SeaLand

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SeaLand
Headquarters Miramar, Florida
Website www.sealand.com

SeaLand, a division of the Maersk Group, is an intra-regional container shipping company headquartered in Miramar, Florida with representation in 29 countries across the Americas. The company offers ocean and intermodal services using container ships, trucks, and rail serving customers between North and South America, Central America and the Caribbean.[1]

Origins[edit]

The original SeaLand was founded by the late Malcolm McLean, an American trucking entrepreneur, who revolutionized the shipping industry by packing goods in uniform containers (containerization) that could be transported quickly and seamlessly between modes of transportation.[2] This process offered companies significant time and cost savings that facilitated distribution and expanded international trade.[3]

On April 26, 1956, McLean introduced the world's first container ship, the Ideal-X, which sailed from Newark, New Jersey to Houston, Texas with 58 aluminum trailers (containers) on its deck.[4][5]

In April 1960, the company name was changed from Pan-Atlantic Steamship Corporation to Sea-Land Service, Inc., an international shipping company.

From 1967 to 1973, SeaLand became notable for delivering 1,200 containers a month to the Indochina peninsula during the Vietnam War, resulting in $450 million in revenues from the U.S. Defense Department.[6][7]

From 1960 to 1999, SeaLand was owned by R.J. Reynolds Co., CSX Corporation and others.

Recent history[edit]

In March 1999, CSX separated SeaLand into three entities: an international shipping company, a domestic shipping company, and a terminal operator.[8]

In December 1999, Maersk Line’s parent company A.P. Moller – Maersk acquired the international container shipping business and the SeaLand name.[9][10]

In 2000, Maersk Line changed its commercial name globally to "Maersk SeaLand"[11] as a result of SeaLand’s acquisition the previous year.

In 2003, the Carlisle Group bought the domestic shipping line from CSX and changed the name to Horizon Lines.[12]

In 2006, the commercial name SeaLand ceased to exist when, the then known as "Maersk SeaLand," changed its name to "Maersk Line" after the purchase of Royal P&O Nedlloyd.[13]

In January 2014, due to the strong brand recognition throughout the intra-Americas region,[14] the Maersk Group announced the revival of the SeaLand brand as a specialized intra-regional carrier, taking over the existing Maersk Line network for intra-Americas trade starting January 2015.[15]

In January 2015, SeaLand started operations as the standalone carrier of the Americas for Maersk Group.

Management[edit]

In 2014, Craig Mygatt was named CEO of SeaLand. Others joining the former Maersk Line veteran on the executive management team include:[16][17]

  • Shane Sawyer - Chief Financial Officer
  • TBD - Chief Commercial Officer
  • Tim Child - Chief Operations Officer
  • Thiago Covre - Chief Line Officer

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Products". SeaLand. SeaLand. Retrieved 18 February 2016. 
  2. ^ Churchill, John. "SeaLand reborn with great expectations". Maersk. Maersk Post. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  3. ^ Levinson, Marc. "The Box That Changed Asia and the World". Forbes. Forbes. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  4. ^ Levinson, Marc. "The Box That Changed Asia and the World". Forbes. Forbes. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  5. ^ "Transforming the Waterfront". America on the Move. America on the Move. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  6. ^ Levinson, Marc. "The Box That Changed Asia and the World". Forbes. Forbes. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  7. ^ "Return of the Sea-Land". Ships & Ports. Ships & Ports. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  8. ^ Churchill, John. "SeaLand reborn with great expectations". Maersk. Maersk Post. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  9. ^ Churchill, John. "SeaLand reborn with great expectations". Maersk. Maersk Post. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  10. ^ Kimble, Jenifer (September 8, 2014). "SeaLand to re-enter Latin America trade". American Journal of Transportation (587). Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  11. ^ Churchill, John. "SeaLand reborn with great expectations". Maersk. Maersk Post. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  12. ^ "Return of the Sea-Land". Ships & Ports. Ships & Ports. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  13. ^ Churchill, John. "SeaLand reborn with great expectations". Maersk. Maersk Post. Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  14. ^ Kimble, Jenifer (September 8, 2014). "SeaLand to re-enter Latin America trade". American Journal of Transportation (587). Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  15. ^ Tirschwell, Peter (January 8, 2014). "Maersk: Revival of SeaLand Means Container Shipping Now Two Industries". The Journal of Commerce. 
  16. ^ Kimble, Jenifer (September 8, 2014). "SeaLand to re-enter Latin America trade". American Journal of Transportation (587). Retrieved 16 February 2016. 
  17. ^ "SeaLand executive team". SeaLand. 
  • Cudahy, Brian J. (2006). Box Boats: How Container Ships Changed the World. Fordham University Press. ISBN 978-0-8232-2569-9. 
  • Levinson, Mark (2006). The Box: How the Shipping Container made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger. Princeton University Press. ISBN 978-0-691-13640-0. 

External links[edit]