Scout Schultz

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Shooting of Scout Schultz
DateSeptember 16, 2017 (2017-09-16)
Location532 8th Street NW, Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.
Participants4 Georgia Tech Police Department officers, including Tyler Beck
DeathsScout Schultz

Scout Schultz was born in Rockville, Maryland, in 1995.[1] On September 16, 2017, as a 21-year-old student at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Schultz was shot once in the heart and killed by Tyler Beck, an officer of the Georgia Tech Police Department. Schultz was carrying a type of multitool which includes a small knife. The incident was followed by protests and civil unrest, which led to multiple arrests. As of September 2018,[2] the shooting was still being investigated by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.

Early life[edit]

Scout Schultz was born in Rockville, Maryland in 1995.[1][3][4] Schultz was born with hypospadias, which can be associated with being intersex.[1] The Schultz family later moved to Lilburn, Georgia.[3][5] Schultz was a fourth year computer engineering major at Georgia Institute of Technology,[3][6] and expected to graduate a semester early according to their father.[4] Schultz was "bisexual, nonbinary and intersex" and used singular they pronouns.[7] Schultz was the president of Pride Alliance on campus.[6][5]

Schultz, who suffered from clinical depression, had spent time in counseling after attempting suicide by hanging in 2015.[8]

Shooting[edit]

On September 16, 2017, as a 21-year-old student at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Schultz was shot dead by Tyler Beck, an officer of the Georgia Tech Police Department. Schultz was carrying a type of multitool which includes a small knife. The incident was followed by protests and civil unrest, which led to multiple arrests. The shooting is being investigated by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.

The shooting occurred late on Saturday, September 16, 2017 at 532 8th Street NW on the campus of Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia.[9]

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation reported that a 9-1-1 was received around 11:17 p.m. for "a person with a knife and a gun"[9] and that Schultz was the one who called 911.[10] However, Schultz had no gun, but may have been carrying a type of multitool which includes a small knife, which may or may not have been extended. The GBI's investigation of the event is still ongoing.[8] Schultz reportedly called in that a white male was carrying a weapon, and appeared to be intoxicated.[10]

Four police officers approached Schultz.[11] Schultz refused to drop the multitool and continued to walk towards the police while shouting, "Shoot me!".[3] Schultz was shot and shortly after, pronounced dead at the Grady Memorial Hospital.[9]

On September 19, 2017, the police officer who shot Schultz was identified as Tyler Beck.[11] According to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, "Beck was certified by the Georgia Peace Officer and Standards Training Council (POST) but had not undergone Crisis Intervention Training, which trains police on how to handle mentally ill suspects."[11] Shortly after the shooting, Beck was put on paid leave.[12]

Aftermath and reactions[edit]

Schultz's family attorney, Chris Stewart, said the police overreacted.[6] Stewart claimed that this was not a "suicide by cop."[8] He added, "The area was secured. There was no one around at risk."[7]

Schultz's mother, Lynne Schultz, suggested the police should have used "pepper spray or Tasers" instead of gunning them down.[8] According to a spokesman, Georgia Tech police are equipped with the former but not the latter.[10]

Scout's father, William Schultz, said at a news conference, "Why did you have to shoot? That's the only question that matters right now. Why did you kill my son?"[13]

G. P. "Bud" Peterson, the president of Georgia Tech, said the shooting was a "heart-wrenchingly painful time" for the university.[14]

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation reported that three suicide notes were found in Schultz's dorm room.[10]

In September 2018, the investigation was still on-going; the parents announced that they had grown frustrated with the lack of criminal charges and planned to sue the university.[2] Despite Schultz not finishing senior year, Georgia Tech awarded them a diploma.[2]

Schultz's parents files a wrongful death suit naming the university, Officer Beck, and the Georgia Board of Regents in September 2019.[15]

Vigil and protest[edit]

A peaceful vigil for Schultz was held on campus on September 18.[16]

Twenty minutes later, about 50 protesters marched through campus[17] while carrying a banner which read "Protect LGBTQ" and chanting "Justice Now" and "**** the Police".[16] [18] The protest turned violent and a police car was set on fire.[19] Three people were arrested, one of them a Georgia Tech student.[12] They were charged with "inciting a riot and battery of an officer."[16]In the following weeks three more people were arrested for "misdemeanor obstruction of law enforcement."[20]On September 22 a teach in and protest occurred at Georgia Tech which led to the Student Center building being closed early at 3 p.m. [21]

Schultz's parents appealed for calm.[22]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Lieberman, Hallie (August 29, 2018). "The Trigger Effect". The Atavist Magazine (82). Retrieved August 31, 2018.
  2. ^ a b c Lauren Pozen, Family of tech student killed by campus police to sue university, Wsbtv.com, 19 September 2018
  3. ^ a b c d "Georgia student Scout Schultz shot dead by Atlanta police". BBC News. September 18, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  4. ^ a b Selk, Avi; Shapiro, T. Rees (September 18, 2017). "'We have to seek justice for Scout': Parents of student killed by police at Georgia Tech speak out". The Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  5. ^ a b Selk, Avi (September 18, 2017). "Scout Schultz: LGBT activist shot dead by police at Georgia university". The Independent. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  6. ^ a b c "Georgia Tech Student With Knife Killed by Campus Police". The New York Times. September 18, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  7. ^ a b "Georgia Tech police shoot LGBTQ student dead". The Guardian. September 18, 2017. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  8. ^ a b c d Boone, Christian (September 17, 2017). "AJC Exclusive: Mom of Georgia Tech student shot by police speaks out". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  9. ^ a b c "GBI Investigates Officer Involved Shooting in Atlanta, GA". Georgia Bureau of Investigation. Retrieved September 18, 2017. September 17, 2017
  10. ^ a b c d Brumback, Kate (September 18, 2017). "911 call about suspicious man was made by Georgia Tech student killed by police, officials say". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  11. ^ a b c Boone, Christian (September 19, 2017). "BREAKING: Listen to the 911 call in Georgia Tech shooting". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  12. ^ a b Bauer-Wolf, Jeremy (September 21, 2017). "Campus Roiled After Fatal Shooting". Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved September 21, 2017.
  13. ^ ""Family seeks answers after Georgia Tech student killed by police"". Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  14. ^ Gaffey, Conor (September 18, 2017). "SCOUT SCHULTZ: WHY DID GEORGIA POLICE SHOOT DEAD GEORGIA TECH LGBT STUDENT LEADER?". Newsweek. Retrieved September 18, 2017.
  15. ^ Gawronski, Quinn. "Parents of Georgia Tech student shot dead by campus police file suit".
  16. ^ a b c Simon, Darran (September 19, 2017). "Violence flares after quiet vigil for Georgia Tech student shot by police". CNN. Retrieved September 21, 2017.
  17. ^ "Protests after police shoot LGBT student". BBC News. September 19, 2017. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  18. ^ "Gatech Reddit forum video".
  19. ^ Grinberg, Emanuella (September 19, 2017). "Protests erupt on Georgia Tech campus after student is killed". CNN. Retrieved September 19, 2017.
  20. ^ "Georgia Tech Continues Misdemeanor Arrests Weeks After Fiery Protest | 90.1 FM WABE". 90.1 FM WABE. October 5, 2017. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  21. ^ "As Campus Cheers On Ga. Tech Police, Some Struggle To Grieve | 90.1 FM WABE". 90.1 FM WABE. September 25, 2017. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
  22. ^ "BREAKING: Vigil at Georgia Tech turns violent in aftermath of police shooting". ajc.com. Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved September 18, 2017.