University of Scranton

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University of Scranton
University of Scranton seal.png
Latin: Universitas Scrantonensis
Former names
St. Thomas College (1888–1938)
Motto Religio Mores Cultura (Latin)
Motto in English
Religion Morals Culture
Type Private Nonprofit
Research Coeducational
Established 1888
Affiliation AJCU ACCU
NAICU CIC
Religious affiliation
Roman Catholic (Jesuit)
Endowment US $170 million
President Rev. Herbert B. Keller, S.J.
Academic staff
304
Students 5,422
Undergraduates 3,910
Postgraduates 1,512
Location Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA
Campus Urban, 58 acres (23.5 ha)
Fight song "Great Battling Royals"
Colors Purple      and      White
Athletics NCAA Division III - LC
Nickname Royals / Lady Royals
Sports 19 varsity sports teams[1]
(9 men's and 10 women's)
Mascot Iggy the Royal Wolf
Website www.scranton.edu
University of Scranton logo.png

The University of Scranton is a private, non-profit, co-educational, Catholic and Jesuit research university, located in the historic Hill Section of Scranton, Pennsylvania, United States. It was founded in 1888 by Most Rev. William O'Hara, the first Bishop of Scranton, as St. Thomas College.[2] In 1938, the College was elevated to university status and took the name The University of Scranton.[3] The institution was operated by the Diocese of Scranton from its founding until 1897. While the Diocese of Scranton retained ownership of the University, it was administered by the Lasallian Christian Brothers from 1888 to 1942.[4] In 1942, the Society of Jesus took ownership and control of the University.[5] During the 1960s, the University became an independent institution under a lay Board of Trustees. The University of Scranton is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and is served by the Scranton Jesuit Community.

Currently, the University is composed of three Colleges: The College of Arts and Sciences, The Kania School of Management, and The Panuska College of Professional Studies, all of which contain both undergraduate and graduate programs.[6] Previously, the University had a College of Graduate and Continuing Education, which has recently been folded into the colleges of the respective programs. The University offers 65 Bachelor’s Degree Programs, 29 Master’s Degree Programs, 43 Minors, and 38 Undergraduate Concentrations, as well as a Doctor of Physical Therapy Program and a Doctor of Nursing Practice Program.[6]

The University enrolls approximately 6,000 graduate and undergraduate students. Most of its students are from Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York.[6] In 2016, about 58% of its undergraduate students were women and 42% men.[7] In its graduate programs, about 62% are women students and 38% men. The University has about 300 full-time faculty members, approximately 200 of which are tenured.[6]

History[edit]

In 1888 the first bishop of Scranton, Most Rev. William O’Hara. began construction of St. Thomas College, the predecessor of the University of Scranton. In September 1892 the College admitted its first students, 62 young men. Staffing passed from diocesan priests and seminarians, to Xaverian Brothers, and after 1897 to Lasallian Christian Brothers. In 1997 the school was broken into three divisions: the college department, a two-year commercial program, and St. Thomas High School which remained open until 1939. Jesuit Fr. Daniel J. MacGoldrick came from Georgetown University to serve as president from 1895 until his death in 1900. The College awarded degrees through other colleges until 1924, when it received a State charter to grant bachelor's degrees in arts and science, and the master of science. In 1938, the Christian Brothers renamed the college "University of Scranton" and began admitting women to the evening division.[8][9][10]

The Drama Club began productions in 1893. The Aquinas began as a literary monthly in 1915, furnishing also a yearbook edition, evolving into a student newspaper in 1931, and by the 21st century adding a web edition. The current Windhover yearbook was first published in 1948 and named for the bird's loyalty to its master. The Glee Club dates to 1925. In 1931 the college band began playing at sports events and presenting a spring concert.[8]

In 1942 governance of the University of Scranton passed over to the Society of Jesuits. In 1944 Scranton Preparatory School was founded, with its first quarters in a former private hospital building; it moved to its present location in 1963 and became independent of the University in 1978.[8][11][12]

With the influx of veterans after World War II, three barracks were constructed on the former Scranton Estate and served as classroom space over the following 15 years.[10][9] After 1946 the athletic teams ceased to be the Tomcats and were called the Royals after the purple color of their uniforms. The Graduate School opened in 1950, soon adding programs in Education, Business Administration, Chemistry, History, and English; all admitted women from the start. In 1951 an Army ROTC unit was established and made obligatory for non-veterans through freshman and sophomore years.[13][8]

Decade of expansion[edit]

An expansion plan, beginning at $5,000,000, produced fifteen new buildings between 1956 and 1966, with Loyola Hall of Science in 1956 and the first residence halls for students in 1958: Casey, Fitch, Martin, and McCourt. Three years later Denis Edward, Hafey, Lynett, and Hannan residence halls were added.[14] With the death of Worthington Scranton in 1958, the University acquired the remainder of his properties.[15] Alumni Memorial Library was completed in 1960[16] and Gunster Memorial Student Center in 1961, including the 400-seat Eagen Auditorium. In 1962 the five-storey classroom building St. Thomas Hall was built, which included St. Ignatius Loyola Chapel. At this time the original Wyoming Avenue properties were completely vacated.[17][18] New construction extended to Driscoll and Nevils residence halls in 1965, raising on-campus housing to 650 male students.[14] In 1967 the first varsity athletic center was completed and named after former president Fr. John J. Long, S.J., who had led the building campaign over more than a decade.[19][20][8]

Esprit, the University's review of arts and letters, first appeared in 1958 and Flannery O'Connor, friend of a Jesuit, visited the campus to help get it launched.[8]

Changing times[edit]

After campus protests against the Vietnam War in the late 1960s, participation in the ROTC became voluntary in 1969.[21] The same year other regulations were changed: the requirement that students wear coat and tie to class was dropped,[22] students of age were allowed to drink in the dormitories,[23] and only underclassmen with failing grades were subject to a curfew.[24] After 1970 females could visit male dormitories until 10:00 P.M. on weekdays and 2:00 A.M. on weekends.[25] The common core curriculum added options after 1970.[26]

In 1966 a University Senate was established, whereby faculty and administrators, and later student representatives, could make recommendations to the Board of Trustees.[27] Until 1969 the Jesuit community exercised ownership of the University. In 1969 lay members were first admitted to a newly independent Board of Trustees.[28][29] While women had been admitted to evening school and summer classes since 1938, it was only in 1972 that they were first admitted to the College of Arts and Science. Fitch Hall, the first women's residence, opened that fall.[8]

