Sea: Difference between revisions

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Revision as of 19:50, 29 July 2009

The term sea refers to certain large amounts of water, but there is inconsistency as to its precise definition and application. Most commonly, a sea may refer to a large expanse of saline water connected with an ocean, but it is also used sometimes for a large saline lake that lacks a natural outlet, e.g. the Caspian Sea. Colloquially, the term is used as a synonym for ocean. Additionally, large lakes, such as the Great Lakes of North America, are occasionally referred to as "inland seas".

List of seas

Atlantic Ocean

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Arctic Ocean

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Antarctic Ocean

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Indian Ocean

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Pacific Ocean

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Landlocked seas

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Bodies of water and their sizes

Rank Body of water Square miles (square kilometres)
1 Pacific Ocean Template:Mi2 to km2
2 Atlantic Ocean Template:Mi2 to km2
3 Indian Ocean Template:Mi2 to km2
4 Arctic Ocean Template:Mi2 to km2
5 Arabian Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
6 South China Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
7 Caribbean Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
8 Mediterranean Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
9 Bering Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
10 Gulf of Mexico Template:Mi2 to km2
11 Sea of Okhotsk Template:Mi2 to km2
12 Sea of Japan Template:Mi2 to km2
13 Hudson Bay Template:Mi2 to km2
14 East China Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
15 Andaman Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
16 Red Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
17 North Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
18 Baltic Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
19 Yellow Sea Template:Mi2 to km2
20 Persian Gulf Template:Mi2 to km2
21 Gulf of California Template:Mi2 to km2

Nomenclature

  • The Sea of Galilee is a small freshwater lake with a natural outlet, which is called Lake Tiberias or Lake Kinneret on modern Israeli maps, but its original name remains in use.
  • The Sea of Cortés is more commonly known as the Gulf of California.
  • The Persian Gulf is a sea.
  • The Dead Sea is actually a lake, as is the Caspian Sea.

Science

The term "sea" has also been used in quantum physics. Dirac sea is an interpretation of positron emission states that comprises the vacuum.

See also

References

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