Señorío de Sanlúcar

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Señorío de Sanlúcar
Lordship of Sanlúcar

Señorío de Sanlúcar (in Spanish)
Sanlucarreko Jaurerria (in Basque)
1297–1645
Flag of Señorío de Sanlúcar
Flag
{{{coat_alt}}}
Coat of arms
Common languagesLatin, Soa, Arabic
Religion
Roman Catholic
Islam
GovernmentIndependent Lordship, Lordship Associated with Dukedom of Medina Sidonia
King
House of Guzmán
House of Medina Sidonia
 
• 1297
Alfonso Pérez de Guzmán el Bueno
• 1309
Juan Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y Coronel
Historical eraMiddle Ages - Early Modern
• Established
1297
• Disestablished
1645
Preceded by
Emirate of Granada
Today part ofSanlúcar de Barrameda,  Spain
Part of a series on the
History of Spain
HISPANIAE ET PORTUGALIAE REGNA
Timeline
Flag of Spain.svg Spain portal

The Señorío de Sanlúcar or Lordship of Sanlúcar was an independent Christian lordship in the Kingdom of Castile located in and around the modern day city of Sanlúcar de Barrameda. It was taken from the Kingdom of Granada in 1295.

History[edit]

Establishment[edit]

The Señorío de Sanlúcar was a Spanish Lordship located in the Kingdom of Seville which in turn belonged at the time of its formation to the Kingdom of Castile. The Señorío was created by order of King Sancho IV of Castile on 4 April 1295 and granted to Alfonso Pérez de Guzmán el Bueno for services rendered to the Castilian crown, specifically, his heroic defence of Tarifa during the Spanish Reconquista. Although Sancho IV died before handing over control officially to Guzmán el Bueno, his son, Ferdinand IV of Castile confirmed the handover to Guzmán as follows La Villa de Sanlúcar con todos sus pobladores, términos y pertenencias, y los pechos y derechos que allí tenía y deber había (En: The Lordship of the town of Sanlúcar with all its people, income and belongings and the rights which this land held and should hold). The handover was signed at Toro on 13 October 1297 and the original documents are archived at the Archive of the House of Medina Sidonia. Alfonso Pérez de Guzmán el Bueno and his descendants used the denomination Señor de Sanlúcar as the first and most prestigious of their noble titles.

Early Years[edit]

In its inception, the Señorío de Sanlúcar included the town of Sanlúcar which is today the city of Sanlúcar de Barrameda and its surrounding lands which included the Port of Barrameda, Trebujena, Chipiona and Rota. These four supplementary towns which originally formed the Señorío de Sanlúcar were separated from the Señorío as part of the dowry of Isabel Pérez de Guzmán, one of the daughters of Alfonso Pérez de Guzmán el Bueno who went on to marry Fernán Ponce de Léon. Thereafter, these towns were incorporated into the collective holdings of the House of Ponce de León a branch of the House of Arcos.

Control to the House of Medina Sidonia[edit]

Trebujena was made into an independent town chartae populationis on 21 April 1494 by order of Juan Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y de Ribera, the III Duke of Medina Sidonia.

The Señorío de Sanlúcar was the power base of the House of Medina Sidonia until 1645 when Sanlúcar de Barrameda was incorporated into the Spanish crown. This occurred in the aftermath of the Andalusian independentist conspiracy, an effort by the House of Medina Sidonia to consolidate power at the expense of the Spanish crown.[1] As a result, much of their holdings were confiscated by the crown. Today, the Costa Noroeste de Cádiz roughly encapsulates the former extent of the original Señorío de Sanlúcar.

The Señors de Sanlúcar[edit]

Señor de Sanlúcar Period Notes
--
Alfonso Pérez de Guzmán el Bueno 1297 - 1309 I Señor de Sanlúcar
Juan Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y Coronel 1309 - 1351 II Señor de Sanlúcar
Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y Ponce de León 1351 - 30 May 1365 III Señor de Sanlúcar
Juan Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y Osorio 1365 - 5 October 1396 IV Señor de Sanlúcar
Enrique Pérez de Guzmán y Castilla 1396 - 31 October 1436 V Señor de Sanlúcar
Juan Alonso de Guzmán y Suárez de Figueroa Orozco 1436 - December 1468 VI Señor de Sanlúcar, I Duke of Medina Sidonia
Enrique Pérez de Guzmán y Fonseca 1468 - 1492 VII Señor de Sanlúcar, II Duke of Medina Sidonia, I Marqués de Gibraltar
Juan Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y de Ribera 1492 - 1507 VIII Señor de Sanlúcar, III Duke of Medina Sidonia, I Marqués de Cazaza
Enrique Pérez de Guzmán y Fernández de Velasco 1507 - 1512 IX Señor de Sanlúcar, IV Duke of Medina Sidonia
Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y Pérez de Guzmán (Aragonese) 1512 - 1518 X Señor de Sanlúcar, V Duke of Medina Sidonia
Juan Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y Pérez de Guzmán 1518 - 26 November 1558 XI Señor de Sanlúcar, VI Duke of Medina Sidonia
Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y Sotomayor 1558 - 26 July 1615 XII Señor de Sanlúcar, VII Duke of Medina Sidonia
Manuel Alonso Pérez de Guzmán y Gómez de Silva 1615 - 1636 XIII Señor de Sanlúcar, VII Duke of Medina Sidonia
Gaspar Pérez de Guzmán y Gómez de Sandoval y Rojas[2] 1636 - 1645 XIV Señor de Sanlúcar, IX Duke of Medina Sidonia
Philip IV of Spain 1645 - December 1665 Title taken by Monarchy - King of Spain
Charles II of Spain 1665 - 1700 King of Spain
Philip V of Spain 1700 - 1724 King of Spain
Louis I of Spain 1724 - 1724 King of Spain
Philip V of Spain 1724 - 1746 King of Spain
Ferdinand VI of Spain 1746 - 1759 King of Spain
Charles III of Spain 1759 - 1788 King of Spain
Charles IV of Spain 1788 - 1808 King of Spain
Ferdinand VII of Spain and Joseph Bonaparte 1808 - 1833
1808 - 1814
King of Spain
Isabella II of Spain 1833 - 1868 Queen of Spain Deposed
Amadeo I of Spain 1870 - 1873 King of Spain
Alfonso XII of Spain 1874 - 1885 King of Spain
Alfonso XIII of Spain 1886 - 1931 King of Spain
King Juan Carlos I of Spain 1975–Present Day King of Spain, House of Borbon

References[edit]

  • Much of the information on this page was translated from its Spanish and Euskara equivalents.
  1. ^ Salas Almela, Luis (2013). The Conspiracy of the Ninth Duke of Medina Sidonia (1641): An Aristocrat in the Crisis of the Spanish Empire. BRILL. ISBN 9004255753.
  2. ^ Salas Almela, Luis (2013). The Conspiracy of the Ninth Duke of Medina Sidonia (1641): An Aristocrat in the Crisis of the Spanish Empire. BRILL. ISBN 9004255753.

Bibliography[edit]

Coordinates: 40°24′30″N 1°26′22″W / 40.40833°N 1.43944°W / 40.40833; -1.43944