Linden Street was closed to form the university commons in 1980 and sculptures were added to beautify the campus: Jacob and the Angel (1982), Ignatius of Loyola and fountain (1988), and Christ the Teacher (1998). The World Premiere Composition Series began performing new works by composers in 1984 and has continued this annual showcase.[30] During the 16-year presidency of Jesuit Fr. Joseph A. Panuska, S.J., two capital campaigns enabled the construction of major new buildings, including the Byron Recreational Complex (1986), Hyland classroom building (1988), Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Memorial Library (1992), and McDade Center for the Performing Arts (1993). Upon Panuska's departure, the Board of Trustees renamed in his honor the College of Health, Education, and Human Resources which he had founded in 1987.[8]

Twenty-first century[edit]

In 2000 the Kania School of Management moved to the new, five-storey hall named for John E. Brennan ‘68. The Department of Physical Therapy, founded in 1980, became in 2004 the University's only doctoral program, receiving CAPTE certification in 2007. In fall 2011, the new Loyola Science Center added 22 class and seminar rooms and 34 laboratories.[31] Pilarz and Montrone halls on Mulberry Street provided more fitness space, a dining area, and apartment-style units to accommodate 400 juniors and seniors. In 2015 Leahy Hall was dedicated to accommodate the area of physical therapy.[8]

In 1942 the University was primarily a commuter school with fewer than 1,000 students. By 2015 it had come to serve a wide region with an enrollment of approximately 5,500 students in undergraduate, graduate, and nontraditional programs. The University's strategic plan for 2015-2020 looks to build on the Jesuit heritage with education that is "engaged, integrated, global". [32]

University academics[edit]

The university grants undergraduate degrees (Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science) in 65 majors. Students may also utilize many pre-professional concentrations, such as pre-medical, pre-law, and pre-dental. The university also has an Honors Program and the SJLA (Special Jesuit Liberal Arts) Program in which select students complete courses in moral philosophy, ethics, theology, and the humanities in addition to their normal course load.

The university also grants graduate degrees (Master of Arts, Master of Science, Master of Business Administration, Master of Science in Nursing, Master of Health Administration, Master of Occupational Therapy, Master of Science in Education) in 29 fields, among them Accounting, Chemistry, Biochemistry, Computing Sciences, Counseling and Human Services, Curriculum & Instruction, Educational Administration, Elementary and Special Education, Health Administration, Human Resources, Nursing, Software Engineering, and Theology. The university also offers a Doctor of Physical Therapy program and Doctor of Nursing Practice.

Curriculum[edit]

The university offers a liberal arts program. Students are required to take the core courses in composition. Students are also required to take two theology courses, two philosophy courses, as well as an elective in one of these two areas. Filling out the general education requirements are 6 credits in science courses, 6 credits in writing intensive courses, 6 credits in cultural diversity courses, 3 credits in a mathematics course, 12 credits in humanities courses and 3 credits in physical education.

Honors programs and societies[edit]

Honors program[edit]

The honors program, first created in 1963 by Academic Vice President Fr. William Kelly, S.J., stresses independent work and individualized engagement with faculty.[3] The program gives students the opportunity to pursue their research interests through one-on-one tutorials with professors and culminating in a year-long thesis project.[33] Honors Students must take one course, between three and five tutorials, two seminars and the final 6-credit project. Honors courses count toward general education requirements and the tutorials count toward major, minor, cognate or general education requirements.[34] Students can apply to the Honors Program in the fall of their sophomore year. Because a minimum of a 3.5 GPA is required for graduation in the Honors Program, applicants must have at least a 3.3 GPA to be considered. Admission is also based on the applicant’s high school and college records, SAT scores, application, recommendations, and interviews. Normally around 50 students are accepted into the program.[34]

Business leadership[edit]

The Business Leadership program (BLDR), a honors program in the Kania School of Management (KSOM), teaches students the key components of leadership.[35] The program includes special sections of key business courses taught from the leadership perspective, leadership seminars, a mentor/internship program, and an independent leadership project.[36][37] The program culminates in the students preparing portfolios on the essence of leadership, as derived from participation in the program, and defending their concepts of leadership before a faculty board.[38] The program accepts 15 sophomores each spring to begin the two-year curriculum the following fall based upon leadership experience and/or potential, student records from high school and college, involvement in clubs and activities, recommendations from professors, and a minimum GPA of a 3.0, because students need at least a 3.5 GPA to graduate with the program.[36][39]

Special Jesuit Liberal Arts[edit]

The Special Jesuit Liberal Arts program (SJLA) was established in 1975 to model the traditional Jesuit liberal arts education that emphasizes philosophy, theology, history and literature of the Western classical and Christian ages while providing a way for students to fulfill the general education requirements.[40][41][42] Through the courses, students develop enhanced writing, oral and critical-thinking skills while also becoming immersed in a community atmosphere that encourages excellence and service to others and an awareness of contemporary issues.[43][44] Before the start of freshman year, the most qualified incoming students, usually in the top five percent of applicants, are invited to join the four year SJLA program. Students not selected initially may apply for admission as second semester freshmen or as sophomores.[45]

Academic honor societies[edit]

The University of Scranton maintains local chapters of over thirty different international and national honor societies.

