulldogs 7 24 5 3 367 240 607 58 57 0.2 0.1 15.3 10.0 25.3 2.4 2.4
1998 Western Bulldogs 7 24 5 3 309 301 610 40 67 0.2 0.1 12.9 12.5 25.4 1.7 2.8
1999 Western Bulldogs 7 21 11 5 244 268 512 47 40 0.5 0.2 11.6 12.8 24.4 2.2 1.9
2000 Western Bulldogs 7 23 7 5 331 326 657 80 51 0.3 0.2 14.4 14.2 28.6 3.5 2.2
2001 Western Bulldogs 7 22 11 4 283 298 581 72 59 0.5 0.2 12.9 13.5 26.4 3.3 2.7
2002 Western Bulldogs 7 18 8 8 222 249 471 61 57 0.4 0.4 12.3 13.8 26.2 3.4 3.2
2003 Western Bulldogs 7 22 3 6 277 343 620 107 67 0.1 0.3 12.6 15.6 28.2 4.9 3.0
2004 Western Bulldogs 7 22 7 10 278 314 592 104 80 0.3 0.5 12.6 14.3 26.9 4.7 3.6
2005 Western Bulldogs 7 22 4 7 267 370 637 91 61 0.2 0.3 12.1 16.8 29.0 4.1 2.8
2006 Western Bulldogs 7 24 6 5 285 423 708 119 77 0.3 0.2 11.9 17.6 29.5 5.0 3.2
2007 Western Bulldogs 7 20 1 6 211 329 540 110 82 0.1 0.3 10.6 16.5 27.0 5.5 4.1
2008 Western Bulldogs 7 4 0 0 45 48 93 14 14 0.0 0.0 11.3 12.0 23.3 3.5 3.5
Career 324 104 105 4129 4093 8222 1057 853 0.3 0.3 12.7 12.6 25.4 3.3 2.6

Other[edit]

West has made several appearances on the AFL Footy Show and appeared on a pizza ad with Melbourne's David Neitz.

West is married to Leshelle and has four sons: Rhylee (born 2000), Kobi, Cooper and Levi (born 2008).[8] Rhylee was drafted by the Western Bulldogs in 2018 as a father-son selection.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Green, Warwick (5 June 2013). "Scott West crowned an AFL Hall of Fame member". Herald Sun.
  2. ^ "Football 1981-" (PDF). AGSV Sport. Retrieved 9 August 2017.
  3. ^ "Bulldogs axe West". AFL.com.au. 23 September 2008. Retrieved 23 September 2008.
  4. ^ a b Landsberger, Sam (10 October 2014). "Scott West signals intent to pursue Western Bulldogs coaching job after Brendan McCartney resigns". Herald Sun.
  5. ^ Collins, Ben (8 October 2013). "Scott West quits Werribee in hope of AFL gig". AFL.com.au.
  6. ^ http://www.afl.com.au/tv-radio/domestic-broadcast-partners/radio-and-print
  7. ^ "Bulldogs Icons - Scott West". westernbulldogs.com.au. 30 March 2017.
  8. ^ Stevens, Mark (14 August 2008). "Scott West welcomes fourth son into the world". Herald Sun.
  9. ^ "AFL Draft Pick 26: Rhylee West". westernbulldogs.com.au. 23 November 2018.

External links[edit]