Screen (journal)

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Screen  
Discipline Film and television studies
Language English
Edited by Tim Bergfelder, Alison Butler, Dimitris Eleftheriotis, Karen Lury, Alastair Phillips, Jackie Stacey, Sarah Street
Publication details
Publication history
1952–present
Publisher
Standard abbreviations
Screen
Indexing
ISSN 0036-9543 (print)
1460-2474 (web)
LCCN 91642840
OCLC no. 59715510
Links

Screen is an academic journal of film and television studies based at the John Logie Baird Centre at the University of Glasgow and published by Oxford University Press. The editors-in-chief are Tim Bergfelder (University of Southampton), Alison Butler (University of Reading), Dimitris Eleftheriotis (University of Glasgow), Karen Lury (University of Glasgow), Alastair Phillips (University of Warwick), Jackie Stacey (University of Manchester), and Sarah Street (University of Bristol).

History[edit]

Screen originated in the Society of Film Teachers' journal, The Film Teacher, in 1952. Soon after, the society was renamed as the Society for Education in Film and Television and its journal changed its name to Screen Education in 1960. Screen Education was renamed to Screen in 1969, although a separate journal titled Screen Education was also published.[citation needed]

During the 1970s, Screen was particularly influential in the nascent field of film studies. It published many articles that have become standards in the field—including Laura Mulvey's seminal work, "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" (1975).[1] It is still highly regarded in academic circles.

Screen theory, a Marxist-psychoanalytic film theory that came to prominence in Britain in the early 1970s, took its name from Screen.[2]

Abstracting and indexing[edit]

The journal is abstracted and indexed in:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Laura Mulvey (1975). "Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema". Screen. 16 (3): 6–18. 
  2. ^ Miklitsch, Robert (2006). "The Suture Scenario: Audiovisuality and PostScreen Theory". Roll Over Adorno: Critical Theory, Popular Culture, Audiovisual Media. Albany: SUNY. p. 69. ISBN 978-0-7914-6733-6. Retrieved May 16, 2017. 

External links[edit]