  • Alpha Sigma Nu: Founded at Marquette University in 1915, Alpha Sigma Nu is the national Jesuit Honor Society, with chapters at twenty-eight Jesuit universities throughout the United States.[3] The University of Scranton’s chapter was founded in 1943, one year after the Jesuits assumed control of the University. Alpha Sigma Nu is the oldest honor society at the University.[46][47] Alpha Sigma Nu is the only honor society at the University which accepts students and faculty from all three colleges and all disciplines.[48] Juniors and seniors who have distinguished themselves in scholarship, loyalty and service are eligible for membership. Its selection process is rigorous. First, the Registrar compiles lists of students in the top 15% of their classes based on GPA, separately for juniors, seniors, and graduate students based on their college.[49] Juniors are those having completed 60-89 credits; seniors 90+ credits; graduate students at least 18 graduate credits. Then, the honor society solicits nominations from current ΑΣΝ members, including faculty, staff, and student members, who have received the list of students in the top 15% of their classes.[49] The chapter coordinator and faculty advisor compile the nominations. The student officers review the nominations and make selections of student nominees. The faculty advisor provides guidance on the selection process. Student selections are sent to the deans of the respective colleges for review. Student and honorary selections are sent to the University President for his review. A letter is sent to persons approved by the President inviting them to become members of ΑΣΝ. The final list of inductees consists of those accepting membership.
  • Phi Alpha Theta: Founded in 1921, Phi Alpha Theta is the International History Honor Society. The University’s Mu Rho chapter was established in 1967.[50] In order to be eligible for membership, students must have completed at least twelve credits in history, have maintained a grade point average of at least a 3.33 in history, and rank in the top 35% of their class.[48]
  • Sigma Xi: Founded in 1886, Sigma Xi is the International Honor Society in scientific research. The University’s chapter was established in 1968 and later authorized in 1979. In order to be inducted, undergraduate and graduate students must show outstanding promise in original research.[48]
  • Sigma Pi Sigma: Founded in 1921, Sigma Pi Sigma is the National Honor Society for Physics. The University’s chapter was founded in 1969. Only schools of recognized standing which offer a strong physics major are permitted to establish chapters. In order to be inducted, undergraduate students must have completed at least nine physics credits and rank in the top third of the class. Graduate students and faculty can be induced at any time, given that they meet the requirements.[48]
  • Eta Sigma Gamma: Founded in 1967, Eta Sigma Gamma is an honor society for Health Education dedicated to promoting the discipline by elevating the standards, ideals, competence, and ethics of professional prepared men and women in health education. The University’s Epsilon Eta chapter was established in 2012. In order to be inducted, students must be Community Health Education majors, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0, and a GPA of 3.2 in the major.[48]
  • Omicron Delta Epsilon: Founded in 1963, Omicron Delta Epsilon is the International Honor Society for Economics. The University’s Xi chapter of Pennsylvania was established in 1969. In order to qualify for membership, students must have taken twelve credits in economics, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0, and have a 3.0 GPA in economics.[48]
  • Psi Chi: Founded in 1931, Psi Chi is the National Honor Society in Psychology. The University’s chapter was established in 1969. In order to qualify for membership, students must have either a minor or major in psychology, rank in the top 35% of their class, and demonstrate superior scholarship in psychology.[48]
  • Phi Delta Kappa: Founded in 1906, Phi Delta Kappa is the International Professional Fraternity for Education. The University’s chapter was established in 1970. In order to qualify for membership, inductees must be either graduate students or teachers.[48]
  • Pi Gamma Mu: Founded in 1924, Pi Gamma Mu is the International Honor Society in Social Science. The University’s chapter was established in 1970. In order to become inductees, students must have completed at least 60 credits of academic work with a minimum of 21 in economics, human services, psychology, sociology, political science or history, and have an overall GPA of 3.4.[48]
  • Alpha Sigma Lambda: Founded in 1946, Alpha Sigma Lambda is the National Honor Society which encourages scholarship and leadership among adult students in continuing higher education. The University’s Alpha Upsilon chapter was established in 1972. In order to qualify for membership, inductees must be non-traditional students who achieve and maintain outstanding scholastic standards, and demonstrate leadership abilities.[48]
  • Pi Mu Epsilon: Founded in 1914, Pi Mu Epsilon is the National Honor Society for Mathematics. The University’s chapter was established in 1973. In order to qualify for membership, students must be mathematics majors in their junior or senior year, have an overall GPA of 3.33, and have a mathematics GPA of 3.50. Additionally, biomathematics majors who meet the criteria can be nominated with an unsolicited recommendation from full-time mathematics faculty.[48]
  • Alpha Mu Gamma: Founded in 1931, Alpha Mu Gamma is the National Honor Society for Foreign Languages. The University’s Theta Iota chapter was established in 1973. In order to qualify for membership, students must have a minimum GPA of 3.0, and have completed Foreign Language classes and have received at least two A’s in those courses.[48]
  • Phi Lambda Upsilon: Founded in 1899, Phi Lambda Upsilon is the National Honor Society for Chemistry. The University’s Beta Kappa chapter was established in 1975. In order to qualify for membership, students must have at least 24 credits in chemistry and a minimum GPA of 3.0.[48]
  • Alpha Epsilon Delta: Founded in 1926, Alpha Epsilon Delta is the National Honor Society for Health Pre-Professionals. The University’s Iota chapter was established in 1976. In order to qualify for membership, students must have completed at least three semesters of pre-professional health work, have a minimum GPA of 3.2, and have a minimum science GPA of 3.2.[48]
  • Theta Alpha Kappa: Founded in 1976 at Manhattan College, Theta Alpha Kappa is the National Honor Society for Theology and Religious Studies. The University’s Alpha Nu chapter was established in 1980. In order to qualify for membership, students must have completed 12 or more credits in theology, have an overall GPA of 3.5, and have a theology GPA of 3.5.[48]
  • Sigma Tau Delta: Founded in 1924, Sigma Tau Delta is the National Honor Society for English. The University’s Mu Omicron chapter was established in 1980. In order to qualify for membership, students must have either a minor or major in English, Theatre, or Secondary Education/English, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.4, and have at least a 3.5 GPA in English, Theatre, and Writing Courses.[48]
