Scutellaria baicalensis

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Scutellaria baicalensis
Scutellaria baicalensis flowers.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Tracheophytes
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Lamiales
Family: Lamiaceae
Genus: Scutellaria
Species:
S. baicalensis
Binomial name
Scutellaria baicalensis
Synonyms

Scutellaria macrantha Fisch.[1]

Scutellaria baicalensis, with the common name Baikal skullcap or Chinese skullcap, is a species of flowering plant in the family Lamiaceae.

Distribution[edit]

The plant is native to China, Korea, Mongolia, and Russia in the Russian Far East and Siberia.[1]

Traditional Chinese medicine[edit]

It is one of the 50 fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine, where it has the name huángqín (Chinese: ).[2] As a Chinese traditional medicine, huang qin usually refers to the dried root of S. baicalensis Georgi, S. viscidula Bge., S. amoena C.H. Wright, and S. ikoninkovii Ju.

Phytochemicals[edit]

Several phytochemicals have been isolated from the root; baicalein, baicalin, wogonin, norwogonin, oroxylin A[3] and β-sitosterol are the major ones.[4]

Names[edit]

As the term 'skullcap' is applied to over 200 plant varieties, the scientific name is used. Sometimes, Scutellaria lateriflora (North American skullcap) is mistaken for S. baicalensis.

Adverse effects[edit]

There have been several reports and small case series of acute liver injury with jaundice arising 1 to 3 months after starting herbal or dietary supplements containing S. baicalensis.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Scutellaria baicalensis". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved 2008-02-19.
  2. ^ Zhang XW; Li WF; Li WW; Ren KH; Fan CM; Chen YY; Shen YL (2011). "Protective effects of the aqueous extract of Scutellaria baicalensis against acrolein-induced oxidative stress in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells". Pharm Biol. 49 (3): 256–261. doi:10.3109/13880209.2010.501803. PMID 20979538.
  3. ^ Isolation and purification of baicalein, wogonin and oroxylin A from the medicinal plant Scutellaria baicalensis by high-speed counter-current chromatography. Hua-Bin Li and Feng Chen, Journal of Chromatography A, 13 May 2005, Volume 1074, Issues 1–2, pages 107–110, doi:10.1016/j.chroma.2005.03.088
  4. ^ Yang LX, Liu D, Feng XF, Cui SL, Yang JY, Tang XJ, He XR, Liu JF, Hu SL (2002). "[Determination of flavone for Scutellaria baicalensis from different areas by HPLC]". Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi (in Chinese). 27 (3): 166–70. PMID 12774393.
  5. ^ "LiverTox: Clinical and Research Information on Drug-Induced Liver Injury". United States National Library of Medicine. 2012. PMID 31644066. Retrieved 27 June 2022.

External links[edit]

Data related to Scutellaria baicalensis at Wikispecies