  • Alpha Epsilon Alpha: Founded in 1980 at the University of Scranton by Fr. Joseph Hamernick, S.J., Alpha Epsilon Alpha is a Honor Society for Communications. In order to qualify for membership, students must be senior Communication majors and have a minimum 3.5 GPA.[48]
  • Alpha Kappa Delta: Founded in 1920, Alpha Kappa Delta is the International Honor Society for Sociology. The University’s Upsilon chapter was established in 1980. In order to qualify for membership, students must have completed at least 18 credits in sociology and have a minimum GPA of 3.0.[48]
  • Pi Sigma Alpha: Founded in 1920, Pi Sigma Alpha is the National Honor Society for Political Science. The University’s Kappa Iota chapter was established in 1980. In order to qualify for membership, students must be juniors or seniors, have completed at least 18 credits in political science, have a minimum political science GPA of 3.4, and rank in the top third of their class.[48]
  • Alpha Phi Sigma: Founded in 1942, Alpha Phi Sigma is the National Honor Society for Criminal Justice. The University’s Epsilon Zeta chapter was established in 1982. In order to qualify for membership, students must be juniors or seniors, have a criminal justice major or minor, have completed 12 credits of criminal justice courses, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.2, have a minimum criminal justice GPA of 3.2, and rank in the top 35% of their class.[48]
  • Phi Sigma Tau: Founded in 1930, Phi Sigma Tau is the International Honor Society for Philosophy. The University’s Tau chapter was established in 1982. In order to qualify for membership, students must have a major or minor in philosophy and demonstrate excellence in philosophy. Induction is based on nomination and voting results of philosophy faculty and current members of the society.[48]
  • Omega Beta Sigma: Founded in 1982 at the University of Scranton, Omega Beta Sigma is the Women’s Business Honor Society. In order to qualify for membership, students must have a major in minor in business, be sophomores, juniors, or seniors, and have an overall GPA of 3.25.[48]
  • Upsilon Pi Epsilon: Founded in 1967, Upsilon Pi Epsilon is the International Honor Society for Computing and Information Disciplines. It has been endorsed by both the corresponding professional organizations, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the IEEE Computer Society (IEEE-CS).[48] The University’s Gamma chapter was established in 1985. In order to qualify for membership, inductees must fit in one of the following five categories:
    • An undergraduate student must have completed at least 64 semester hours of overall credit, with at least 18 in Computing Sciences courses. He/she must have a minimum GPA of 3.2 both overall and in Computing Sciences courses.
    • A graduate student must have completed at least one half of the graduate degree requirement (15 credits in Software Engineering courses), and must have a minimum GPA of 3.5 in those courses.
    • A faculty member must have been teaching in the Computing Science program, or in a field related closely thereto, at the University of Scranton, for at least one year.
    • A former student, at the time of his/her degree, must satisfy the same requirements as outlined for an undergraduate student.
    • An honorary candidate shall be an individual of distinguished achievement in the field of Computing Science, otherwise ineligible for election to membership.[51]
  • Sigma Theta Tau: Founded in 1922, Sigma Theta Tau is the International Honor Society of Nursing. The University’s Iota Omega chapter was established in 1988. In order to qualify for membership, students must have completed one half of the nursing curriculum, demonstrated an ability in nursing, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.0, and rank in the top third of the class.[48]
  • Kappa Delta Pi: Founded in 1911, Kappa Delta Pi is the International Honor Society for Education. The University’s Sigma Chi chapter was established in 1992. In order to qualify for membership, students must have completed at least 24 credits of collegiate work, have completed at least 6 credits in education course work, have a minimum overall GPA of a 3.2, and rank in the top 20% of the class.[48][52]
  • Beta Beta Beta: Founded in 1922, Beta Beta Beta is the National Honor Society for Biology. The University’s chapter was established in 1994. In order to qualify for membership, students must be either juniors or seniors, have completed at least 9 credits in biology, have a minimum biology GPA of 3.0, and be in good academic standing at the University. Additionally, all undergraduate students interested in biology may join as associate members. The society encourages undergraduate biological research through presentations at conventions, publication in the journal BIOS, and research/travel grants.[48]
  • Beta Gamma Sigma: Founded in 1913, Beta Gamma Sigma is the Honor Society for Business, recognized by the International Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business. The University’s chapter was established in 1997. In order to qualify for membership, the academic ranking of those being considered must place them in the upper 7% of the junior class, upper 10% of the senior class or upper 20% of the graduating master’s class.[48]
  • Lambda Pi Eta: Founded in 1985, Lambda Pi Eta is the National Honor Society for Communication. The University’s chapter was established in 1999. In order to qualify for membership, students must be senior Communication majors, have earned a minimum overall GPA of 3.25, and a minimum communication GPA of 3.25.[48]
  • Alpha Lambda Delta: Founded in 1924, Alpha Lambda Delta is the National Honor Society of freshman which honors excellent academic achievement by students in the first year of study. The University’s Richard H. Passon Chapter was established in 2001. In order to qualify for membership, students must be enrolled as full-time students in a degree program, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.5 in their first semester, and rank in the top 20% of the class.[48]
  • Upsilon Phi Delta: Founded in 1999, Upsilon Phi Delta is the Honor Society for Health Administration. The University’s chapter was established in 2002. In order to qualify for membership, undergraduate and graduate students must have a minimum overall GPA of 3.5.[48]
  • Phi Epsilon Kappa: Founded in 1913, Phi Epsilon Kappa is the National Honor Society of Physical Education. The University’s Zeta Gamma chapter was established in 2004. In order to qualify for membership, students must be juniors or seniors, be Exercise Science majors, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.3, and have a minimum Exercise Science GPA of 3.5.[48]
  • Nu Rho Psi: Founded in 2007, Nu Rho Psi is the National Honor Society for Neuroscience. The University’s Alpha chapter was established in 2006. In order to qualify for membership, students must have demonstrated an interest in neuroscience, have a minimum overall GPA of 3.2, and have a minimum neuroscience GPA of 3.5.[48]

Ranking[edit]

The university has received accolades from in a number of national publications including the Princeton Review, Kaplan's Publishing, U.S. News & World Report, The Economist, Forbes and Newsweek. For 23 consecutive years, beginning in 1994, The University of Scranton has been ranked in the top 10 schools in U.S. News & World Report's rankings of the Best Master's Universities-North.[53] In the 2017 edition, Scranton placed sixth and was also recognized for "Service Learning" as well as one of the "Best Colleges for Veterans." In its 2016 guidebook, U.S. News & World Report ranked several of The University of Scranton’s master's degree programs among America’s "Best Graduate Schools." The University’s online graduate program in education ranked No. 13 in the nation. The University’s graduate program in nursing ranked No. 83.

In its 2017 guidebook, three Kania School of Management programs ranked among the top in the nation on U.S News & World Report’s business specialty lists:

  • Entrepreneurship ranked No. 13
  • Finance ranked No. 16
  • Accounting ranked No. 20[54]

The Princeton Review has named the university to its annual “Best Colleges," guidebook from 2002 to its most recent list for 2017.[55]

  • In the 2017 guidebook, The Princeton Review also recognized the University for: “Best Science Labs" (No. 4), “Best Campus Food” (No. 11), “Best College Dorms” (No. 17) and “Students Most Engaged in Community Service” (No. 20).[55]

In 2011 The Huffington Post recognized The University of Scranton as the sixth friendliest school in the United States.[56] An October 2015 report by The Economist ranked The University of Scranton No. 22 in the nation (top 2% of four-year colleges) for the impact a Scranton education has on the earnings of its graduates.[57] The Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program, published in October 2015, ranked The University of Scranton among the top 100 colleges in the nation for the increase in annual earnings it contributes to its graduates at 10 years after enrollment.[58]

The University of Scranton ranked among the top “Healthiest” college in the United States, according to an September 2016 listing posted on Greatist.com, an online source for health and fitness information.[59]

Campus buildings and landmarks[edit]

Pilarz Hall is part of the new Mulberry Street Complex, which includes housing, fitness facilities, and a food court.

Academic Buildings[edit]

  • Alumni Memorial Hall: the building was originally constructed as Alumni Memorial Library in 1960.[60] After the completion of the Weinberg Memorial Library in 1992, it underwent extensive renovations and was converted into Alumni Memorial Hall.[61] It currently houses the Psychology Department and the Division of Planning and Information Resources.[62]
  • Brennan Hall: the building was completed in 2000. It houses the departments of the Aruthur J. Kania School of Management.[63] Its five stories contain classrooms, seminar rooms, faculty offices, an advising center, the Pearn Auditorium, and the Irwin E. Alperin Financial Center, which is designed to simulate a stock market trading floor, complete with an electronic ticker and data displays.[64][65] The fifth floor of Brennan Hall is the Joseph M. McShane Executive Center, which includes a meeting room, a large reception area, the PNC Bank board room, and the Rose Room, an open space used for lectures, events, and dinners.[66]
  • Ciszek Hall: the building, originally named the Center for Eastern Christian Studies, was completed in 1987 as an ecumenical and academic institute designed to promote knowledge about and understanding of the religious and cultural traditions of Eastern Christianity.[67][68] Currently, Cisek Hall houses the university’s Office of Career Services, a chapel which celebrates service in the Byzantine Rite, and a library containing 15,000 books.[69]
  • Edward R. Leahy, Jr. Hall: the building was completed in 2015. At eight stories tall, it is currently the tallest University building and houses the departments of Exercise Science, Occupational Therapy, and Physical Therapy.[70][71] Leahy Hall contains 25 interactive rehabilitation laboratories, 9 traditional and active-learning classrooms, research facilities, multiple simulation environments, more than 50 faculty offices, 9 group study rooms, a forum for lectures and events, an Einstein Bros Bagels Cafe, and a green roof and patio.[72][73] The new building is located on the former site of the old Leahy Hall / YWCA building, on the southwest corner of Jefferson Avenue and Linden Street, which was demolished to make room for the new building.
  • Houlihan-McLean Center: the Victorian Gothic style building was constructed in 1910 as the Immanuel Baptist Church. The University acquired the former church in 1986, after its congregation moved to a different church.[74] Currently, it houses the school’s Performance Music Program, which includes the university’s Orchestra, Bands, and Singers, as well as serving as a site for musical and other arts performances, lectures, and special liturgies.[75] The main floor of the building houses the Aula (an approximately 650 seat concert hall), the Atrium (a recital and reception hall), the Nelhybel Collection Research Room, small ensembles areas, a musicians' lounge, practice rooms, offices, music library, and an organ loft and organ chamber, which holds an historic 1910 Austin Opus 301 symphonic pipe organ.[76]
  • Hyland Hall: the building, completed in 1987, is a four-story facility which contains sixteen classrooms and a 180-seat tiered lecture hall, in addition to a cafe, lounge, and the University's Hope Horn Art Gallery.[77][78] Currently, it mostly houses classes for the Departments of Political Science, Sociology, Criminal Justice, and World Languages and Cultures.
  • Institute of Molecular Biology and Medicine: the building was completed in 1996 and houses research laboratories, offices, and the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.[79] The IMBM is dedicated to the molecular biological research, chiefly in the field of proteomics, in order to find and treat viral diseases and cancer as well as to be able to engineer a patient’s immune system to avoid these diseases and to develop DNA probes that could possibly seek out a defective gene that is responsible for cancer.[80]
  • Loyola Science Center: completed in 2011, the building houses the University’s Biology, Chemistry, Computing Sciences, Mathematics, and Physics/Electrical Engineering departments as well as any programs currently associated with these departments.[81] The construction of the Loyola Science Center involved integrating a new four-story structure into an existing structure, the Harper-McGinnis wing of St. Thomas Hall.[82] The unified building includes 22 class and seminar rooms, 34 laboratories, 80 offices, a 180-seat lecture hall, an atrium and coffee shop, a vivarium, and a rooftop greenhouse for research.[83]
  • McDade Center for Literary and Performing Arts: constructed in 1992, the building serves as the home for the University's English & Theatre department.[84] It contains classrooms, offices, labs, meeting spaces, a black box studio theatre, the 300-seat Royal Theater where the University Players stage their productions, computer writing and instructions lab, a seminar room, a small screening room for film classes and an office for Esprit, the university's Review of Arts and Letters.[85]
  • McGurrin Hall: the building was completed in 1998. It houses many of the departments in the J.A. Panuska College of Professional Studies, including Education, Nursing, Counseling and Human Services, and Health Administration and Human Resources. McGurrin's four stories include classrooms, laboratories, teaching instruction labs, and counseling suites as well as the Panuska College of Professional Studies’ advising center and administration offices.[86][87] In the basement of McGurrin Hall, the University created the Leahy Community Health & Family Center, which meets the health and wellness needs of underserved individuals in the greater Scranton community while providing a place where faculty guide students in a practical educational experience through its programs, which include the University of Success, the Alice V. Leahy Food and Clothing Pantry, the Edward R. Leahy, Jr. Center Clinic, “Peacemakers After School,” and “Growing Stronger.”[88][89]
  • O'Hara Hall: the Neoclassical, six-story building was built in 1922 as the administrative headquarters for the Glen Alden Coal Company.[90] Acquired by the University in 1968, it originally housed the departments of the Kania School of Management until the construction of Brennan Hall.[91][92] It now serves as the home for the Dexter Hanley College (now the College of Graduate and Continuing Education), Alumni Relations, the Annual Fund, Continuing Education, Development, the World Languages and Cultures department, Instructional Development, the Learning Resource Center, the Political Science department, Public Relations, and the Sociology and Criminal Justice department.[93] It contains classrooms, faculty offices, supporting administrative services, conference rooms, and the language learning laboratory.
  • St. Thomas Hall: the building, constructed at the corner of Linden and Monroe Streets, was completed in 1962.[94] At the time of its completion, the five-story L-shaped building contained 50 classrooms, 15 utility rooms, 11 equipment rooms, 10 corridors, 128 offices, ROTC offices, student lounges, the St. Ignatius Loyola Chapel, and four laboratories.[95][96] In 1987, the Harper-McGinnis Wing, a two-floor addition that contained offices and laboratories, was added to St. Thomas Hall to house the Physics and Electronics Engineering department.[97][98] Recently, in 2009 and 2011, St. Thomas underwent significant renovations. The Chapel was converted into offices for Human Resources and Financial Aid and it now houses the departments of Theology and Religious Studies, Communications, Philosophy, History as well as the office of LA/WS, or Latin American and Women’s Studies, and the University’s radio station, 99.5 WUSR.[82][99]
  • Smurfit Arts Center: the Romanesque building was constructed in 1906 as the Universalist John Raymond Memorial Church. The University acquired the property in 1987, after its congregation moved to a different church.[100] Currently, it houses the Fine Arts program, including faculty offices, classrooms, and a studio.[101] Originally, the church contained Tiffany Glass stained glass windows, which were moved to Hyland Hall to provide optimum and natural lighting for the studio.
  • Weinberg Memorial Library: the Library was completed in 1992, replacing Alumni Memorial Library which proved unable to serve adequately the growing student population, to house the vast library collections, and lacked the necessary wiring for modernizing the library with new technological advances.[102][103] The Library has five floors, which seat approximately 700 students at one time and hold the University's extensive library collections. The Library is home to the University of Scranton Archives and Special Collections. In addition to study space and books, it contains administrative offices, two classrooms, group study rooms, a Java City cafe, the Reilly Learning Commons, and the Scranton Heritage Room, an open hall used to host campus and community events and to exhibit artifacts and documents from the university’s archives and special collections, showcases of faculty scholarship and university alumni authors, and the library's Environmental Art Show.[104]

Additional facilities[edit]

  • Brown Hall: the Classicial Revivalist building was constructed in 1896. Acquired by the University in 2012, the four-story structure contains University offices, including the Small Business Development Center and the Division of External Affairs as well as some retail spaces on the first floor, rented out to various businesses.[105]
  • Byron Recreation Center: completed in 1986, the building serves as the home for recreational and intramural activities for the University's student body.[106] The three-level structure connects to the Long Center, the facility for intercollegiate athletics.[107] The facility contains three multi-use courts for basketball, volleyball, tennis, and one-wall handball as well as a one-tenth mile indoor running track, a six-lane Olympic-sized swimming pool complete with diving boards and an electronic scoreboard, four 4-wall racquetball courts, two different aerobics/dance rooms, and men's and women’s locker rooms.[108]
  • Campion Hall: the building, completed in 1987, is the University’s residence building for the Jesuit community, who originally lived in the Estate since their arrival at the University in 1942, which proved too small to accommodate the priests.[109] The two-story building features thirty-one bedrooms, an interior garden, an office, kitchen and dining facilities, and a chapel. Currently, Campion Hall provides housing for Jesuits who teach or hold administrative positions at the University of Scranton or at Scranton Preparatory School, a local Jesuit high school.[110][111]
  • Chapel of the Sacred Heart: completed in 1928, the building was originally part of the Scranton Estate, designed as a small athletic facility, containing a gym and a squash court.[112] The building, after being donated to the University in 1958, served as the center of athletics, a print shop, and the headquarters for the University's Alumni Association before being converted into a chapel in 2009.[113] Currently, the Chapel is used for daily masses, Eucharistic Adoration, and prayer by students, faculty, and staff of the University of Scranton.[114]
  • DeNaples Center: the campus center completed in 2008, replacing the Gunster Memorial Student Center, since its facilities could no longer effectively serve the expanding student body.[115] The DeNaples Center houses the campus bookstore, the student mail center, commuter lockers, a Provisions on Demand (P.O.D.) convenience, a dining hall, a fireplace lounge, the Rev. Bernard R. McIllhenny, S.J. Ballroom, meeting rooms, the Ann and Leo Moscovitz Theater, and the first floor DeNaples Food Court, a retail dining option which includes Starbucks Coffee, Chick-Fil-A, and Quizno’s.[116] The center also contains offices for Student Affairs, University Ministries, and the Student Forum which comprises the Center for Student Engagement, the University of Scranton Programming Board (USPB), the Aquinas newspaper, the Windhover yearbook, the Jane Kopas Women's Center, the Multicultural Center, Student Government, and Community Outreach.[117]
  • Dionne Green: in 2008, after the completion of the DeNaples Center and the subsequent demolition of Gunster Memorial Student Center, the university created the Dionne Green, a 25,000-square-foot green space roughly the size of a football field featuring a 3,600 sq ft outdoor amphitheater.[118] Located directly in front of the DeNaples Center, it serves as the gateway to the campus.[119]
  • The Estate: in 1867, Joseph H. Scranton, one of the founders of the city of Scranton, commissioned the building of his family home in the French Second Empire Style, which was completed in 1871.[120] The twenty-five room, three story residence contained a billiards room, a ballroom, a library, a Tiffany Glass skylight, and a solid mahogany staircase.[121] The Estate was occupied by members of the Scranton family until 1941, when Worthington Scranton donated the home and its adjoining estate to the University.[122] The home was used as the Jesuit residence from 1942 until 1987 and currently houses the Admissions Office.[123]
  • Fitzpatrick Field: the field was completed in 1984. The facility was designed as a multi-sports complex, complete with a regulation-size field for men’s and women’s soccer which also can be used for other sports such as lacrosse, field hockey, and intramural athletics.[124] It also has bleachers, an electronic scoreboard, a maintenance building, a storage area, and a parking lot. In 1997, a re-dedication ceremony celebrated the installation of new artificial turf and improved lighting for the field.[125] Currently, Fitzpatrick Field remains the university’s primary outdoor athletic facility.
  • Founder's Green: in 2001, after the demolition of the Gallery Building whose departments had been moved to O'Hara and Hyland Halls, the university created Founder's Green, a large, open green space in front of Brennan Hall.[126][127]
  • Galvin Terrace: after the completion of St. Thomas Hall and the subsequent demolition of the Barracks buildings, the University created an outdoor recreation facility, containing four volleyball courts, three basketball courts, a grass practice field for football and soccer, and a faculty parking lot.[128][129] Later, after renovations, it included six tennis courts, two combination basketball/volleyball courts, and four handball/racquetball courts.[130] In the early 1990s, the recreational complex was demolished to make room for the Weinberg Memorial Library and now a small garden outside the Library is known as Galvin Terrace.[131]
  • Long Center: completed in 1967, the building contained the university’s first indoor athletic facilities, as well as instructional areas for physical education.[132] At the time of its construction, the top floor featured a large entrance foyer and a gymnasium, complete with movable bleacher seats that could accommodate up to 4,500 people. The gymnasium contained three basketball courts, two ticket rooms, a sound control room, locker room facilities, a training room, a weight room, a wrestling room, laundry facilities, and equipment room, and offices for the director and assistants of the physical education program as well as athletic coaches.[133] From 2001 until 2015, it housed the Department of Exercise Science, including offices, classrooms, a fitness assessment center, and laboratories for sport biomechanics, body composition, cardio-metabolic analysis, biochemistry, and muscular skeletal fitness, which was then moved to Leahy Hall.
  • Mosque: in 1996, the university community renovated a University-owned house at 317 North Webster Avenue into the Campus Mosque as a gift to the Muslim community of Scranton.[134] The Mosque contained two large, spacious rooms as the women’s and men’s prayer rooms, a library, and an apartment where two members of the Muslim Student Association lived and served as caretakers of the facility.[135] In 2007, the Mosque, along with several other properties, was razed in order to create a site for the sophomore residence, Condron Hall.[136] The university then purchased and renovated a house at 306 Taylor Avenue for use as the new mosque, which is open to the public for prayer and reflection.
  • Pantle Rose Garden: when the University of Scranton acquired the Scranton family estate in the mid-1950s, the school received the garden, located next to the Chapel of the Sacred Heart on the former grounds of the Estate.[137]
  • Parking and Public Safety Pavilion: completed in 1995, the Parking and Public Safety Pavilion accommodates 510 cars in its five stories, with one floor below ground, one floor at ground level, and three above ground.[138] Additionally, the parking garage contains the offices of the university's police and the offices of parking services.[139]
  • Quain Memorial Conservatory: the Victorian-style structure, built in 1872, was part of the Scranton family Estate and donated to the University in 1958.[140] The glass building has a central square (20 ft by 20 ft) flanked by two 40 ft by 15 ft wings on either side. At the time of its construction, each section had its own pool.[141] In the early 1970s, the student-led University Horticultural Society coordinated and organized an effort to renovate and restore the greenhouse.[142] Currently, the greenhouse is used for classes as well as faculty and personal research projects.
  • Retreat Center at Chapman Lake: in 1961, the University of Scranton purchased a nine-acre tract of lakefront property containing three buildings on Chapman Lake, about 30 minutes away from the University.[143] For several years, it was chiefly used as a place for relaxation by the Jesuits and for conferences with faculty members and student leaders.[144] As time progressed, the University’s Office of Campus Ministries began using the Chapman Lake property as a Retreat Center.[145] The site originally had one old retreat house, featuring several bedrooms equipped with bunkbeds, a small chapel, a main room with a fireplace, a kitchen, and dining area. In 1998, the University expanded the lakeside Conference and Retreat Center. Doubling the size of the center, the new 16,000 square-foot facility contained a dining room, kitchen, a large meeting room nicknamed the Lake Room, five small meeting rooms, and a residential wing with 11 bedrooms.[146] In 2005, in order to meet the growing demand for retreats, the University expanded the Retreat Center again. The new addition contained a lounge, 21 more bedrooms, and the Peter Faber chapel with large window views of the Lake.[147][148] Retreats offered at Chapman Lake are usually offered and run by staff and students from the University of Scranton's Office of Campus Ministries. More than 1,400 people participate annually in about 50 retreats and other spiritual programs conducted at Chapman Lake by the university. Retreats are offered virtually every weekend, including retreats for seniors as they prepare to end their college careers, for students interested in learning about Ignatian spirituality, for students who have never experienced a retreat before, for students seeking a better understanding of faith and Christian living, and for participants searching for answers to help them through the challenges they face as students.
  • Roche Wellness Center: the building, constructed in 1986, formerly housed Hazzouri’s pharmacy and drugstore as well as a restaurant named Babe’s Place.[149] It was acquired by the University in 1992 and opened as the Student Health and Wellness Center in 1996 and the Drug and Alcohol Information Center and Educators (DICE) Office.[150] The building holds a reception area, four exam rooms, a laboratory, an assessment room, an observation room, and storage space.
  • Rock Hall: in 1983, the University of Scranton purchased the Assembly of God Church from the Reformed Episcopalian congregation who could no longer properly maintain the facility as the costs and utilities were too high.[151] Rock Hall houses the Madonna della Strada Chapel, which serves as the primary site for the university’s major liturgical services, including the regular Sunday masses.[152] Currently, the first floor of Rock Hall is the home of the university's Military Science department and ROTC program.[153]
  • Scranton Hall: constructed in 1871, Scranton Hall was built as a one-story carriage house and stable on the Scranton family Estate by Joseph H. Scranton.[154] In 1928, Worthington Scranton and his wife added an additional story, renovating the building and converting it into an office space. The building was donated to the University in 1958.[155] Since it was acquired, the building has been used to house the President’s Office and other administrative offices.[154]
  • University Commons are the main walkways through the university's campus. In 1980, the University of Scranton received approval from the Scranton City Council to close to vehicular traffic the portion of Linden Street which ran through the campus in order to unify the campus and create a safer environment for its students.[156][157] Later, in the early 1990s, the university also closed part of Quincy Avenue and converted it into a pedestrian walkway.[158]

Student Housing[edit]

The university has 13 traditional residences: Casey Hall, Denis Edward Hall, Driscoll Hall, Fitch Hall, Gannon Hall, Lavis Hall, McCormick Hall, Hafey Hall, Hannan Hall, Lynett Hall, Martin Hall, McCourt Hall, Nevils Hall, which provide housing for first-year students. These residence halls contain traditional double-rooms that share a community restroom on each floor. Most of these buildings were constructed in the 1960s, when the University was becoming a residential campus.

Sophomore students are offered suite-style housing, in which two double rooms share a shower and toilet, with each room having its own sink. There are three buildings, clustered together on the edge of the campus, which house sophomores: Condron Hall (2008), Redington Hall, and Gavigan Hall.[159]

Junior and senior students are offered apartments and houses, which have more private options for residents. The University's apartment buildings include: Linden St. Apartments, Madison Square, Mulberry Plaza, Montrone Hall, and Pilarz Hall. The University also owns a number of residential houses scattered throughout the campus and the historic Hill Section of the city which they use to house students depending on the need for additional housing, most of which were originally acquired during the 1970s and 1980s. These include: Blair House, Fayette House, Gonzaga House, Herold House, Liva House, McGowan House, Cambria House, Monroe House, Tioga House, and Wayne House. After sophomore year, students can also elect to live off-campus in the residential and historic Hill Section located adjacent to the University's campus.

Graduate students can either chose to rent houses in the Hill Section, or live in the University-owned Quincy Apartments, located on the 500 block of Quincy Avenue which was just transformed from an abandoned high school into an early childhood learning center and University graduate housing in 2015.[160][161]

Athletics[edit]

Athletics logo

Scranton athletes compete at the NCAA Division III. In 2007, Scranton joined the newly formed Landmark Conference, which ended a long history with the Middle Atlantic/Freedom Conference.

The school offers 19 varsity sports and has won national championships in Men's Basketball in 1976 and 1983 and Women's Basketball in 1985.[162] The university's basketball teams play at the John Long Center located in the heart of the campus. The university's soccer and field hockey teams play at Fitzpatrick Field, also on campus.

In February 2012, the university fully acquired the South Side Sports Complex in Scranton. The complex was converted into NCAA-regulation fields for soccer, baseball, and softball. The complex includes a child's play area and public basketball courts.[163]

In February 2016, the athletic director suspended the Men's and Women's Swimming and Diving team from the Landmark Conference championship meet for alleged hazing.[164][165]

In fall 2016, women's golf was added to the athletics program. They debuted with a 5-0 victory in September 2016.[166]

Student life[edit]

Media[edit]

The Aquinas, the university's student newspaper, publishes on Thursday during the academic year. WUSR 99.5 is the college radio station owned and operated by the University of Scranton.

The University of Scranton alma mater[edit]

The hours too quickly slip away
And mingle into years
But memories of our Scranton days will last
Whatever next appears.
The legacy from those before
Is briefly ours to hold,
We leave the best behind for others
As the coming years unfold.

With faith in lives that touch us here
And paths that ours have crossed
We know that reaching for the rising sun
Is surely worth the cost.
May God be ever at our side,
May goodness fill our days.
We hail as loving sons and daughters
Alma mater ours always.[167]

Student government[edit]

History of the Student Senate[edit]

The Student Senate came about in the spring semester of 2002 with the ratification of its Constitution. On May 3, 2002 the first Student Senate meeting was held in the Office of Student Activities. Today, the Student Senate assembles for regular sessions on a biweekly basis and for emergency sessions as necessary.

The Student Senate is the main avenue of governance for the students. The Student Senate deals with pertinent issues that affect the day-to-day lives of students at The University of Scranton. The Senate is chaired by the Vice-President of Student Government who votes only in the case of a tie. The other Executive members of Student Government are the President, a nonvoting member with veto authority, as well as the Secretary and Treasurer, both non-voting members. The body of the Student Senate is made up of the non-voting executive positions, and four equal representatives from each class, two commuter representatives, two off-campus representatives, and two resident representatives for a total of 26 members, 22 of which have voting rights.

There are four standing committees formed out of the Senate: Safety and Crime Prevention, Student Life and Dining Services, Academic Affairs, and Appropriations. Proposed legislation is sent to the appropriate committee for research and development at the discretion of the Chair. The Executive Treasurer advises the Appropriations Committee; a Senator appointed by the Executive Council chairs each of the committees.

University Police[edit]

The University of Scranton Police Department came about in 2009, after being the office of Public Safety before then. The transition of employing full-time police officers that were now armed was deemed necessary as the campus population was expanding rapidly. At the time, then Public Safety Officers still had full arrest powers, but weren’t actually considered “police.” What made this transition easy is that the officers were already ACT 120 certified, which all Pennsylvania municipal police must receive. It is simply another term for basic academy training, which of course all USPD officers have. Most, if not all, officers at the time worked part-time elsewhere as a Police Officer, so they did not require any additional training.

USPD is a full-time police department, operating 24/7 and 365 days a year. It is the second largest department of Lackawanna county, after the City of Scranton Police Department.

The department employs a Chief, a Captain, a Compliance Manager, an Operations Manager, an Investigator, four Sergeants, Patrol Officers, Service Officers, dispatchers, and lastly, Student Officers. The department has four patrol vehicles as well. In 2016, the department changed the sign of “Office of Public Safety,” to “University Police.” Subsequently, it became accredited from the state of Pennsylvania. This means that the department meets rigorous standards concerning overall performance. The University of Scranton Police Department is only one out of a select few universities that is accredited from the state. One of the benefits of this is that being accredited reduces liability, and ensures all polices are being meet. Considering this is such a relatively new department, it is surely an impressive accomplishment for a department so young, in retrospect.

University of Scranton presidents[edit]

Notable alumni[edit]

There are more than 49,000 alumni worldwide.[168]

Fictional alumni[edit]

Notable faculty[edit]

  • James A. Martin, S.J. – former chairperson of the Department of Theology (1946–1949); world's oldest Jesuit until his death in 2007 at the age of 105.[174]
  • David O. Friedrichs – Sociology and Criminal Justice Department; highly renowned American Criminologist and publisher. Authored the textbooks "Law in Our Lives," and "Trusted Criminals," along with multiple book journals and reviews.

Notable honorary degree recipients[edit]

University of Scranton Press[edit]

The University of Scranton Press is a university press that is part of The University of Scranton. Its publications include books on religious and philosophical issues and local (Northeastern Pennsylvania) history, including coal mining. In the summer of 2010 the university announced that it was no longer accepting submissions for publication and would discontinue the Press after all current projects were completed.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°24′22″N 75°39′25″W / 41.406°N 75.657°W / 41.406; -75.657